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Health Headlines

    A nurse from Oklahoma is suing a plastic surgery center in Texas and her surgeon after she said a procedure has left her permanently paralyzed. Rolanda Hutton, 44, went to the Dallas Plastic Surgery Institute in January for a Brazilian butt lift, WFAA reported. What was supposed to be an outpatient procedure turned into a nightmare for Hutton. >> Read more trending news   When Hutton awakened from the procedure, she couldn't feel her legs or feet. She told staff, but she says they placed her in a post-operative hotel room instead of taking her to the hospital. The lawsuit alleges that the doctor injected too much fat into her gluteal muscles, which put pressure on her sciatic nerve. Hutton's attorney, Les Weisbord, called Hutton's condition a medical emergency. By the time Hutton was taken to the hospital, it was too late to repair the nerve damage, WFAA reported. Doctors have told Hutton she'll never walk again. The lawsuit, filed Thursday, is asking for $5 million to cover Hutton’s future care and lost wages. Dallas Plastic Surgery Institute referred all questions about the lawsuit to its attorney.
  • Fotis Kafatos, a Greek molecular biologist who had a distinguished academic career in both the United States and Europe and became the founding president of the European Research Council, has died. He was 77.His family announced his death in Heraklion, Crete on Saturday 'after a long illness.' on Saturday.Born in Crete in 1940, Kafatos was known for his research on malaria and for sequencing the genome of the mosquito that transmits the disease.He was a professor at Harvard University during 1969-1994, where he also served as chairman of the Cellular and Developmental Biology Department, and at Imperial College in London since 2005. He had been an adjunct professor at the Harvard School of Public Health since 2007.Kafatos was also a part-time professor at the University of Crete in his hometown since 1982. He also was the third director of the European Molecular Biology Laboratory, a life sciences research organization funded by multiple countries, from 1993 to 2005.Kafatos considered the 2007 founding of the European Research Council under the auspices of the European Commission as his crowning achievement. The council funds and promotes projects driven by researchers. He stepped down as founding president in 2010.He came to be disillusioned by the heavily bureaucratic rules that, in his mind, hampered research.'We continuously had to spend energy, time and effort on busting bureaucracy roadblocks that kept appearing in our way,' Kafatos told scientific journal Nature soon after left the post. But, he added, 'we delivered to Europe what we promised.
  • Higher monthly premiums for outpatient coverage await many Medicare beneficiaries next year, the government says. The additional expense will eat away at an increase in their Social Security checks.The news about 'Part B' premiums was buried in the fine print of a notice issued late Friday afternoon by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services.'For many seniors living on fixed incomes this could be a concern,' said Tricia Neuman, an expert on the Medicare program at the nonpartisan Kaiser Family Foundation. 'People who are expecting an increase in their Social Security checks because of the cost-of-living adjustment may be disappointed.'Although the standard Part B premium will stay the same next year — $134 a month — many beneficiaries will still have to pay more. That's because their Social Security checks are going up 2 percent after several years of little or no cost-of-living raise.Many of those affected are now paying $109 a month, so they'll owe $25 more. The government didn't release specific estimates of the number of people who'll be paying the higher rates.By law, increases in the Part B premium can't exceed increases in Social Security benefits. But several years of low inflation have put a damper on Social Security cost-of-living adjustments. Medicare responded by keeping premiums stable for many beneficiaries. But now that Social Security checks are growing again, so will premiums.Medicare's announcement said the Part B deductible will stay the same next year, $183. That's the annual amount patients pay for medical services before Medicare coverage kicks in.But the inpatient 'Part A' deductible will go up by $24, to $1,340.Many seniors purchase private insurance to cover their Medicare deductibles and copayments.But the monthly Part B premium is paid by most beneficiaries, except those with very low incomes. It's generally deducted from retirees' Social Security checks.The late Friday afternoon time slot is often used by the government for unwelcome announcements.
  • As the first glimmer of dawn appeared across the Rhine River, delegates stumbled out of an all-night negotiating session at this year's global climate talks, expressing satisfaction Saturday at the progress made toward creating a comprehensive rule book for fighting global warming.The two-week meeting in Bonn, Germany, was billed as a 'blue-collar' event designed to hammer out the technical details of the 2015 Paris climate accord. But fears had loomed large beforehand that the administration of U.S. President Donald Trump, who rejects the Paris agreement, would seek to block any advances seen as counter to American interests.In the end, most agreed that U.S. diplomats had engaged constructively, while delegations from several American states, cities and businesses were praised for committing themselves to the goals of the Paris agreement.The role of spoiler almost fell to Saudi Arabia, which held up a final agreement for several hours over objections to a phrase it feared might allow for future levies on fossil fuels like oil.'There has been positive momentum all around us,' said Fiji's Prime Minister Frank Bainimarama, who presided over the meeting and swung the gavel to close it about 7 a.m.'We leave Bonn having notched up some notable achievements,' Bainimarama said, citing agreements on agriculture, ocean protection, indigenous people's rights and the launch of a new system to help people in poor countries get insurance against the effects of climate change.Many countries are already feeling the heat that is enveloping the globe, with dramatic floods, hurricanes and droughts across the world in recent months adding a sense of urgency to the talks.Environmental groups expressed satisfaction at the outcome of the negotiations, while noting there's much still to do and little time left to ensure the Paris accord's goal of keeping global warming significantly below 2 degrees Celsius (3.6 degrees Fahrenheit) is met.Experts say worldwide average temperatures have already risen 1 degree Celsius since pre-industrial times, largely due to carbon emissions from the United States and Europe over the past century.'The conference gets a grade of 'meets expectations,'' said Andrew Deutz of The Nature Conservancy, an Arlington-based environmental group. 'We are still headed in the right direction, but since the U.S. took its foot off the accelerator, the risk of global climate action slowing down has increased.'U.S. diplomat Judith Garber, speaking at the talks Thursday, reiterated Trump's position that the United States will leave the Paris accord but added that 'we remain open to the possibility of rejoining at a later date under terms more favorable to the American people.'Garber, the acting assistant secretary of state for oceans and international environmental and scientific affairs, said Washington remains 'committed to mitigating greenhouse gas emissions through, among other things, increased innovation on sustainable energy and energy efficiency, and working toward low greenhouse gas emissions energy systems.'The conciliatory tone coming from U.S. diplomats was at odds with the more combative position taken by White House adviser George David Banks, who raised eyebrows by hosting a pro-coal event during the talks.'Having already abandoned its leadership role on climate, the Trump administration appears to be living in an alternate universe with its focus on fossil fuels,' said Paula Caballero, who heads the climate program of the Washington-based World Resources Institute.Caballero noted that the leaders of U.S. states, cities and businesses — who came to Bonn separately from the White House and State Department delegations — earned widespread approval for pledging to honor the Paris accord.Germany, which hosted the meeting, received mixed reviews. While many praised the country's negotiators for brokering deals between opposing groups at the talks, there was also disappointment that German Chancellor Angela Merkel failed to join other rich countries in announcing a firm deadline for phasing out the use of coal-fired power plants.Merkel is currently locked in coalition talks with the environmentalist Green party and the pro-business Free Democrats, who disagree about the use of coal.The Bonn meeting was a stepping stone toward next year's talks in Katowice, Poland , where key decisions will have to be made, including on finalizing the Paris rulebook and raising countries' national ambitions for cutting greenhouse gas emissions.___Follow Frank Jordans on Twitter at http://www.twitter.com/wirereporter
  • Many Medicare beneficiaries will pay higher monthly premiums next year for outpatient coverage, an expense that will eat away at an increase in their Social Security checks, the government announced late Friday afternoon.The news about 'Part B' premiums was buried in the fine print of a notice issued by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services.'For many seniors living on fixed incomes this could be a concern,' said Tricia Neuman, an expert on the Medicare program at the nonpartisan Kaiser Family Foundation. 'People who are expecting an increase in their Social Security checks because of the cost-of-living adjustment may be disappointed.'Although the standard Part B premium will stay the same next year — $134 a month — many beneficiaries will still have to pay more. That's because their Social Security checks are going up 2 percent after several years of little or no cost-of-living raise.Many of those affected are now paying $109 a month, so they'll owe $25 more. The government didn't release specific estimates of the number of people who'll be paying the higher rates.By law, increases in the Part B premium can't exceed increases in Social Security benefits. But several years of low inflation have put a damper on Social Security cost-of-living adjustments. Medicare responded by keeping premiums stable for many beneficiaries. But now that Social Security checks are growing again, so will premiums.Medicare's announcement said the Part B deductible will stay the same next year, $183. That's the annual amount patients pay for medical services before Medicare coverage kicks in.But the inpatient 'Part A' deductible will go up by $24, to $1,340.Many seniors purchase private insurance to cover their Medicare deductibles and copayments.But the monthly Part B premium is paid by most beneficiaries, except those with very low incomes. It's generally deducted from retirees' Social Security checks.The late Friday afternoon time slot is often used by the government for unwelcome announcements.
  • Two nurses lost their licenses after a television station persuaded courts to unseal a video secretly recorded by the family of a man who died in their care.The video shows the World War II veteran repeatedly calling for help, saying he can't breathe. It also shows the nurses failing to take life-saving measures and laughing as they try to start an oxygen machine.The family of 89-year-old James Dempsey of Woodstock, Georgia, sued the Northeast Atlanta Health and Rehabilitation Center in 2014.Dempsey's family declined to comment, citing a settlement with the nursing home, the station said.A statement from the center says care has improved since then, under different leadership.But WXIA-TV said the nurses didn't surrender their licenses until this September, after it sent The Georgia Board of Nursing a link to the video the nursing home fought three years to keep secret.The nurses included a nursing supervisor who told attorneys that, when she learned Dempsey had stopped breathing, she rushed to his room and took over CPR, keeping it up until paramedics arrived. The video shows that nobody was doing CPR when she arrived, and she did not start immediately.After being shown the video, she told the attorneys it was an honest mistake, based on her normal actions, the station reported.WXIA said records showed continued problems, including $813,000 in Medicare fines since 2015. It said the nursing home got a good inspection report in May, but still has Medicare's lowest score, a one-star rating.
  • Every year, Bridie Farrell travels to the state Capitol hoping it's the last time she has to urge lawmakers to pass the Child Victims Act and allow people molested as children to sue those responsible even after the statute of limitations on civil cases has expired.Each year has been a disappointment as the measure falls flat under pressure from big institutions such as the Catholic Church. But after high-profile sexual misconduct allegations against big names in Hollywood, politics and the media, Farrell said she believes next year may be different.Victims are feeling empowered, she said, and members of the public want action.'Given Harvey Weinstein, given Roy Moore, people are fired up,' said Farrell, a former competitive speed skater who says she was molested by an older skater and mentor when she was a girl in the 1990s.The long-debated measure known as the Child Victims Act would eliminate the civil and criminal statutes of limitations on abuse cases going forward. It also would create a one-time window, lasting a year, to allow for lawsuits no matter when the abuse is alleged to have occurred, basically giving a second chance to older cases in which the statutes of limitations have expired.The bill is expected to take on a higher profile following recent allegations. Weinstein, once a powerful Hollywood producer, has been accused of sexual misconduct and assault, and Moore, an Alabama Republican running for the U.S. Senate, has been accused by multiple women of sexual misconduct when they were teenagers, as young as 14, and he was an adult. Weinstein has denied engaging in any non-consensual sex, and Moore has denied all wrongdoing despite mounting allegations.New York now has one of the most restrictive statutes of limitations on child molestation in the country, along with states including Mississippi, Alabama and Michigan. Under current New York law, victims of child sexual abuse have until age 23 to pursue criminal charges or file lawsuits against their abusers.Several other states including California, Minnesota, Connecticut, Massachusetts and Georgia have recently enacted laws to expand time frames for victims' lawsuits. Massachusetts gives victims up to 35 years to sue. Ohio and Pennsylvania give victims until age 30.The New York bill has passed the Democratic-controlled Assembly and earned the backing of Democratic Gov. Andrew Cuomo but hasn't received a vote in the Republican-led Senate. The Catholic Church, the Boy Scouts and other large institutions oppose the bill, arguing the provision allowing for lawsuits for decades could do devastating financial harm to any institution that works with children.A law in California, passed in 2002, resulted in Catholic dioceses there paying $1.2 billion in legal settlements.New York's Catholic Conference supports alternative legislation that would eliminate the criminal statute of limitations on child sex crimes, give victims until they are 28 to file civil suits and not create a window for molestation lawsuits now barred by the statute of limitations.'We are open to any suggestion or any compromise that includes increasing or eliminating the criminal statute,' conference spokesman Dennis Poust said.Poust noted that the Archdiocese of New York has voluntarily set up a compensation program to help victims of clergy sexual abuse.Lawmakers will convene for the 2018 session in early January. A spokesman for Republican Senate Leader John Flanagan did not return messages seeking comment on the bill's chances.The bill's sponsor in the Senate, Democrat Brad Hoylman, said he expects the recent spate of allegations against Moore, Weinstein and other men will influence the debate — if only because the cases show how it often takes years for victims, underage or not, to step forward and level accusations against men in positions of authority.'National events have propelled this issue forward and serve as a rallying point,' he said. 'I'm more optimistic than ever that this session will be the breakthrough that we've been waiting for.
  • A university student's therapy dog has been allowed to stay in an Ohio sorority house until the courts sort out whether it needs to move because of another student's allergies.A federal judge's ruling issued Friday blocks Ohio State University from ordering the dog out of the Chi Omega sorority house.At issue are the health concerns of two students who live at the house. The dog is trained to help Madeleine Entine during her panic attacks. But another resident has complained the dog inflames her allergies and her Crohn's disease.The judge's preliminary injunction allowing the dog to stay says an Ohio State official didn't determine if it was the dog that had aggravated the student's allergies.The Columbus Dispatch reports the injunction will remain until the case goes to trial.
  • The president of the American Heart Association was recovering this week after suffering a minor heart attack at the organization’s scientific conference. Dr. John Warner had the cardiac episode on Monday in Anaheim, California, and was taken to a local hospital, where doctors inserted a stent to open a clogged artery, according to a press release from the organization. His wife, son and daughter were with him as he recovered. >> Read more trending news Warner’s family was on-hand to see him deliver his presidential address Sunday afternoon, during which Warner, 52, talked about the toll heart disease has taken on his family. Both his father and paternal grandfather required bypass surgery in their 60s, and he lost a maternal grandfather and great-grandfather to heart disease. He was 6 years old when his great-grandfather died suddenly, Warner said in his speech. It was the first time he was exposed to the term “heart attack,” he said.  Heart disease continued to plague his family as he grew up and into his adulthood.  “After my son was born and we were introducing him to his extended family, I realized something very disturbing,” Warner said, according to the release. “There were no old men on either side of my family. None. All the branches of our family tree (were) cut short by cardiovascular disease.” He told those at the conference that many other families have had the same experience with heart disease in the U.S. and around the world. “Together, we can make sure old men and old women are regulars at family reunions,” he said. “In other words, I look forward to a future where people have the exact opposite experience of my family, that children grow up surrounded by so many healthy, beloved, elderly relatives that they couldn’t imagine life any other way.” Click here to learn more about heart attacks. Following Warner’s heart attack on Monday, Nancy Brown, the chief executive officer for the AHA, said that his sudden illness highlights the organization’s message to the public. “John wanted to reinforce that this incident underscores the important message that he left us with in his presidential address yesterday -- that much progress has been made, but much remains to be done,” Brown said.  “Cardiac events can still happen anytime and anywhere.”   Warner, a practicing cardiologist, is chief executive officer of UT Southwester University Hospitals in Dallas, the news release said. 
  • As part of its effort to expand private health care, the Department of Veterans Affairs is exploring the possibility of merging its health system with the Pentagon's, a cost-saving measure that veterans groups say could threaten the viability of VA hospitals and clinics.VA spokesman Curt Cashour called the plan a potential 'game-changer' that would 'provide better care for veterans at a lower cost to taxpayers,' but he provided no specific details.Griffin Anderson, a spokesman for the Democrats on the House Veterans Affairs Committee, said the proposal — developed without input from Congress — would amount to a merger of the VA's Choice and the military's TRICARE private health care programs. Committee Democrats independently confirmed the discussions involved TRICARE.News of the plan stirred alarm from veterans groups, who said they had not been consulted, and sharp criticism from congressional Democrats who pledged to oppose any VA privatization effort that forces veterans 'to pay out of pocket for the benefits they have earned with their heroism.' VA is seeking a long-term legislative fix for Choice by year's end.'Today, we see evidence that the Trump administration is quietly planning to dismantle veterans' health care,' said House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif. 'House Democrats will fight tooth and nail against any efforts to diminish or destroy VA's irreplaceable role as the chief coordinator, advocate and manager of care for veterans.'Health care experts also expressed surprise that VA would consider a TRICARE merger to provide private care for millions of active-duty troops, military retirees and veterans. The two departments generally serve very different patient groups —older, sicker veterans treated by VA and generally healthier service members, retirees and their families covered by TRICARE.TRICARE is insurance that is paid by the government, but uses private doctors and hospitals. The VA provides most of its care via medical centers and clinics owned and run by the federal government, though veterans can also see private doctors through VA's Choice program with referrals by VA if appointments aren't readily available.'My overarching concern is these are very dramatic changes in the way health care is delivered to veterans,' said Carrie Farmer, a senior policy researcher on military care at Rand Corp., who has conducted wide-ranging research for VA. 'There haven't been studies on what the consequences are in terms of both costs and quality of care.'Navy Commander Sarah Higgins, a Pentagon spokeswoman, confirmed it was exploring with VA 'many possible opportunities to strengthen and streamline the health of our service members and veterans.' She declined to comment on specifics 'unless and until there is something to announce.'In its statement to The Associated Press, Cashour explained that VA Secretary David Shulkin was working with the White House and the Pentagon to explore 'the general concept' of integrating VA and Pentagon health care, building upon an already planned merger of electronic health care records between VA and the Pentagon. Because Shulkin has said an overhaul of VA's electronic medical records won't be completed for another seven to eight years, an effort such as a TRICARE merger likely couldn't happen before then.'This is part of the president's efforts to transform how government works and is precisely the type of businesslike, commonsense approach that rarely exists in Washington,' Cashour said.At least four of the nation's largest veterans' organizations — The American Legion, Veterans of Foreign Wars, AMVETS and Disabled American Veterans — called a TRICARE merger a likely 'non-starter' if it sought to transform VA care into an insurance plan.'VA is a health care provider and the VFW would oppose any effort to erode the system specifically created to serve the health care needs of our nation's veterans by reducing VA's role to a payer of care for veterans,' said Bob Wallace, executive director of VFW's Washington office.Louis Celli, director of veterans' affairs and rehabilitation for The American Legion, said any attempts to outsource services away from VA medical centers and clinics would be financially unsustainable and likely shift costs unfairly onto veterans with service-connected disabilities.He noted something similar occurred with TRICARE — military retirees were promised free care from military base hospitals. But then TRICARE began offering insurance to use private-sector care, and TRICARE beneficiary co-pays are now rising. 'The precedent the TRICARE model sets is not something we would accept on the VA side,' Celli said.During the 2016 campaign, President Donald Trump pledged to fix VA by expanding access to private doctors. In July, he promised to triple the number of veterans 'seeing the doctor of their choice.' More than 30 percent of VA appointments are made in the private sector.Some groups have drawn political battle lines, with the left-leaning VoteVets and the American Federation of Government Employees warning of privatization, and Concerned Veterans for America, backed by the billionaire conservative Koch brothers, pledging a well-funded campaign to give veterans wide freedom to see private doctors.Rep. Tim Walz of Minnesota, the top Democrat on the House Veterans Affairs Committee, called for an immediate public explanation 'without delay' for the quiet discussions to integrate TRICARE with VA's Choice.'The fact that the Trump administration has been having these secret conversations behind the backs of Congress and our nation's veterans is absolutely unacceptable,' said Walz, the highest-ranking enlisted service member to serve in Congress.A spokeswoman for Rep. Phil Roe of Tennessee, the Republican chairman of the House committee, said he planned to proceed with his bipartisan legislative plan to fix Choice without integrating TRICARE.___Follow Hope Yen on Twitter at https://twitter.com/hopeyen1

Local News

  • A manhunt is underway in Hall County for a man and woman accused of shooting at two police officers.  Gainesville police told Channel 2 Action News the incident happened along Athens Street at Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard Friday evening. Investigators asked people nearby to lock their doors and report any suspicious activity to police. Police told Channel 2's Steve Gehlbach  they are looking for Marcos Tovar, 20, and Alondra Rodriguez, 20. When officers responded to a suspicious persons call, police told Channel 2 Action News Tovar and Rodriguez started fighting with an officer. That's when police said Rodriguez pulled out a gun and pistol whipped an officer in the head.  TRENDING STORIES: Another cheating scandal: APS police chief disciplines 17 officers, dispatcher Lawsuit: Sun Dial restaurant ‘had no protections' to stop 5-year-old's death Woman carjacked, kidnapped while pumping gas Backup arrived and that's when Gainesville police said both suspects fired at two officers. They returned fire. 'They actively went after police officers with gunfire, so we know that they are dangerous,' said Gainesville Police Sgt. Kevin Holbrook. The police department said the officers were transported to the hospital due to minor injuries, but have since been released.  Neighbors said they ducked for cover when they heard gunfire.  'I was like boom, boom, boom, at least six or seven shots,' neighbors Shenna Johnson said. 'I just started screaming for my kids. I was terrified.' The Georgia Bureau of Investigation has been called in to help with the investigation. They said both Tovar and Rodriguez are considered to be 'armed and dangerous.
  • A University of Georgia student was arrested early Thursday morning after a high-speed chase in Athens. According to police, Hunter Ty Wilkerson, 19, reached speeds of 110 mph during the chase before he was eventually taken into custody. They said he was speeding because he had just stolen five traffic signs off the UGA campus. Athens-Clarke County police got involved when they noticed Wilkerson going 90 mph in a 35-mph zone around 3:30 a.m. 'At that point in itself he's reckless. He's putting lives in danger, to include his own and anyone else who's on the roadway,' said Epifanio Rodriguez with the Athens-Clarke County Police Department. TRENDING STORIES: Another cheating scandal: APS police chief disciplines 17 officers, dispatcher Lawsuit: Sun Dial restaurant ‘had no protections' to stop 5-year-old's death Woman carjacked, kidnapped while pumping gas Police said the chase began on Milledge Avenue and ended less than 10 minutes later when Wilkerson's truck went airborne. It crashed into several cars parked in front of the UGA police headquarters on Oconee Street. Police bodycam video obtained by Channel 2 Action News shows several officers taking the suspect into custody. Police said Wilkerson was on Snapchat during the chase. 'An officer looks through his phone and sees he was active on social media, Snapchat, and was sending out updates saying that he was in a pursuit with the police officer,' Rodriguez said. Wilkerson faces 25 charges, including fleeing a police officer, DUI and reckless driving.
  • Going to Athens and watching the Dawgs 'between the hedges' is one of the best ways to spend a Saturday. Sure, we may be biased, but there are very few environments like it in the country. According to a recent ranking by “For the Win,” the University of Georgia was ranked the second-best college football town in America. TRENDING STORIES: Lawsuit: Sun Dial restaurant ‘had no protections' to stop 5-year-old's death Police: Man who stole Chick-fil-A catering van taken into custody WSB-TV plans extensive coverage of the Georgia Dome demolition “For the Win” tracked social media activity among college football fans to create the rankings. “Come for the great music scene, stay for the football,” the rankings said about UGA. Georgia was beaten only by the University of Wisconsin in Madison. The Texas Longhorns in Austin, the LSU Tigers in Baton Rouge and the Michigan Wolverines in Ann Arbor rounded out the top 5. CLICK HERE to see the complete rankings. Information from JuliaKate E. Culpepper, The Atlanta Journal-Constitution, was used in this report.
  • It can happen in the branch office or the boardroom. Volkswagen did it to pass emissions tests. Wells-Fargo did it to squeeze more profits from their customers. Some school districts have it done it to boost their standardized test scores. Workplace cheating is a real and troublesome phenomenon, and new research from the University of Georgia explains how it starts-and how employers can help prevent it. 'It's the desire for self-protection that primarily causes employees to cheat,' said Marie Mitchell (pictured), an associate professor of management in UGA's Terry College of Business. 'Employees want to look valuable and productive, especially if they think their job is at risk.' In a recently published paper in the Journal of Applied Psychology, Mitchell and her co-authors examined performance pressure in the workplace and the behaviors that result from it. They found when employees feel their job depends on meeting high benchmarks, some fudge results in order to stay employed. For example, when Wells Fargo employees were told to meet new goals that included opening sky-high numbers of new accounts, thousands began to open fraudulent accounts in order to meet their quotas. Wells Fargo was fined $185 million in 2016 and publicly scorned as a result. Similar scenarios can play out across all industries, Mitchell said. 'We've seen it in finance, we've seen it with educators and test scores, we've seen it in sports, it's everywhere,' she said. 'Performance pressure elicits cheating when employees feel threatened. Even though there is the potential of getting a good payoff if they heighten their performance, there's also significant awareness that if they don't, their job is going to be at risk.' This is especially true when employees feel they cannot meet expectations any other way. That perception leads to anger, which in turn leads to unethical behavior, Mitchell said. This crucible of pressure and anger causes employees to focus on doing what is beneficial to them-even if it harms others. 'Angry and self-serving employees turn to cheating to meet performance demands. It's understandable,' Mitchell said. 'There's a cycle in which nothing is ever good enough today. Even if you set records last month, you may get told to break them again this month. People get angry about that, and their self-protective reflex is elicited almost subconsciously.' An expert on 'dark side' behaviors and a former human resources manager, Mitchell has been interested in cheating phenomena since her graduate school days. 'There were individuals in law school who would race to get to law journals before anyone else and tear out certain pages so that other students couldn't be as prepared in class,' she said. 'So I know cheating happens. I've seen it. But the research on this has taken place in behavioral labs, and that doesn't always translate well to the workplace. I wanted to find out a bit more about what actually happens at work.' To do so, her research team devised three studies. The first created a measure of workplace cheating behavior through a nationwide survey that asked participants about cheating behavior at work-what it is and if they'd seen it. The second and third studies were time-separated field surveys in which employees were asked about their performance pressure at one point in time, then were asked about their feelings and perceptions of the pressure and their cheating behaviors about a month later. The findings led to a breakthrough. The key, Mitchell said, is for managers to understand the potential threat of performance pressure to employees. If they coach employees on how to view pressure as non-threatening and focus on how to enhance performance ethically, cheating may be prevented. 'It could be that if you pair performance pressure with ethical standards and give employees the right kind of assurance within the workplace, it can actually motivate great performance,' she said. 'There have been many scholars who have argued that you need to stretch your employees because it motivates them, makes them step outside of their normal boxes and be more creative. Our research says that it could, but it also might cause them to act unethically.' The paper, 'Cheating Under Pressure: A Self-Protection Model of Workplace Cheating Behavior,' was co-authored by Michael D. Baer of Arizona State University, Maureen L. Ambrose and Robert Folger of the University of Central Florida and Noel F. Palmer of the University of Nebraska-Kearney.
  • A ceremony is set for 11 o’clock this morning at the courthouse in downtown Athens: they’ll unveil the official portrait of former State Court Chief Judge Kent Lawrence. From the Athens-Clarke County Public Information Office... Athens-Clarke County State Court Judges Ethelyn N. Simpson and Charles E Auslander will host a portrait unveiling ceremony in honor of former State Court Chief Judge N. Kent Lawrence at 11:00 a.m. on November 17, 2017 at the Athens-Clarke County Courthouse, 325 East Washington Street, Athens.    The judges of Athens-Clarke County will dedicate the portrait of Judge Lawrence, which was commissioned by the Western Circuit Bar Association and painted by Ms. Suzanne Royal, to hang in the State Court Courtroom of the Athens-Clarke County Courthouse. A reception will be held prior to the ceremony at 10:00 a.m. in the Courthouse Atrium, located on the 2nd floor.   Judge Lawrence presided over State Court from 1985 until his retirement in 2011 and was the founder of the DUI/Drug Court, which was the first DUI Court in the state of Georgia and one of the first nationwide. In the Athens DUI/Drug Court program, participants are held strictly accountable for their behavior. The participants are on intensive probation supervision, take frequent drug and alcohol screens, and participate in intense substance abuse treatment. Participants typically spend 14 to 20 months in the program.    Since 2001, the DUI/Drug Court has had over 300 participants successfully graduate from the program. In 2012, Judge Lawrence received the National Center for DWI Courts (NCDC) Leadership Award, the highest national honor, in recognition of his vision and commitment in the field of DUI courts. The DUI Court has been recognized as one of only four DWI Academy Courts in the United States, an honor bestowed by the NCDC in partnership with the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA). As an NCDC Academy Court, the Athens DUI/Drug Court helps to develop, identify, and test national best practices for DWI Courts, including answering questions, providing advice and hosting visitors, including court teams from other jurisdictions participating in training.    While nationally Judge Lawrence may be best known for his tireless efforts in promoting and starting accountability courts, he was best known for the first half of his life for his outstanding accomplishments as a University of Georgia football player. Lawrence’s service for the Athens’ community began shortly after an injury ended his football career and he returned to the University of Georgia to pursue a Master’s in Education.    When given the opportunity to work in law enforcement while being a student, Lawrence seized it. He worked as a University of Georgia police officer, then moved on to working as a detective within the UGAPD followed by serving as the first Police Chief of Clarke County in 1974. Judge Lawrence attended the Law School of Atlanta by working during the day, then making the two-hour round trip to school in Atlanta every night. After graduation, Lawrence worked with a private firm in Athens, then as a prosecutor under Harry Gordon, the former District Attorney for Athens-Clarke County. In 1985, Lawrence was appointed by Governor Joe Frank Harris as State Court Judge of Clarke County where he served for 26 years.

Bulldog News

  • ATHENS – Nick Chubb wasn’t himself Saturday. Oh, he ran hard and he gained a lot of yards and he scored some touchdowns. That we’ve all seen before. What we haven’t seen was Chubb celebrating and dancing. Well, sort of dancing. He climbed up on top of the cheerleaders’ platform in front of the UGA student section and celebrated Georgia’s 42-13 win over Kentucky with Sony Michel and the Bulldogs’ other seniors. Arm-in-arm, they sang and cheered and barked and laughed a little and smiled a lot and posed for a few thousand pictures. “Believe it or not, that was my first time ever doing that,” Chubb said in a postgame interview underneath the East End grandstands at Sanford Stadium. “I kind of saved it up for this moment.” Oh, we believe it, Nick. It was unlike anything we’ve seen before from the usually stoic tailback. For 42 games at Georgia, we’ve watched him smile and wave politely to the crowd as he jogged off the field after another one of his 100-yard rushing nights. No matter the gravity of the victory or how much he contributed to it, Chubb was never one to jump up in the stands or even dance some kind of jig. Usually, he’d slap a few hands on his way to the nearest field exit and maybe toss a sweatband or some gloves a kid’s way. “I had to convince him,” Michel, his roommate and backfield mate, said afterward. “It’s hard to convince him to do things like that.” It’s about time the kid showed some emotion. He deserved it. There was much to celebrate on this unseasonably warm and fuzzy Senior Night, much of it Chubb’s on doing. Let’s review. So he busted loose on a 55-yard touchdown run. That was a season-long run and gave Chubb 45 rushing TDs for his career (12 for the season).  That moves him to second on Georgia’s all-time list behind Herschel Walker (52), a theme you’re going to hear a lot in this space. That was Chubb’s second TD of the night, making it the 14th time he’s scored two or more in a game. That run also put him at 151 yards on the evening, making it the 23rd time he’s gone over the century mark. And it also put him over 1,000 yards for the season. He has 1,045 yards this year, so he stands now with Walker as the only two backs in Georgia history with three 1,000-yard seasons. It seems appropriate to interject here that Chubb had 747 yards when his sophomore season ended after five games with a knee injury. Else, he would’ve had four. “It’s an honor,” Chubb said of sharing a few more marks with Herschel. “That’s great company to have. Just to be with him, me and him, man, I’m happy about that.” You might note that it’s now really the only comparison to make with Chubb anymore, him and Herschel Walker. He’s eclipsed everybody else in Georgia history. What’s more, he’s doing it in this day and age. Not to take anything away from Walker or Bo Jackson or Marcus Dupree or any of those guys who thought nothing of carrying the ball 30 times a week. Chubb is doing what he’s doing in an era when SEC defenses don’t fall far down from NFL squads in terms of athletic pedigree and dedication to stuffing the run. And he’s also doing during a time in which coaches prefer their back share carries with others. While Chubb enters the 12th game of his fourth season with 686 carries, his best buddy Michel has 546 himself. That’s what I was thinking about when I asked Georgia coach Kirby Smart if he thought Chubb is underappreciated in terms of national acclaim. Smart went on a rant. “Yeah, I certainly feel like he’s underappreciated,” he said. “I don’t know how you guys feel but I appreciate what he’s done in an era where rushing the ball is really, really hard. It’s gotten harder and harder and harder. I’ve got no statistics to prove it but I’d venture to say Herschel ran for his (yards) in an era where a people were rushing the ball for a lot of yards. I’m not diminishing what Herschel did. I’m just enlightening people to Nick Chubb has rushed for three thousand-yard seasons in the SEC, the toughest conference in the country to run the ball. That’s pretty remarkable. “And he did alongside another back that is maybe just as talented as he is. What would he have done with 30 or 40 carries? Who knows. But I’m sure his body appreciates it.” Everybody is starting to appreciate a little more. It’s kind of like the old adage, you don’t really appreciate something or somebody until they’re gone. Well, Chubb’s not gone yet, but he’s almost out the door. Saturday was his last game in Sanford Stadium. He was one of 31 seniors the Bulldogs honored during Senior Day ceremonies before the game. That, Chubb said afterward, already had him feeling a little different before the game. He blamed Georgia’s slow start Saturday on those emotional proceedings, a rite of passage for seniors playing their last game between the hedges. The Bulldogs finally shook loose from its early doldrums. They needed Jake Fromm to hit a few passes downfield to get the running game going. When it finally did, it was devastating to Kentucky’s overmatched defense. Chubb’s teammates sensed something from him on Saturday. He seemed a little quicker, a little more shifty than usual. He busted through for his first TD on an eight-yard run midway through the third quarter. On the second play of the fourth, Chubb bounced an off-tackle dive outside and down the left sideline. Three Kentucky defenders who seemed to have angles to run him down did not. It was a 55-yard touchdown and gave the Bulldogs a 35-13 lead. “He looked fast on that run,” chirped Michel, who likes to tease Chubb about being faster. Chubb sounded very Herschel-esque in describing the sensational play. “It was great blocking,” he said. “I don’t think I got touched. I kind of hit the sideline wide open, so it was great blocking up front.” Same old Chubb there. But we’d learn later it was a different kind of night. There he was, the muscle-bound captain who never mugs for cameras or does touchdown poses, grinning from ear-to-ear and laughing and glad-handing fans and hugging teammates. For a few minutes, he seemed almost like a regular college student. But as we all know, he’s anything but. “It was a great moment,” Chubb said of his uncharacteristic celebration. “I know that’s my last time leaving that field as a Georgia Bulldog. That’s something I can never have back, so I had to enjoy it.” We did, too, Nick. We did, too. The post That was no ordinary Nick Chubb we saw running over and around Kentucky appeared first on DawgNation.
  • ATHENS – Admit it, Georgia fans. Your Bulldogs had you a little nervous there for a minute, didn’t they? No worries. It was Kentucky that Georgia was playing. The seventh-ranked Bulldogs won 42-13 for their 57th all-time victory over the Wildcats. Only Georgia Tech (67) has lost more times to Georgia. Speaking of Georgia Tech, Georgia improves to 10-1 (7-1 SEC) just in time to face its rival next Saturday in the series that has come to be called “Clean, Old-Fashioned Hate.” The Yellow Jackets won in overtime last year in Athens. They fell to 5-5 with Saturday’s 43-20 loss at Duke. Saturday was a milestone game for Georgia’s Nick Chubb. With a 55-yard touchdown run early in the fourth quarter, Chubb had 151 yards rushing in the game, 1,045 for the season and 4,469 for his career. Chubb and Herschel Walker are now the only UGA backs to rush for more than 1,000 yards in three seasons. With the victory, Georgia’s seniors finish undefeated at Sanford Stadium for the first time since 2012, when it last went to the SEC Championship Game. The Bulldogs also finished with a perfect record against Eastern Division opponents for the first time in school history. Before all that, UGA found itself trailing in the first quarter for the second straight week and managed just 21 yards on its first two possessions against the Wildcats. But then Kentucky remembered it was Kentucky. The Wildcats roughed Georgia’s punter and the Bulldogs took the ball the rest of the way for a touchdown and a lead they’d never relinquished. Kentucky kept it interesting. It received the second-half kickoff and went 75 yards in eight plays that mostly featured tailback Benny Snell to make it 21-13 on Snell’s 1-yard run. But the Bulldogs answered quickly with a long, scoring drive of their own, and order was restored. Somewhere in between, Georgia offensive coordinator Jim Chaney realized it was not against the rules to pass on first down. After calling runs on nine consecutive first downs, Chaney flipped the switch in the second quarter and turned Jake Fromm loose. The result was three consecutive completions and back-to-back touchdown drives to open up a 21-6. Georgia controlled the game from then on. The post Nick Chubb, No. 7 Georgia Bulldogs run over Kentucky appeared first on DawgNation.
  • ATHENS – One million, eight hundred and sixty thousand. Dollars. At the very least, that is how much “The Big Four” left on the table to play for the Georgia Bulldogs this season. Probably would’ve been more. As far as I know, nobody has ever referred to Davin Bellamy, Lorenzo Carter, Nick Chubb and Sony Michel as The Big Four. But how can you not? That is essentially certainly what they’ve been for Georgia this season. I’m not talking about statistical contributions, necessarily. Yes, they’ve all contributed significantly to the Bulldogs’ cause in terms of what they bring to the team on the field each Saturday. But it’s really a more intangible effect that the Big Four has had on the 2017 squad. It started with them walking away from that pile of money last December. “Those four guys (coming back), it just shows their commitment,” said fellow senior Jeb Blazevich, a tight end. “I think that really set the tone for the rest of the team. It said, ‘hey, we’re investing another whole year into this.’… Even the younger guys are thinking, ‘this season is special.’” And it has been special. Still is, despite that aberration that occurred last Saturday at Auburn. With a win Saturday against the Kentucky Wildcats (7-3, 4-3 SEC), the No. 7-ranked Bulldogs can improve to 10-1 on the season and finish the year undefeated at home. They’ve already punched their ticket to Atlanta’s Mercedes-Benz Stadium and the SEC Championship Game. With that in hand, all other possibilities remain in play. That’s right, College Football Playoffs and national championship. Scoff if you like, but that remains these seniors’ objective. “We made a decision; we came back for a reason,” Carter said after the Bulldogs’ practice on Wednesday. “I think we’ve done a pretty good job so far. But all of us seniors – even the underclassmen – we let them know we’re not done yet.” We never got an exact assessment of what The Big Four were told by the NFL when they asked for a draft evaluation after last season. It’s a very formalized and private process nowadays. Essentially, underclassmen can inform the NFL’s college advisory committee that they’re considering foregoing their college eligibility to play professionally. Made up of high-level NFL personnel evaluators and individuals from scouting organizations, the advisory committee then reviews data and video provided by the players and their schools and offer a generalized assessment. They receiver either a “first- or second-round evaluation” or a “stay in school evaluation.” Not everybody accepts their assessment. In 2016, 107 underclassmen entered the draft. Of those, 30 of them went, according to the NFL. Without the benefit of these guys telling us the exact evaluation they received, there’s no way to know how much money The Big Four left on the table. But based on where I’m sitting, it’s at least the number I mentioned above. That’s based on my personal view that each one of these guys would have made an NFL roster, regardless of their draft position. The NFL minimum salary for 2017 is $465,000. Multiply that by four and you get $1.86 million. I don’t know what The Big Four’s presence has meant financially for UGA. I guess you could say without them, the Bulldogs probably aren’t eyeing a “New Year’s Six bowl” and certainly not an SEC Championship Game or playoff berth. All those come with their resident monetary rewards. Intangibly, though, it’s hard to put a number on. “That’s a group of guys that have been really special to me,” said Georgia coach Kirby Smart, who advised the Big Four to come back. “But they’ve been really special to the DawgNation and the legacy they leave behind.” Of course, it’s not just The Big Four who have made the Bulldogs into what they are this season. In fact, there are a bunch of seniors that have contributed to the cause this season. That goes beyond those who receive full-ride, grants-in-aid. Including walkons, there are 31 seniors who will honored during Senior Day before Saturday’s game. Not all of them have been here the last four years, but most of them have. Guys like safety Dominick Sanders, who needs one pick to tie the school record for career interceptions; like Aaron Davis, who has started 41 games, most ever by a non-kicking walkon; or tackle Isaiah Wynn, who has played in all but two games the last four years, most of them starts. Including a year at prep school, John-John Atkins has been pledged to Georgia since 2012, and has likewise been a block of granite for the Bulldogs at noseguard. Together, they’ve amassed a 37-12 record (.755). A couple more wins and they’ll finish among the Top 10 most successful teams of all time, which span 125 years. As for the money, Carter has maintained that it really wasn’t about that for him or the other seniors that came back. “We didn’t go out last year like we wanted to,” he has always maintained. “I feel like I had a lot more to do here so I couldn’t leave yet.” Nevertheless, Carter may have benefited the most in that regard. The 6-foot-6, 250-pound outside linebacker from Norcross has been mentioned as a potential NFL first-rounder for next April. Regardless, each of the Big Four has left an indelible mark on this program: Chubb became just the second rusher in Georgia history to exceed 4,000 career yards and will finish as UGA’s second all-time behind Herschel Walker in rushing yardage, rushing scores (39), and all-purpose yardage (4,669). His 4,318 rushing yards are the fourth most in SEC history. Michel is the fifth-leading rusher in Georgia history with 3,142 yards and could finish as high as third. He’s on pace to finish among the top five in all-purpose yards (3,755) yards as well. Bellamy has played in 33 games, collecting 108 tackles and 19.5 tackles for loss. He ranks third on the team with nine quarterback pressures this season. And Carter, he had a team-high nine tackles and a sack in the 42-7 win over Florida, a couple of huge sacks and fumble recoveries in the win at Notre Dame and 13.5 sacks in his career so far. Except for that stinging loss at Auburn last Saturday, senior year has been nothing but a blast for Carter and his classmates. But it’s not over yet, Carter points out. That’s why, if you’re going to Saturday’s game at Sanford Stadium, you really need to be inside and sitting in your seat by 3 p.m. Kickoff between No. 7 Georgia and Kentucky is not until 3:37 p.m., but setting aside an extra half-hour to honor these 2017 seniors rather than gulping down another cold one will be time well spent. “These guys have meant a lot to this program, meant a lot to me personally, meant a lot to the staff, and they’ve meant a lot to this university,” Smart said. “I think we all owe it to them, as a fan base and as a coaching staff and as a team, to make sure that we give them our best effort.” You can be assured that Georgia’s seniors will be bringing it. The post If ever there was a UGA senior class to see honored, this 2017 bunch is it appeared first on DawgNation.
  • We are on the eve of the final home football game of the Georgia Bulldog season: the seventh-ranked Dogs host the Kentucky Wildcats in tomorrow’s SEC finale. Kickoff for UGA Senior Day is set for 3:30 in Sanford Stadium, with national television on CBS.   The senior ceremony will begin at 3:16 p.m. ET at Sanford Stadium. Kickoff for the Bulldogs’ final home game of the season is set for 3:30 p.m., with the contest nationally televised on the CBS.  The 31 seniors to be recognized are John Atkins, DL, Thomson, Ga.; Davin Bellamy, LB, Stone Mountain, Ga.; Jeb Blazevich, TE, Charlotte, N.C.; Aulden Bynum, OL, Valdosta, Ga.; Lorenzo Carter, LB, Norcross, Ga.; Reggie Carter, LB, Stone Mountain, Ga.; Nick Chubb, RB, Cedartown, Ga.; John Courson, LS, Athens, Ga.; Aaron Davis, DB, Locust Grove, Ga.; Jordan Davis, TE, Thomson, Ga.; Alex Essex, DL, Richmond, Va.; Turner Fortin, RB, Johns Creek, Ga.; Trent Frix, LS, Calhoun, Ga.; Jacob Gross, RB, Thomaston, Ga.; Carson Hall, OL, Dallas, Ga.; Daniel Harper, LB, Atlanta, Ga.; Matthew Herzwurm, LS, Augusta, Ga.; Tim Hill, DB, Atlanta, Ga.; David Marvin, K, Charlotte, N.C.; Miles McGinty, TE, Savannah, Ga.; Sony Michel, RB, Hollywood, Fla.; Cameron Nizialek, P, Chantilly, Va.; Malkom Parrish, DB, Quitman, Ga.; Christian Payne, RB, Athens, Ga.; Brice Ramsey, QB, Kingsland, Ga.; Dominick Sanders, DB, Tucker, Ga.; Dyshon Sims, OL, Valdosta, Ga.;Thomas Swilley, OL, Athens, Ga.; Shakenneth Williams, WR, Macon, Ga.; Javon Wims, WR, Miami, Fla.; Isaiah Wynn, OL, St. Petersburg, Fla.
  • ATHENS — The best thing about what happened to Georgia last week on The Plains and what might happen Saturday against at Kentucky at Sanford Stadium is that the Bulldogs happen to play football with 18-to-22-year-olds. “Kids are more resilient than the adults and the fan base, I can promise you,” explained coach Kirby Smart, talking about the 23-point loss to Auburn on 680 The Fan’s Bulldog Roundtable on Thursday. “They live in a generation of ‘onto the next thing.’ They want 60 seconds; they’re two or three lines on Twitter; they go on SnapChat. That’s all they think about. So for them, it’s onto the next one.” There are some objectives for the Bulldogs beyond just winning the next game. Starting with that ill-fated trip to Auburn, this is the most challenging stretch of the season, and the SEC Championship game awaits, whether Georgia is ready for it or not. It will be paramount that the Bulldogs shore up some things, mentally as well as physically. “It’s important to gain some confidence in how they play, especially early in this game, so that they can get back to believing in themselves. At the end of the day, it’s the next opponent, a good opponent and an SEC opponent, so they’ve got to go out and perform and be ready for a four-quarter battle. I fully expect it to be that way with Kentucky.” Whether it could help or hinder that objective remains to be seen, but the Bulldogs will be honoring a huge group of seniors. They’re led the high-profile foursome of Davin Bellamy, Lorenzo Carter, Nick Chubb and Sony Michel, but there are numerous others who have distinguished themselves with their service in games or in practices. A whopping 31 players will be honored during Senior Day ceremonies, which will start promptly at 3 p.m. That group has logged a 37-12 record over the last four years. With a couple more wins, they have a chance to finish among the Top 10 most successful classes of all time in the 125-year history of Georgia football. “These seniors have been a tremendous asset for our staff,” Smart said. “They’re a lot of high-character kids who care a lot about the University of Georgia. We can give back to them and their families by honoring what they’ve done for the university. Here’s what has to happen to send them out the right way: Back to Bulldog Basics The Bulldogs have to find a way to get back to what had made it successful before Auburn humiliated them 40-17. Primarily, that is establish the run and stop the run. Georgia was overwhelmed in both of those respects against the Tigers, recording season lows in rushing on offense and defense. When Nick Chubb leads the Bulldogs with 27 yards rushing, you know it’s a bad day. There is nothing automatic about being able to do that against the Wildcats. They’re actually similar to Auburn statistically when it comes to stopping the run. They’re fourth in the SEC at 121.9 yards, or 3.5 yards more a game than the Tigers’ vaunted defense. So Georgia has to address its newly-exposed issues on the offensive line. The Bulldogs were experimenting in practice this week with big Ben Cleveland (6-6, 340) getting some looks at left guard. On the flipside, Kentucky already has called out Georgia to some degree. Sophomore Benny Snell promised the Bulldogs that he was going to be “bringing it” against them on Saturday. And he has more than a little something to bring. Snell (5-11, 233) is the SEC’s third-leading rusher (101.3 yards per game) and is coming off his third consecutive game in which he has scored three touchdowns. Snell had 114 yards and two touchdowns against Georgia last year when the Bulldogs eked out a 27-24 victory. Throw the ball downfield As much as the Bulldogs need to establish the run, they also have to prove they can throw the football. They’ve done that with some success this season, but not consistently and certainly not in the fashion that makes a defense respect it and change what they’re doing. Georgia’s freshman quarterback Jake Fromm not only has been extremely good at completing third-down throws and occasionally hitting defenses with big plays in the passing game. His yards per attempt continues to be one of the best in the country. But where the Bulldogs are lacking is in a consistent downfield attack that utilizes the middle of the field and give the safeties something else to think about. To date, most of Fromm’s attempts and completions have come on 50-50 plays against one-on-one coverage in the short to intermediate flat and up and down the sideline. That limits the risk of a turnover within the chaos that is the middle of field. If there’s a team Georgia might be able to exploit in this regard, it’s Kentucky. The Wildcats struggle in pass coverage. In fact, they’re last in the SEC against the pass, allowing 282.3 yards per game and giving up 18 touchdowns through the air.It may be time for Georgia offensive coordinator Jim Chaney to show more trust in the freshman Jake Fromm and let him try to exploit the middle of the defense. This, in turn, could get the Bulldogs’ impressive group of tight ends more involved in the passing game. Tighten up special teams It could be argued that Georgia has won the special teams matchup in every game it played this season. Well, up until last week’s game at Auburn. Actually, the Bulldogs remained dominant when came to the act of kicking and returning kicks. But they were flagged for two devastating personal-foul penalties on special teams plays, committed a turnover and missed a field goal. That undid all the good work displayed by return specialist Mecole Hardman, who had 183 yards in returns but muffed a punt that led to an early second-half touchdown by the Tigers. Kentucky is decidedly average on special teams, and is especially vulnerable on kickoff returns. This area of Saturday’s matchup is a clear advantage for the Bulldogs, and one of which they need to take full advantage. The post Planning for Opponent: Millennial mentality should serve Dawgs well vs. Kentucky appeared first on DawgNation.