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Three Big Things
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Perdue becomes first UGA alum in White House cabinet

Perdue becomes first UGA alum in White House cabinet

With former Georgia Gov. Sonny Perdue's confirmation Monday as the U.S. Department of Agriculture secretary, he becomes the first University of Georgia alumnus to be named to the White House Cabinet and the first Southerner to head the department in two decades. Perdue will lead the $150 billion agency, which directs the country's farm policy and food and nutrition programs. At UGA, Perdue attended undergraduate classes — and played on the football team one year as a walk-on — and then earned a doctorate in veterinary medicine in 1971. 'Secretary Perdue is a distinguished alumnus of the University of Georgia, and we are grateful for the tremendous support he has demonstrated for his alma mater over the years,' said UGA President Jere W. Morehead. 'We look forward to the important contributions he will make to the nation's vital agricultural industry in this new role.' As governor, Perdue championed UGA projects such as the Richard B. Russell Building Special Collections Libraries, the Medical Partnership and the new College of Veterinary Medicine hospital. He returned to campus often for official ceremonies, including the February 2004 dedication of the Student Learning Center, and to speak to students, including the May 2005 Commencement. During a College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences conference in 2007, Perdue said, 'One of Georgia's greatest strengths is our agricultural industry. Our farmers and our foresters. It's our oldest and largest industry.' After his final term as governor, Perdue gave his official papers in March 2011 to the Richard B. Russell Library for Political Research and Studies, part of UGA's special collections libraries. 'Because of his experience and his lifelong commitment to agriculture, we are pleased to have former Georgia Gov. Sonny Perdue as the new secretary of agriculture,' said Sam Pardue, dean of the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences. 'Not only does Secretary Perdue know firsthand the intricacies of providing, protecting and promoting the U.S. food system, he has long been a strong supporter of the land-grant mission in public universities across the country and our role in keeping U.S agriculture growing and leading in sustainable food production.' The USDA is the funding authority for land-grant university research and extension programs in agriculture, family and consumer science, and forestry. After graduating from UGA, Perdue served in the U.S. Air Force and was honorably discharged in 1974 with the rank of captain. He then practiced veterinary medicine in Raleigh, North Carolina, before returning to Bonaire, Georgia, to start businesses in grain trading and trucking. Perdue was elected to the state legislature in 1990 and became the state's first Republican governor since Reconstruction in 2003. Under Perdue's tenure, Georgia added new food safety regulations after a salmonella outbreak was traced to peanut butter made in the state. He oversaw the state's decades-long water dispute with Alabama and Florida, as well as a historic drought that prompted Perdue to call for strict water restrictions. Perdue is the second Georgian to join the current Cabinet, following former U.S. Rep. Tom Price of Roswell, who is now secretary of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. His cousin, U.S. Sen. David Perdue, is hosting him in Washington, D.C., this spring.

Gym Dog coach Danna Durante fired

Gym Dog coach Danna Durante fired

The University of Georgia student-run newspaper Red and Black is reporting the dismissal of University of Georgia gymnastics coach Danna Durante, who has just completed her fifth season at the head of the Gym Dogs program.  From the AJC: ATHENS — Georgia will be looking for its third gymnastics coach since the legendary Suzanne Yoculan retired. Danna Durante was fired on Monday after five seasons leading one of UGA’s most visible sports. A source confirmed the news on Monday night. The school has not announced the news yet, but Durante was not at the athletics department’s athlete dinner on Monday night. The Red and Black first reported Durante’s firing. The Gym Dogs finished 12th at the NCAA championships two weeks ago, after going 11-9 in the regular season with a No. 10 national ranking. Afterwards Durante called it “a rough season.” Since then three gymnasts were dismissed from the team by Durante. Yoculan retired in 2009 after winning five straight national championships. She was replaced by top assistant Jay Clark, who was let go after three seasons. Then athletics director Greg McGarity hired Durante, who had been at California. Durante’s top finish at Georgia was fifth nationally. This is the second coach that McGarity, who began his tenure Aug. 2010, has hired and then fired. His first hire was in volleyball, and he made a coaching change in that sport last year. The baseball team is also struggling this year in its four season under Scott Stricklin, who was hired four years ago. UPDATE 8:10am Press release issued by UGA Athletics: “University of Georgia gymnastics coach Danna Durante will not be retained according to an announcement Tuesday by UGA J. Reid Parker Director of Athletics Greg McGarity. “We will move forward with a national search as quickly as possible to fill the head coaching position for our gymnastics team,” said McGarity. Durante recently finished her fifth season as head coach at Georgia, capped by a 12th-place finish at the NCAA Championships. In 2017, Georgia finished 15-15 overall with a 4-3 mark in conference competition. In Durante’s five years, Georgia qualified for the Super Six three times, once over the last three seasons.”

Suspects from Winder, Braselton arrested in Gwinnett Co child sex sting

Suspects from Winder, Braselton arrested in Gwinnett Co child sex sting

Gwinnett County authorities arrested 23 men, including a member of the U.S. Air Force, connected to an underage sex sting, GBI officials said Monday. The arrests were made within the past five days.  The men, officials said, pretended to be teenagers online to lure minors and have sex with them in exchange for money. Most of the men are from the metro Atlanta area, including 14 from Gwinnett, and are believed to be between 19 and 48 years old, GBI spokeswoman Nelly Miles said.    Professional “chatters” posing as 13- and 14-year-old children posted profiles and ads “looking for a good time” on dating websites and sites like Backpage.com, a classified ad site that has been accused of facilitating prostitution and human trafficking, Gwinnett Det. David Smith said. “Online child predators visit chat rooms and websites on the Internet, find children, begin conversations with them, introduce sexual content and arrange a meeting with the children for the purpose of having sex,” Miles said.  The men’s professions include electrician, construction worker, retail employee, mechanic, hotel employee and janitor. One man arrested, Edward Harold Ramsey, 24, of Wichita, Kan., is a member of the Air Force. Some of the chatters engaged with the suspects over a few days, and others spent weeks talking to the men, Smith said. All of the suspects were arrested at a home or a “second location,” both in Gwinnett, where they believed they would be meeting a child for sex. Gwinnett police did not disclose the specific locations of either place. None of the 23 suspects has previous charges or reports of sexual offenses, but police are continuing to look into their backgrounds to determine if they have previously abused children, Smith said. Some of the suspects have children of their own and some worked in places where they would frequently have contact with children, like malls, Smith said.  Most of those arrested were charged with sexual exploitation of a minor, and many were charged with child molestation. Under Georgia law, you can be charged with child molestation without touching a minor, but intending to commit the act. Those who offered to pay for sex with a child have also been charged with human trafficking, Smith said. The investigation is part of the GBI’s “Operation Spring Cleaning” in partnership with the Gwinnett County Police Department and the Georgia Internet Crimes Against Children (ICAC).  Since 2014, the Georgia ICAC has arrested 77 people in similar operations. Since its inception in 2002, the organization has made more than 2,000 arrests.  Those arrested in the sting: Scott Robert Baxter, 34, Tucker  Andrew Sean Carroll, 19, Dacula Brian Dwayne Clark, 41, Winder Alisha Gagguturu, 23, Suwanee  Connor Fionn Hale, 23, Lawrenceville Demetrius Deshawn Harper, 22, Lawrenceville Joel Blake Jackson, 22, Braselton Rasesh Jagtap, 33, Alpharetta Akshat Jasra, 35, Alpharetta David Kelley, 22, College Park Steven Anthony King, 26, Clarksville Horacio Mendoza, 28, Lawrenceville Andrew Ryan Murphy, 22, Norcross Max Park, 37, Suwanee Edward Harold Ramsey, 24, Wichita, Kan. Melchior Simon, 28, Duluth  Martinez-Torres Sixto, 30, Norcross  Brett William Smith Jr., 35, no city listed  Zadok Smith, 27, Duluth James Evan Soggs, 20, Sandy Springs  Adis Spahic, 40, Lawrenceville Ertiza Talukder, 23, Lawrenceville  William David Warren, 41, Winder   

ATHENS, GA. --- Southeastern Conference Commissioner Greg Sankey has named 78 University of Georgia student-athletes to the winter SEC Academic Honor Roll, announced this week. The honor roll includes the sports of basketball, equestrian, gymnastics and swimming & diving. It is based on grades from the 2016 spring, summer and fall terms. To be eligible for nomination, the student-athlete must have completed a minimum of 24 semester hours and have a grade point average of 3.0 or higher.   Georgia’s 78 student-athletes was the second highest in the conference, behind Auburn’s 96. South Carolina also posted 78 to the honor roll, followed by Kentucky’s 70.   The following UGA student-athletes were named to the 2016-2017 Winter SEC Academic Honor Roll:   Men’s Basketball: Houston Kessler (Management); Connor O’Neill (Finance); Juwan Parker (Kinesiology); Brandon Young (Management)   Women’s Basketball: Haley Clark (Finance); Mackenzie Engram (Journalism)   Equestrian: Bailey Anderson (Biochemical Engineering); Payton Anderson (Finance); Madison Anger (Biology); Madison Beasley (Journalism); Sydney Beasley (Exercise and Sport Science); Taylor Carman (Communication Studies and Criminal Justice); Lindsey Cheek (Management Information Systems); Addyson Cord (Chemistry); Carissa Duvall (Biology); Liza Finsness (Biology); Chaney Getchell (Accounting); Vanessa Gillette (Marketing); Liza Goodlett (Journalism); Allie Harbert (Psychology and Biology); Kyndall Harper (Human Development and Family Science); Grace Howard (Fashion Merchandising; Housing Management and Policy); Caroline Johnson (Biology); Samantha Johnson (Risk Management and Insurance); Ashlin Liedberg (Early Childhood Education); Emma Mandarino (Accounting); Eva Marcelis (Arabic and International Affairs); Vanessa McCarthy (Consumer Economics); Alexis Mougalian (Business); Madison Newman (Risk Management and Insurance); Ashlyn Perry (Communication Science and Disorders); Grace Porter (Biology and Genetics); Caroline Robinson (Psychology); Emma Schauder (English); Kelly Skoglund (Management Information Systems); Claudia Spreng (International Business and Finance); Agne Stoskute (Animal Science); Catherine Sullivan (Journalism and International Affairs); Jane Sutcliff (Psychology); Charley Thiel (Furnishings and Interiors); Danielle Walawender (Animal Science)   Gymnastics: Jasmine Arnold (Criminal Justice and Psychology); Vivi Babalis (Sport Management); Grace Cherrey (Marketing); Lauren Johnson (Human Development and Family Science); Gigi Marino (Early Childhood Education); Morgan Reynolds (Consumer Journalism); Beth Roberts (Management Information Systems); Hayley Sanders (Dietetics and Consumer Foods); Rachel Schick (Biological Science)   Men’s Swimming and Diving: Blake Atmore (Legal Studies; International Business & Finance); Alex Bemiller (Marketing); Gunnar Bentz (Management); Powell Brooks (Finance); Aidan Burns (Biochemistry and Molecular Biology); Pace Clark (Management); Taylor Dale (Management); Ian Forlini (Marketing); James Guest (Finance); Patrick Humphreys (Biochemistry and Molecular Biology); Joshua Kenway (Political Science and Economics); Jay Litherland (Management); John Mattern (Risk Management and Insurance); Basil Orr (Finance); Christopher Powell (Real Estate); Walker Wheeler (Management)   Women’s Swimming and Diving: Emily Cameron (International Affairs and Political Science); Caitlin Casazza (Exercise and Sport Science); Madison Duvall (Human Development and Family Science); Allison Greene (Sport Management); Kimberlee John-Williams (International Affairs and Political Science); Megan Kingsley (Marketing); Ashley Mallon (International Affairs); Anna McKenzie (Spanish); Meaghan Raab (Journalism); Kelly Thatcher (Exercise and Sport Science); Chantal Van Landeghem (Psychology); Rachel Zilinskas (Statistics and Risk Management and Insurance)
The Peabody Awards Board of Jurors has selected 11 winners across the categories of News, Public Service, Radio/Podcast and Web. The honorees range from relentless local and national news investigations and a children's podcast with a nod to the charms of the early days of radio to a stunning interactive display of Houston's ever-present vulnerability to climate change. The Peabody Awards are based at the Grady College of Journalism and Mass Communication at the University of Georgia. This selection rounds out the final Peabody 30, all of which will be honored at the 76th Annual Peabody Awards ceremony on May 20 in New York, hosted by Rashida Jones. NEWS 'Arrested at School: Criminalizing Classroom Misbehavior' KNTV Bay Area (NBC) A rigorous examination into local school districts relying on police as a means of student discipline reveals an alarming overreach by law enforcement. The result for many students-mostly minority populations-is juvenile citations that become permanent criminal records. Tenacious reporting contributes to the larger conversation about rebuilding trust between police and their communities. 'Charity Caught on Camera' WTHR-TV Indianapolis (NBC) In a fine example of the impact investigative journalism can have on communities, reporters uncover layers of mismanagement and corruption at a local nonprofit, including catching the charity's pastor taking donated goods for his own use. Further probing eventually led to the resignations of top leadership, prompting a separate investigation by the state's attorney general. 'ISIS in Iraq and Syria,' 'Undercover in Syria,' 'Battle for Mosul'CNN These three packages from CNN's seasoned war correspondents feature outstanding, on-the-ground reporting from the Middle East. Graphic images of the wounded and the bloodied bring the senselessness of the fighting to the foreground, as do haunting images of young children who've only seen and experienced a world of airstrikes, fear, pain and loss. 'Dangerous Exposure' WTHR-TV Indianapolis (NBC) This excellent local investigative journalism piece uses diligent reporting and creative visuals to tell the story of how one Indiana watchdog agency failed to do its job. A voluntary remediation program allowed companies to shirk their duties to clean up sites leaking poison into groundwater in residential areas. The investigation exposed decades of lax oversight and served as a catalyst for change within the agency. 'Heart of an Epidemic, West Virginia's Opioid Addiction' The CBS Evening News with Scott Pelley (CBS) As opioid addiction continues to eat away and destroy largely working class communities across the country, CBS reporter Jim Axelrod ventured to West Virginia, investigating shady 'pill mills' and doctors interested more in profit than healing to reveal culpability and collusion of both government and industry. PUBLIC SERVICE '#MoreThanMean - Women in Sports ‘Face' Harassment' Just Not Sports & One Tree Forest Films (YouTube/Twitter/Facebook) A moving attack on misogynistic troll culture, this short video's simple message about civility online painfully conveys the damage of vicious tweets. #MoreThanMean is an extremely powerful four minutes that encourages both an end to silence around abuse of women in sports journalism and a reflection on the toxic treatment of women online in general. RADIO/PODCAST 'In the Dark' APM Reports An examination of a 27-year-old cold case in central Minnesota asks what went wrong and with immaculate storytelling and journalistic precision asks why it took so long to solve. A tour de force of investigative reporting, 'In the Dark' is a podcast as deftly incisive in telling the human tale as it is full and unrelenting in its attention to broader policy implications. 'The Unexplainable Disappearance of Mars Patel' Mars Patel LLC (Panoply) This original, serialized podcast transports listeners to follow Mars Patel-a plucky but brilliant outcast prone to trouble-and his friends as they investigate the mysterious connection between disappearing kids and a billionaire inventor. With vivid characters and fast-paced storytelling, 'The Unexplainable Disappearance of Mars Patel' recaptures the best of golden age radio while also representing fresh and diverse young voices.'This American Life: Anatomy of Doubt' This American Life, PBC in collaboration with The Marshall Project and ProPublica (Multiple stations/platforms) The story of a young woman whose allegations of rape are dismissed as attention-seeking lies by both the police and those closest to her juxtaposed with the account of how her rapist was eventually captured by another police department. The report is a chilling indictment of doubt, a harrowing picture of the vilification and criminal prosecution the victim suffered and a heartfelt reminder to trust what victims say. 'Wells Fargo Hurts Whistleblowers' NPR A substantial report on the systemic issues of a ravenous sales culture at Wells Fargo that led not only to the creation of 2 million fake consumer banking accounts but also the irrevocable blacklisting of employees who attempted to report unethical practices. Interviews with former employees detail the pressures of working in a grindhouse atmosphere to meet daily quotas and the damaging repercussions of whistleblowing, which prompted further U.S. Senate inquiry on bank self-regulation. WEB 'Hell and High Water'ProPublica and The Texas Tribune A multimedia, interactive collaboration that weaves cutting-edge climate science, digital mapping tools, engineering simulations, on-the-ground reporting and compelling photography to tell the story of Houston's current and future vulnerability to dangerous flooding resulting from global warming.
The University of Georgia will launch a new program to increase underrepresented minority enrollment in graduate programs in the STEM fields of science, technology, engineering and mathematics. The Bridges to the Doctorate program, which is funded by a $1 million grant from the National Science Foundation, builds on the university's longstanding Peach State Louis Stokes Alliance for Minority Participation program. In the decade since the Peach State LSAMP was established, minority undergraduate enrollment in STEM fields at UGA has tripled. Through the new grant, students who successfully complete the undergraduate program will have an opportunity to continue their education at UGA and pursue a doctorate. 'The U.S. is at a critical inflection point with respect to its STEM workforce,' said Graduate School Dean Suzanne Barbour. 'While the overall demographics of the country are changing rapidly, diversity of the STEM workforce has lagged behind. This disparity has potential to threaten our role as the global leader in STEM research and development. Programs like Bridges to the Doctorate are essential, as they will allow us to retain the best and brightest minds in the pipeline to the STEM workforce.' Through the Bridges to the Doctorate program, 12 LSAMP alumni will receive two years of support for work toward a doctoral degree, with the remaining support coming from the department in which they study. The Bridges to the Doctorate program also offers peer and faculty mentoring, professional development, social support and outreach opportunities. The first cohort will begin their studies this summer. The Peach State LSAMP is led by UGA and provides academic enrichment, financial support, peer and faculty mentoring, and research opportunities for students at UGA as well as those at Fort Valley State University, Kennesaw State University, Georgia Tech, Georgia State University, Perimeter College and Savannah State University. The program began in 2006, and a $4 million NSF grant awarded in 2016 will fund the program through 2021. Students eligible for the UGA Bridges to the Doctorate traineeship include graduates of the Peach State Alliance or any other NSF-funded LSAMP alliance throughout the country. 'The Peach State LSAMP grant has had incredible success in increasing the numbers of underrepresented students who are retained and graduate in STEM majors,' said Michelle Cook, associate provost and chief diversity officer. Cook's office administers the Peach State LSAMP program. 'Bridges to the Doctorate provides an excellent opportunity for us to leverage this success as we continue to build the pipeline from undergraduate degree, through graduate study, on into industry, research and the professoriate. These intentional and focused efforts will benefit our students, the university and the future of STEM education in the United States for years to come.' UGA's Bridges to the Doctorate program comes at a time when enrollment in STEM fields at the university is increasing dramatically. Twenty-one percent of all undergraduate degrees UGA awarded last year were in STEM fields, an increase of 5 percentage points over the past five years. Thirty-two percent of all Ph.D. students enrolled at UGA are in STEM disciplines, which also reflects an increase of 5 percentage points over the past five years. Data from the U.S. Department of Commerce projects growth in STEM occupations that will outpace other sectors through 2024. In addition, STEM degree holders can expect to earn at least 12 percent more than non-STEM degree holders, whether they work in STEM occupations or not. The University of Georgia is one of the nation's leading producers of minority graduate degree holders. Diverse Issues in Higher Education ranks UGA 13th among all U.S. universities for the number of doctoral degrees awarded to African-Americans, and in 2016 the university received two grants through the NSF INCLUDES program. In addition, UGA is collaborating on a $2 million grant from NSF's Alliances for Graduate Education and the Professoriate program that seeks to increase the number of individuals from underrepresented groups in the science and engineering workforce. 'The Bridges to the Doctorate program builds on an impressive array of programming at the University of Georgia that fosters diversity and expands professional development opportunities for graduate students,' said Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs and Provost Pamela Whitten. 'These extraordinary programs elevate graduate education and play a vital role in keeping our state and nation at the forefront of innovation and discovery.
With former Georgia Gov. Sonny Perdue's confirmation Monday as the U.S. Department of Agriculture secretary, he becomes the first University of Georgia alumnus to be named to the White House Cabinet and the first Southerner to head the department in two decades. Perdue will lead the $150 billion agency, which directs the country's farm policy and food and nutrition programs. At UGA, Perdue attended undergraduate classes — and played on the football team one year as a walk-on — and then earned a doctorate in veterinary medicine in 1971. 'Secretary Perdue is a distinguished alumnus of the University of Georgia, and we are grateful for the tremendous support he has demonstrated for his alma mater over the years,' said UGA President Jere W. Morehead. 'We look forward to the important contributions he will make to the nation's vital agricultural industry in this new role.' As governor, Perdue championed UGA projects such as the Richard B. Russell Building Special Collections Libraries, the Medical Partnership and the new College of Veterinary Medicine hospital. He returned to campus often for official ceremonies, including the February 2004 dedication of the Student Learning Center, and to speak to students, including the May 2005 Commencement. During a College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences conference in 2007, Perdue said, 'One of Georgia's greatest strengths is our agricultural industry. Our farmers and our foresters. It's our oldest and largest industry.' After his final term as governor, Perdue gave his official papers in March 2011 to the Richard B. Russell Library for Political Research and Studies, part of UGA's special collections libraries. 'Because of his experience and his lifelong commitment to agriculture, we are pleased to have former Georgia Gov. Sonny Perdue as the new secretary of agriculture,' said Sam Pardue, dean of the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences. 'Not only does Secretary Perdue know firsthand the intricacies of providing, protecting and promoting the U.S. food system, he has long been a strong supporter of the land-grant mission in public universities across the country and our role in keeping U.S agriculture growing and leading in sustainable food production.' The USDA is the funding authority for land-grant university research and extension programs in agriculture, family and consumer science, and forestry. After graduating from UGA, Perdue served in the U.S. Air Force and was honorably discharged in 1974 with the rank of captain. He then practiced veterinary medicine in Raleigh, North Carolina, before returning to Bonaire, Georgia, to start businesses in grain trading and trucking. Perdue was elected to the state legislature in 1990 and became the state's first Republican governor since Reconstruction in 2003. Under Perdue's tenure, Georgia added new food safety regulations after a salmonella outbreak was traced to peanut butter made in the state. He oversaw the state's decades-long water dispute with Alabama and Florida, as well as a historic drought that prompted Perdue to call for strict water restrictions. Perdue is the second Georgian to join the current Cabinet, following former U.S. Rep. Tom Price of Roswell, who is now secretary of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. His cousin, U.S. Sen. David Perdue, is hosting him in Washington, D.C., this spring.
Athens-Clarke County Commissioners meet in executive session today: they’ll go behind closed doors to consider nominations to various County boards and authorities.  There are Authority meetings today in Athens: the Athens Airport Authority, 3:30 at Athens-Ben Epps Airport, and the Classic Center Authority, 4 o’clock at the Classic Center.  Today is a busy day for Oconee County Commissioners: another budget session is set for 5 o’clock at the Oconee County courthouse in Watkinsville, followed by a 7 o’clock agenda setting session, also at the courthouse.  Barrow County Commissioners meet tonight, 7 o’clock in Winder.  Hall County Commissioners talk about a traffic circle: the plans for the roundabout at Ledan and Sardis roads were the focus of a Monday Commission work session in Gainesville. 
The University of Georgia student-run newspaper Red and Black is reporting the dismissal of University of Georgia gymnastics coach Danna Durante, who has just completed her fifth season at the head of the Gym Dogs program.  From the AJC: ATHENS — Georgia will be looking for its third gymnastics coach since the legendary Suzanne Yoculan retired. Danna Durante was fired on Monday after five seasons leading one of UGA’s most visible sports. A source confirmed the news on Monday night. The school has not announced the news yet, but Durante was not at the athletics department’s athlete dinner on Monday night. The Red and Black first reported Durante’s firing. The Gym Dogs finished 12th at the NCAA championships two weeks ago, after going 11-9 in the regular season with a No. 10 national ranking. Afterwards Durante called it “a rough season.” Since then three gymnasts were dismissed from the team by Durante. Yoculan retired in 2009 after winning five straight national championships. She was replaced by top assistant Jay Clark, who was let go after three seasons. Then athletics director Greg McGarity hired Durante, who had been at California. Durante’s top finish at Georgia was fifth nationally. This is the second coach that McGarity, who began his tenure Aug. 2010, has hired and then fired. His first hire was in volleyball, and he made a coaching change in that sport last year. The baseball team is also struggling this year in its four season under Scott Stricklin, who was hired four years ago. UPDATE 8:10am Press release issued by UGA Athletics: “University of Georgia gymnastics coach Danna Durante will not be retained according to an announcement Tuesday by UGA J. Reid Parker Director of Athletics Greg McGarity. “We will move forward with a national search as quickly as possible to fill the head coaching position for our gymnastics team,” said McGarity. Durante recently finished her fifth season as head coach at Georgia, capped by a 12th-place finish at the NCAA Championships. In 2017, Georgia finished 15-15 overall with a 4-3 mark in conference competition. In Durante’s five years, Georgia qualified for the Super Six three times, once over the last three seasons.”
Logan Booker
Logan Booker is a graduate of the Grady College of Journalism and Mass Communication at the University of Georgia, where he earned a degree in magazine journalism in addition to a certificate in Grady Sports Media. He was raised in Lawrenceville, Ga, and in addition to his current home in Athens, he spends lots of time with his dog and his boat in Lincoln County, Georgia. Logan has covered UGA sports since 2012, previously with Bulldawg Illustrated.
Portion of Thomas Street parking deck collapses
Portion of Thomas Street parking deck collapses
Tim Bryant
Tim Bryant is the News Director for Cox Media Group Athens and works as a correspondent for WSB Radio, ABC and the Associated Press and was a commentator for the BBC and Radio New Zealand. Tim is the host of Classic City Today, North Georgia This Week, and Newsmakers. 
More snow for NE Ga mountains
More snow for NE Ga mountains
Trump keeps Export-Import Bank, but chooses fierce critic to run it
Trump keeps Export-Import Bank, but chooses fierce critic to run it
Abby Jessen
Abby is a news reporter for Cox Media Group Athens. She is from Roswell, Georgia, and is currently in Athens as a student at the University of Georgia double majoring in Digital and Broadcast Journalism and Marketing. 
Jackson EMC Outage Update
Jackson EMC Outage Update
Allen Tibbetts
During his 41-year career doing morning show radio, what he found most rewarding was taking the slices of life he observed and making them into fun, funny or satirical stories that, hopefully, the audience would enjoy. Allen now shares these stories with the WGAU audience in Tales from Tibby. 
The Right Reverend Tibby 
The Right Reverend Tibby 
Meet Shrek and Reign!