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    The Florida residence tennis star Venus Williams calls home was burglarized as she played in the U.S. Open in September, according to a Palm Beach Gardens police report released Thursday. >> Watch the news report here Though what was taken from the home at BallenIsles Country Club is redacted from the report, police indicate more than $400,000 worth of items were taken from the residence. >> Serena Williams shares wedding photos in new interview Palm Beach Gardens police indicate in the report that the last time the items were known to be in the home was Sept. 1, the day Williams’s sister, Serena, gave birth to her first daughter, Alexis Olympia Ohanian Jr. That was the same day Williams beat Greek tennis player Maria Sakkari in the U.S. Open in New York. Williams made it to the semifinals where she lost to U.S. player Sloane Stephens in three sets on Sept. 7. The burglary was reported on Sept. 5, according to the report. >> Read more trending news  This is not the first time this year Williams has been part of a Palm Beach Gardens police report. On June 9, Williams collided with Linda and Jerome Barson at an intersection near her home. Jerome Barson died weeks later from complication of blunt traumatic injuries. Williams was not charged in the crash, but Barson’s family has filed a civil lawsuit against her.
  • The Latest on Zimbabwe's political turmoil (all times local):9:10 a.m.Zimbabwe's parliament will 'definitely' put in motion a process to impeach President Robert Mugabe, the main opposition's parliamentary chief whip says, adding that they have been in discussions with the ruling ZANU-PF party to act jointly.Innocent Gonese with the MDC-T party tells The Associated Press: 'If Mugabe is not gone by Tuesday, then as sure as the sun rises from the east, impeachment process will kick in.'The MDC-T has unsuccessfully tried to impeach Mugabe in the past, but now the ruling party has turned against him.The ruling party on Sunday is likely to fire Mugabe as party leader at a Central Committee meeting. State-run media also says Mugabe will meet the army commander who put him under house arrest for another round of talks.___8:45 a.m.Clinging to his now-powerless post, longtime Zimbabwe President Robert Mugabe is set to discuss his expected exit with the army commander who put him under house arrest.And a day after huge crowds rallied in the capital for Mugabe to go, the ruling party's Central Committee is expected to meet Sunday on demands by provincial branches to recall Mugabe as party leader.The meeting also is expected to reinstate the vice president whose firing nearly two weeks ago led the military to step in.Mugabe's talks with army commander Constantino Chiwenga are the second round of negotiations on an exit with a veneer of dignity as the military tries to avoid accusations of a coup.This time, the talks do not appear to include a South African government delegation.
  • Tristan Vizcaino hit a 38-yard field goal as time expired and No. 16 Washington scored 10 points in the final 58 seconds to stun Utah 33-30 on Saturday night.Washington (9-2, 6-2 Pac-12, No. 18 CFP) pulled even at 30-all on Myles Gaskin's 2-yard TD run with 58 seconds remaining. After Utah punted, Washington got the ball back with 29 seconds at its own 28. Washington QB Jake Browning hit Dante Pettis for 18 yards to near midfield, and then the big play was a 31-yard strike to Andre Baccellia to the Utah 22 with 8 seconds left. Washington took one shot at the end zone that was incomplete before Vizcaino made his second field goal of the game. Vizcaino had missed from 30 yards and missed an extra point.'I was exciting running out there, excited for the opportunity,' Vizcaino said. 'It's a huge deal. I've let my teammates down a couple games in the past and being able to bounce back and maybe make it up to them tonight, it meant a lot to me. ... One of the best feelings you could have as a kicker, if not the best.'Browning was 26-of-35 passing for 354 yards and two touchdowns while Gaskin had two TD runs and a 76-yard touchdown reception.Utah's Tyler Huntley threw for 293 yards and two touchdowns, ran for another 48 yards and a touchdown, and his big second half had the Utes (5-6, 2-6) in position for an upset and bowl eligibility.Browning was even better in the closing minutes.Washington took possession with 2:03 left at its own 39. Browning misfired on his first three passes, but on fourth down he found Baccellia for 14 yards. Browning then hit his next four throws, including a 28-yard strike to Will Dissly to the Utah 2. Gaskin scored on the next play, and the extra point tied it.After Utah went three-and-out, Utes coach Kyle Whittingham called timeout with 23 seconds left after Gaskin was stopped on a 2-yard run. Browning hit the next two throws, and Utah was left walking off with a shocking loss.'Just needed to find a way to make one more play there at the end,' Whittingham said.The night appeared to be a complete thud for Washington. The Huskies lost out on a chance to repeat as Pac-12 North champions earlier Saturday night when Stanford held off California, knocking them out of the division race. The best Washington can do now is complete a second straight 10-win season and more importantly end rival Washington State's hopes for the Pac-12 North title.If the Cougars beat the Huskies next Saturday, Washington State plays in the Pac-12 title game. If the Huskies win, then it's Stanford.'I saw it on the scoreboard but I still want to win. Having a 10-win season would be pretty cool,' Browning said.Utah was the one playing as though a division title was at stake.Whittingham pulled out all the tricks. He called an onside kick in the first half that was successful, and even more daringly called a fake punt facing fourth-and-17 from his own 27 early in the fourth quarter. Punter Mitch Wishnowsky kept the ball and barely got the first down.The fake punt proved to be a critical decision. Huntley hit Jake Jackson for 39 yards later in the drive to the Washington 5, and Huntley scored on the next play to give the Utes a 30-23 lead with 10:52 remaining.THE TAKEAWAYUtah: Despite missing a pair of starters on defense due to injury, Utah managed to hold Washington's run game in check. The Huskies finished with 123 yards rushing, but while Gaskin had a big night receiving, he managed just 52 yards rushing. ... Utah became the first team to score 30 points on Washington at home since the Utes did it two years ago in a 34-23 win.Washington: Despite only being juniors, Browning and Gaskin took over the top spots in Washington's record book. Gaskin's 9-yard TD run in the first quarter was the 38th of his career, moving him one ahead of Bishop Sankey for most in school history. Browning also took the top spot for career passing TDs when Lavon Coleman took his dump off pass and found his way into the end zone in the second quarter. It was Browning's 76th career TD, passing Keith Price on the career list.UP NEXTUtah: The Utes close out the regular season hosting Colorado next Saturday.Washington: The Huskies face rival Washington State in the Apple Cup next Saturday.___More AP college football: www.collegefootball.ap.org and www.twitter.com/AP_Top25
  • Clinging to his now virtually powerless post, longtime Zimbabwe President Robert Mugabe on Sunday was set to discuss his expected exit with the army commander who put him under house arrest, while the ruling party prepared to recall the world's oldest head of state as its leader.A day after huge crowds rallied peacefully in the capital, Harare, for the 93-year-old Mugabe to go, the ruling party's Central Committee was expected to meet Sunday on demands by provincial branches to recall him. It also was expected to reinstate the vice president whose firing nearly two weeks ago led the military to step in, and recall the unpopular first lady as head of the women's league.That former vice president, Emmerson Mnangagwa, is expected to lead a new government. Without the military's intervention, first lady Grace Mugabe likely would have replaced him as vice president and been in a position to succeed her husband.Impeaching the president is another step when Parliament resumes Tuesday, and lawmakers will 'definitely' put the process in motion, the main opposition's parliamentary chief whip told The Associated Press.Innocent Gonese with the MDC-T party said they had been in discussions with the ruling ZANU-PF party to act jointly.'If Mugabe is not gone by Tuesday, then as sure as the sun rises from the east, impeachment process will kick in,' Gonese said. The MDC-T has unsuccessfully tried to impeach Mugabe in the past.Mugabe's talks with army commander Constantino Chiwenga are the second round of negotiations on an exit with a veneer of dignity as the military tries to avoid accusations of a coup. The discussions come ahead of a key ruling party congress next month, as well as scheduled elections next year. Mugabe is said to be asking for more time.Sunday's negotiations do not appear to include the South African government delegation that took part in the first round. South Africa's president on Saturday said talks are in 'early days.' The southern African regional bloc will hold a four-country summit in Angola on Tuesday to discuss the Zimbabwe situation.Mugabe finds himself increasingly isolated under house arrest in his lavish Blue Roof mansion, deserted by most of his allies, with others arrested.On Saturday, most of Harare's population poured into the streets in an anti-Mugabe demonstration that just days ago would have brought a police crackdown.They clambered onto tanks moving slowly through the crowds, danced around soldiers and surged in the thousands toward the State House building where Mugabe held official functions, a symbol of the rule of the man who took power after independence from white minority rule in 1980.The euphoria came after years of watching the once-prosperous African nation fall into decay, with a collapsing economy, repression of free speech, disputed elections and international sanctions.Even as concerns remained about who next would be in charge and what freedoms might be available if the military lingers in power — or if Mnangagwa succeeds his longtime ally Mugabe as leader — people reveled in the rare chance to express themselves freely.Let us have this moment, Zimbabweans said. If the next leader becomes trouble, they vowed to return to the streets again.
  • LaToya Cantrell, a City Council member who first gained a political following as she worked to help her hard-hit neighborhood recover from Hurricane Katrina, won a historic election Saturday that made her the first woman mayor of New Orleans.The Democrat will succeed term-limited fellow Democrat Mitch Landrieu as the city celebrates its 300th anniversary next year.'Almost 300 years, my friends. And New Orleans, we're still making history,' Cantrell told a cheering crowd in her victory speech.The leader in most polls before the runoff election, she never trailed as votes were counted.Her opponent, former municipal Judge Desiree Charbonnet, conceded the race and congratulated Cantrell late Saturday. Later, complete returns showed Cantrell with 60 percent of the vote.'I do not regret one moment of anything about this campaign,' Charbonnet said.The two women led a field of 18 candidates in an October general election to win runoff spots.Landrieu earned credit for accelerating the recovery from Hurricane Katrina in an administration cited for reduced blight, improvements in the celebrated tourism economy and economic development that included last week's announcement that a digital services company is bringing 2,000 new jobs to the city.But Cantrell will face lingering problems. Crime is one. Another is dysfunction at the agency overseeing the city's drinking water system and storm drainage — a problem that became evident during serious flash flooding in August.About 32 percent of city voters took part in last month's election. It was unclear whether turnout would surpass that on Saturday.Cantrell faced questions about her use of a city credit card. Charbonnet had to fight back against critics who cast her as an insider who would steer city work to cronies.Katrina was a theme in the backstory of both candidates. Cantrell moved to the city from California. Her work as a neighborhood activist in the aftermath of Katrina in the hard-hit Broadmoor neighborhood helped her win a seat on council in 2012.Charbonnet, from a well-known political family in New Orleans, was the city's elected recorder of mortgages before she was a judge. In the campaign she made a point of saying hers was the first city office to re-open after Katrina, providing critical property records to the displaced.Cantrell entered the race as the perceived front-runner, leading in fundraising and in various polls. She had an 11 percentage point lead in a poll released last week by the University of New Orleans. It showed 46 percent of 602 voters surveyed from Nov. 1-8 favored Cantrell over Charbonnet, who had 35 percent; 20 percent were undecided.Former state civil court Judge Michael Bagneris, who finished third in last month's race, endorsed Cantrell, as did Troy Henry, a businessman who also ran for the post last month.UNO political science professor Edward Chervenak said the endorsements appeared to help Cantrell overcome revelations that she had used her city-issued credit card for thousands of dollars in purchases without clear indications that they were for public purposes. The money was eventually reimbursed but questions lingered about whether she had improperly used city money for personal or campaign expenditures.Voters also made history in a New Orleans City Council race.Cyndi Nguyen defeated incumbent James Gray in an eastern New Orleans district. An immigrant who fled Vietnam with her family when she was 5 in 1975, Nguyen is the organizer of a nonprofit and will be the first Vietnamese-American to serve on the council.
  • They may have intellectual or developmental disabilities, but that doesn't mean that the former high school students taking part in a TSYS intern program can't learn new things and dream big just like anyone else.'I want to be a veterinarian,' exclaimed Nick Brundidge from Shaw High during a recent visit to the TSYS North Center card production facility in Columbus. Another has hopes of being a doctor, one wants to join the U.S. Army, and a third is looking forward to one day having a wife, kids, house and car.They all are part of a national program called Project SEARCH that was launched in 1996 with the goal of helping young people with disabilities learn meaningful skills that they can use both in life and the workforce. The ultimate goal is for graduates to land a good-paying job with a solid company such as TSYS, which currently is the only local participant in the program.'These children, or interns, come out of a self-contained classroom — they were escorted and chaperoned and protected their whole 13 years of school,' said Loretta Fuller, a Muscogee County School District special education teacher who also is an instructor in the program. 'Then they come out here and we teach them in nine months how to be responsible for themselves.'This is the second class to take part in the internship training at TSYS, with the first group graduating last spring at the company's corporate headquarters downtown. There were five graduates then, with eight former students participating in the current class that will include three 10-week sessions leading to their own graduation next May.Pino Wells Davis is the TSYS business liaison working with Project SEARCH, which also involves Easter Seals West Georgia and the Georgia Vocational Rehabilitation Agency. Thus far, the credit-card and payment processor is the only host-site participant in the Columbus area and one of 21 Georgia employers taking part in program. There are about 500 nationwide.'I think to whom much is given much is required, and TSYS is truly a blessed company,' Davis responded when asked why TSYS is involved in the effort. 'We have so many wonderful resources and great team members who are always looking for an opportunity to give back to others, especially within the communities in which we live. And this is such a brilliant opportunity for us.'Nationally, 33 percent of graduates are hired by the host site, with the remaining 67 percent taking a job with another employer in their community. Of those who made it through the program earlier this year, three are now manual operators in the mailroom area at the TSYS card production and statement facility off Moon Road. Another is with a third-party vendor, Southern Management.Cynthia Rodriguez is among those now fully employed with the technology company, working with machinery that sorts credit-card statements bound for customers throughout the U.S.'It was pretty hard at first, because I didn't know how to do it very well,' she said of her work, which she enjoys because of the interaction she has with colleagues. Asked what she would be doing if not for the program, Rodriguez said she likely would be looking for a job somewhere, probably with Walmart or something similar.Fuller said those selected for Project SEARCH go through a process which includes a referral from their school or family members or a vocational rehabilitation counselor. There are interviews and hands-on assessments for the opportunity to learn under a certified instructor and eventually jump into on-the-job training at a workplace for four hours or so each weekday.'We take children that are moderately disabled. We don't take the higher functioning ones,' she said. 'We get the children who need the most assistance to get a job.'Rayshun Grant, who came from Kendrick High School, is one of the current crop of intern participants. He ticked off the things he already is learning in the program. They include basics such as following the rules and wearing appropriate attire, but also picking up skills such as the use of Microsoft PowerPoint and Publisher, and creating a Google email account.'We learn how to work together, respect each other and how to get along,' he said. 'We need to learn how to take good care of ourselves, because we're not children anymore, we're adults. Project SEARCH is a place that can help you be more independent, and how to take full responsibility for ourself.'Working with and keeping an eye on Grant and others in the program is TSYS employee and mentor Jimmie Walker, himself a manual operator in the mailroom. Duties include sorting and processing mail, as well as delivering and picking up packages. Walker noted his own grandson is autistic, which means he wants the program to be around for him when it's time to get ready for a job.'I enjoy doing it, and teaching young folks things other than a job,' Walker said. 'We talk about the workplace, how you dress, how you interview. We talk about hygiene. We talk about eating. We talk about home life, because if you've got a messed-up home life, you're not going to be thinking about work and being focused.'Davis said part of the beauty of the program is the interns learn skills some people without disabilities can take for granted, such as being punctual and in the right place at the proper moment. They're taught responsibility and the need to stay focused on the job, which in the case of the TSYS mailroom can mean processing millions upon millions of credit cards and statements each year.'You can see that they have rather serious jobs,' she said. 'It's not just busywork, and that's what we're committed to ... Their day-to-day jobs are meaningful jobs here that we need to have done at TSYS.'Taking part in a tour at the TSYS facility was Georgia Rep. Carolyn Hugley of Columbus, who was first elected in 1992 to her district, which includes southeast Muscogee County. She called the program fabulous.'It's wonderful for the young people to have the opportunity to build on the skills that they've learned in high school, and come here and make the transition from high school to work and setting goals and being part of a team,' she said.Those in the current Project SEARCH class are Deshunte Banks of Carver High, Nick Brundidge of Shaw High, Rashaan Davis of Northside High, Darrius Elias of Carver High, Tionna Evans of Carver/Shaw High, Reuben Stephen of Spencer High and Sam Thomas of Northside High.Aside from Rodriguez, the first class graduates now working at TSYS are Anthony McCommons and Kiara Willis, while Zach Motycka is employed with Southern Management.
  • The winning numbers in Saturday evening's drawing of the Georgia Lottery's 'Cash 3 Night' game were:7-1-0(seven, one, zero)
  • After Sam Darnold met up with Josh Rosen at midfield, the Southern California quarterback climbed the stepladder for possibly the final time, holding the sword aloft and leading the Trojans' band while the student section chanted: 'One more year!'If Darnold had just played his last collegiate game at the Coliseum, he went out with a particularly sweet victory — even though he wasn't the biggest star of a workmanlike win over UCLA.Darnold passed for 264 yards and ran for a touchdown, and No. 12 USC persevered for its third consecutive victory over its crosstown rivals, 28-23 on Saturday night.Although he threw one interception and failed to get a touchdown pass for the third time this season, Darnold made enough steady plays to keep USC in front of UCLA (5-6, 3-5).'Beating UCLA, keeping the Victory Bell here, and just staying undefeated at home for the last two years, it's a huge accomplishment,' Darnold said.Ronald Jones II rushed for 122 yards and two touchdowns, and Michael Pittman Jr. returned a punt 72 yards for a touchdown on a spectacular trick play in the first quarter of the regular-season finale for the Pac-12 South champion Trojans (10-2, 8-1).Rosen passed for 421 yards and hit Jordan Lasley for three touchdowns in the first — and probably only — collegiate meeting between Los Angeles' star quarterbacks. Lasley had 10 catches for 204 yards.Darnold and Rosen left their high schools on opposite sides of the LA area three seasons ago, but hadn't yet played against each other due to Darnold's redshirt year in 2015 and Rosen's shoulder injury in 2016. With dozens of NFL scouts and executives in the Coliseum, Darnold and Rosen both looked sharp — but Darnold's receivers and running game came up bigger while UCLA fell behind early and couldn't catch up.'We're not technically battling against each other, because I'm going against their defense,' Darnold said. 'But I think it's awesome to be able to battle against a great player like Josh.'Even after wrapping up a spot in the conference title game with a win at Colorado last week, USC finished strong in the crosstown showdown with its 16th consecutive victory at the Coliseum, including every game with Clay Helton as its head coach and Darnold as the starting quarterback.'I thought our kids did what was needed to be done in a hard-fought ballgame,' Helton said.USC mounted a 90-yard drive midway through the fourth quarter, with Jones' second TD run capping it. Rosen then found Lasley for a 27-yard score with 2:43 to play, but his 2-point conversion pass was too high for Lasley.USC recovered an onside kick and ran out the clock on the final home game for the Trojans' seniors — and possibly for their NFL-caliber underclassmen including Darnold and Jones.'Not great. I really thought we won this game,' Rosen said when asked how he felt about the Bruins' play. 'We executed how we want. We were even making field goals. Missed a field goal, two turnovers — that's what, nine points right there? We lost by five. Another touchdown called back for a chop (block). It's just frustrating.'THE TAKEAWAYUCLA: UCLA is unbeaten at the Rose Bowl this season, but went 0-6 on the road, even after performing fairly well against the Trojans. The season comes down to next week's visit from California (5-6, 2-6), with the winner of the UC rivalry game gaining bowl eligibility.USC: The Trojans showed tenacity and resilience, finishing the regular season strong instead of taking the night off. The defense will be pleased by another encouraging performance heading to the league title game against Washington State or Stanford.FAKE OUTLess than six minutes in, the Trojans pulled off a remarkable special-teams trick for their first touchdown. When UCLA's Stefan Flintoft angled a long punt toward the USC sideline, the Trojans ran back toward the center of the field to block for Ajene Harris, who pretended to catch an invisible ball while Pittman scampered down the far sideline, eluded a tackle and scored.'It went exactly how we expected,' Pittman said.BIG PICKUCLA had a chance to shift momentum right after halftime with a drive deep into USC territory, but Marvell Tell III came up with an end-zone interception. Rosen was particularly frustrated with that throw. 'Just stupid mistakes,' Rosen said. 'I didn't see Marvell on the field. I thought it was a touchdown when I threw it. Then I peeked a little bit and (said), 'Man, guess I've got to play defense now.''COMEBACK ROUTEDarnold claims he won't decide whether to head to the NFL until after the season. USC fans still have hope he'll return for a third season under center, as evidenced by their 'One more year!' chants.'I'm not going to say anything about that,' Darnold said with a grin.UP NEXTUCLA: Host California on Friday possibly without running back Bolu Olorunfunmi, who could be out after picking up an unspecified injury against USC.USC: After a week off, the Pac-12 championship game in Santa Clara, California, on Dec. 1.___More AP college football: www.collegefootball.ap.org and www.twitter.com/AP_Top25
  • The winning numbers in Saturday evening's drawing of the Georgia Lottery's 'Cash 4 Night' game were:0-8-9-3(zero, eight, nine, three)
  • Billionaire businessman Sebastian Pinera is heavily favored to top Sunday's election backed by Chileans who hope the former president can resuscitate a flagging economy, but polls suggest he won't get enough votes to avoid a runoff.The world's top copper producing country has been hurt by lower international prices and demand for the metal that is the backbone of its economy.The Harvard-educated entrepreneur is proposing to cut taxes on businesses to promote growth and promises to launch a $14 billion, four-year spending plan that includes fresh investments in infrastructure.Pinera, 67, struggled with large protests over inequality and education during his 2010-2014 presidency and he ended his term with low popularity ratings. But the economic slump and overall disenchantment with the center-left government of President Michelle Bachelet has given him a boost in this election.Bachelet was Chile's most popular president during her first 2006-2010 term, but she is ending her 2014-2018 presidency as the least popular. In addition to economic woes, her image was hurt by a real estate scandal involving her family, though no charges were brought.Pinera is also expected to be aided by lower turnout as voting was made voluntary rather than mandatory in 2012. He may also be favored by a fractured center-left coalition that has been questioned by Chileans who feel Bachelet wavered in her promises of profound social changes in labor and education.Polls give Pinera a wide margin over his nearest competitor, center-left Sen. Alejandro Guillier, but not enough for him to win the election outright. If no candidate gets more than 50 percent of the vote it heads to a runoff between the two top vote-getters. Six other candidates are also running in the election.Guillier, a 64-year-old former journalist, promises to continue Bachelet's plan to increase corporate taxes to partly pay for an education overhaul, reform the constitution and improve the pension and health care system. He also wants to diversify Chile's resources and develop alternative sources of energy to lower investment costs.The elections also choose 155 members of the lower House of Congress and 23 seats are up for grabs in the Senate.

Local News

  • A manhunt is underway in Hall County for a man and woman accused of shooting at two police officers.  Gainesville police told Channel 2 Action News the incident happened along Athens Street at Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard Friday evening. Investigators asked people nearby to lock their doors and report any suspicious activity to police. Police told Channel 2's Steve Gehlbach  they are looking for Marcos Tovar, 20, and Alondra Rodriguez, 20. When officers responded to a suspicious persons call, police told Channel 2 Action News Tovar and Rodriguez started fighting with an officer. That's when police said Rodriguez pulled out a gun and pistol whipped an officer in the head.  TRENDING STORIES: Another cheating scandal: APS police chief disciplines 17 officers, dispatcher Lawsuit: Sun Dial restaurant ‘had no protections' to stop 5-year-old's death Woman carjacked, kidnapped while pumping gas Backup arrived and that's when Gainesville police said both suspects fired at two officers. They returned fire. 'They actively went after police officers with gunfire, so we know that they are dangerous,' said Gainesville Police Sgt. Kevin Holbrook. The police department said the officers were transported to the hospital due to minor injuries, but have since been released.  Neighbors said they ducked for cover when they heard gunfire.  'I was like boom, boom, boom, at least six or seven shots,' neighbors Shenna Johnson said. 'I just started screaming for my kids. I was terrified.' The Georgia Bureau of Investigation has been called in to help with the investigation. They said both Tovar and Rodriguez are considered to be 'armed and dangerous.
  • A University of Georgia student was arrested early Thursday morning after a high-speed chase in Athens. According to police, Hunter Ty Wilkerson, 19, reached speeds of 110 mph during the chase before he was eventually taken into custody. They said he was speeding because he had just stolen five traffic signs off the UGA campus. Athens-Clarke County police got involved when they noticed Wilkerson going 90 mph in a 35-mph zone around 3:30 a.m. 'At that point in itself he's reckless. He's putting lives in danger, to include his own and anyone else who's on the roadway,' said Epifanio Rodriguez with the Athens-Clarke County Police Department. TRENDING STORIES: Another cheating scandal: APS police chief disciplines 17 officers, dispatcher Lawsuit: Sun Dial restaurant ‘had no protections' to stop 5-year-old's death Woman carjacked, kidnapped while pumping gas Police said the chase began on Milledge Avenue and ended less than 10 minutes later when Wilkerson's truck went airborne. It crashed into several cars parked in front of the UGA police headquarters on Oconee Street. Police bodycam video obtained by Channel 2 Action News shows several officers taking the suspect into custody. Police said Wilkerson was on Snapchat during the chase. 'An officer looks through his phone and sees he was active on social media, Snapchat, and was sending out updates saying that he was in a pursuit with the police officer,' Rodriguez said. Wilkerson faces 25 charges, including fleeing a police officer, DUI and reckless driving.
  • Going to Athens and watching the Dawgs 'between the hedges' is one of the best ways to spend a Saturday. Sure, we may be biased, but there are very few environments like it in the country. According to a recent ranking by “For the Win,” the University of Georgia was ranked the second-best college football town in America. TRENDING STORIES: Lawsuit: Sun Dial restaurant ‘had no protections' to stop 5-year-old's death Police: Man who stole Chick-fil-A catering van taken into custody WSB-TV plans extensive coverage of the Georgia Dome demolition “For the Win” tracked social media activity among college football fans to create the rankings. “Come for the great music scene, stay for the football,” the rankings said about UGA. Georgia was beaten only by the University of Wisconsin in Madison. The Texas Longhorns in Austin, the LSU Tigers in Baton Rouge and the Michigan Wolverines in Ann Arbor rounded out the top 5. CLICK HERE to see the complete rankings. Information from JuliaKate E. Culpepper, The Atlanta Journal-Constitution, was used in this report.
  • It can happen in the branch office or the boardroom. Volkswagen did it to pass emissions tests. Wells-Fargo did it to squeeze more profits from their customers. Some school districts have it done it to boost their standardized test scores. Workplace cheating is a real and troublesome phenomenon, and new research from the University of Georgia explains how it starts-and how employers can help prevent it. 'It's the desire for self-protection that primarily causes employees to cheat,' said Marie Mitchell (pictured), an associate professor of management in UGA's Terry College of Business. 'Employees want to look valuable and productive, especially if they think their job is at risk.' In a recently published paper in the Journal of Applied Psychology, Mitchell and her co-authors examined performance pressure in the workplace and the behaviors that result from it. They found when employees feel their job depends on meeting high benchmarks, some fudge results in order to stay employed. For example, when Wells Fargo employees were told to meet new goals that included opening sky-high numbers of new accounts, thousands began to open fraudulent accounts in order to meet their quotas. Wells Fargo was fined $185 million in 2016 and publicly scorned as a result. Similar scenarios can play out across all industries, Mitchell said. 'We've seen it in finance, we've seen it with educators and test scores, we've seen it in sports, it's everywhere,' she said. 'Performance pressure elicits cheating when employees feel threatened. Even though there is the potential of getting a good payoff if they heighten their performance, there's also significant awareness that if they don't, their job is going to be at risk.' This is especially true when employees feel they cannot meet expectations any other way. That perception leads to anger, which in turn leads to unethical behavior, Mitchell said. This crucible of pressure and anger causes employees to focus on doing what is beneficial to them-even if it harms others. 'Angry and self-serving employees turn to cheating to meet performance demands. It's understandable,' Mitchell said. 'There's a cycle in which nothing is ever good enough today. Even if you set records last month, you may get told to break them again this month. People get angry about that, and their self-protective reflex is elicited almost subconsciously.' An expert on 'dark side' behaviors and a former human resources manager, Mitchell has been interested in cheating phenomena since her graduate school days. 'There were individuals in law school who would race to get to law journals before anyone else and tear out certain pages so that other students couldn't be as prepared in class,' she said. 'So I know cheating happens. I've seen it. But the research on this has taken place in behavioral labs, and that doesn't always translate well to the workplace. I wanted to find out a bit more about what actually happens at work.' To do so, her research team devised three studies. The first created a measure of workplace cheating behavior through a nationwide survey that asked participants about cheating behavior at work-what it is and if they'd seen it. The second and third studies were time-separated field surveys in which employees were asked about their performance pressure at one point in time, then were asked about their feelings and perceptions of the pressure and their cheating behaviors about a month later. The findings led to a breakthrough. The key, Mitchell said, is for managers to understand the potential threat of performance pressure to employees. If they coach employees on how to view pressure as non-threatening and focus on how to enhance performance ethically, cheating may be prevented. 'It could be that if you pair performance pressure with ethical standards and give employees the right kind of assurance within the workplace, it can actually motivate great performance,' she said. 'There have been many scholars who have argued that you need to stretch your employees because it motivates them, makes them step outside of their normal boxes and be more creative. Our research says that it could, but it also might cause them to act unethically.' The paper, 'Cheating Under Pressure: A Self-Protection Model of Workplace Cheating Behavior,' was co-authored by Michael D. Baer of Arizona State University, Maureen L. Ambrose and Robert Folger of the University of Central Florida and Noel F. Palmer of the University of Nebraska-Kearney.
  • A ceremony is set for 11 o’clock this morning at the courthouse in downtown Athens: they’ll unveil the official portrait of former State Court Chief Judge Kent Lawrence. From the Athens-Clarke County Public Information Office... Athens-Clarke County State Court Judges Ethelyn N. Simpson and Charles E Auslander will host a portrait unveiling ceremony in honor of former State Court Chief Judge N. Kent Lawrence at 11:00 a.m. on November 17, 2017 at the Athens-Clarke County Courthouse, 325 East Washington Street, Athens.    The judges of Athens-Clarke County will dedicate the portrait of Judge Lawrence, which was commissioned by the Western Circuit Bar Association and painted by Ms. Suzanne Royal, to hang in the State Court Courtroom of the Athens-Clarke County Courthouse. A reception will be held prior to the ceremony at 10:00 a.m. in the Courthouse Atrium, located on the 2nd floor.   Judge Lawrence presided over State Court from 1985 until his retirement in 2011 and was the founder of the DUI/Drug Court, which was the first DUI Court in the state of Georgia and one of the first nationwide. In the Athens DUI/Drug Court program, participants are held strictly accountable for their behavior. The participants are on intensive probation supervision, take frequent drug and alcohol screens, and participate in intense substance abuse treatment. Participants typically spend 14 to 20 months in the program.    Since 2001, the DUI/Drug Court has had over 300 participants successfully graduate from the program. In 2012, Judge Lawrence received the National Center for DWI Courts (NCDC) Leadership Award, the highest national honor, in recognition of his vision and commitment in the field of DUI courts. The DUI Court has been recognized as one of only four DWI Academy Courts in the United States, an honor bestowed by the NCDC in partnership with the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA). As an NCDC Academy Court, the Athens DUI/Drug Court helps to develop, identify, and test national best practices for DWI Courts, including answering questions, providing advice and hosting visitors, including court teams from other jurisdictions participating in training.    While nationally Judge Lawrence may be best known for his tireless efforts in promoting and starting accountability courts, he was best known for the first half of his life for his outstanding accomplishments as a University of Georgia football player. Lawrence’s service for the Athens’ community began shortly after an injury ended his football career and he returned to the University of Georgia to pursue a Master’s in Education.    When given the opportunity to work in law enforcement while being a student, Lawrence seized it. He worked as a University of Georgia police officer, then moved on to working as a detective within the UGAPD followed by serving as the first Police Chief of Clarke County in 1974. Judge Lawrence attended the Law School of Atlanta by working during the day, then making the two-hour round trip to school in Atlanta every night. After graduation, Lawrence worked with a private firm in Athens, then as a prosecutor under Harry Gordon, the former District Attorney for Athens-Clarke County. In 1985, Lawrence was appointed by Governor Joe Frank Harris as State Court Judge of Clarke County where he served for 26 years.

Bulldog News

  • ATHENS – Nick Chubb wasn’t himself Saturday. Oh, he ran hard and he gained a lot of yards and he scored some touchdowns. That we’ve all seen before. What we haven’t seen was Chubb celebrating and dancing. Well, sort of dancing. He climbed up on top of the cheerleaders’ platform in front of the UGA student section and celebrated Georgia’s 42-13 win over Kentucky with Sony Michel and the Bulldogs’ other seniors. Arm-in-arm, they sang and cheered and barked and laughed a little and smiled a lot and posed for a few thousand pictures. “Believe it or not, that was my first time ever doing that,” Chubb said in a postgame interview underneath the East End grandstands at Sanford Stadium. “I kind of saved it up for this moment.” Oh, we believe it, Nick. It was unlike anything we’ve seen before from the usually stoic tailback. For 42 games at Georgia, we’ve watched him smile and wave politely to the crowd as he jogged off the field after another one of his 100-yard rushing nights. No matter the gravity of the victory or how much he contributed to it, Chubb was never one to jump up in the stands or even dance some kind of jig. Usually, he’d slap a few hands on his way to the nearest field exit and maybe toss a sweatband or some gloves a kid’s way. “I had to convince him,” Michel, his roommate and backfield mate, said afterward. “It’s hard to convince him to do things like that.” It’s about time the kid showed some emotion. He deserved it. There was much to celebrate on this unseasonably warm and fuzzy Senior Night, much of it Chubb’s on doing. Let’s review. So he busted loose on a 55-yard touchdown run. That was a season-long run and gave Chubb 45 rushing TDs for his career (12 for the season).  That moves him to second on Georgia’s all-time list behind Herschel Walker (52), a theme you’re going to hear a lot in this space. That was Chubb’s second TD of the night, making it the 14th time he’s scored two or more in a game. That run also put him at 151 yards on the evening, making it the 23rd time he’s gone over the century mark. And it also put him over 1,000 yards for the season. He has 1,045 yards this year, so he stands now with Walker as the only two backs in Georgia history with three 1,000-yard seasons. It seems appropriate to interject here that Chubb had 747 yards when his sophomore season ended after five games with a knee injury. Else, he would’ve had four. “It’s an honor,” Chubb said of sharing a few more marks with Herschel. “That’s great company to have. Just to be with him, me and him, man, I’m happy about that.” You might note that it’s now really the only comparison to make with Chubb anymore, him and Herschel Walker. He’s eclipsed everybody else in Georgia history. What’s more, he’s doing it in this day and age. Not to take anything away from Walker or Bo Jackson or Marcus Dupree or any of those guys who thought nothing of carrying the ball 30 times a week. Chubb is doing what he’s doing in an era when SEC defenses don’t fall far down from NFL squads in terms of athletic pedigree and dedication to stuffing the run. And he’s also doing during a time in which coaches prefer their back share carries with others. While Chubb enters the 12th game of his fourth season with 686 carries, his best buddy Michel has 546 himself. That’s what I was thinking about when I asked Georgia coach Kirby Smart if he thought Chubb is underappreciated in terms of national acclaim. Smart went on a rant. “Yeah, I certainly feel like he’s underappreciated,” he said. “I don’t know how you guys feel but I appreciate what he’s done in an era where rushing the ball is really, really hard. It’s gotten harder and harder and harder. I’ve got no statistics to prove it but I’d venture to say Herschel ran for his (yards) in an era where a people were rushing the ball for a lot of yards. I’m not diminishing what Herschel did. I’m just enlightening people to Nick Chubb has rushed for three thousand-yard seasons in the SEC, the toughest conference in the country to run the ball. That’s pretty remarkable. “And he did alongside another back that is maybe just as talented as he is. What would he have done with 30 or 40 carries? Who knows. But I’m sure his body appreciates it.” Everybody is starting to appreciate a little more. It’s kind of like the old adage, you don’t really appreciate something or somebody until they’re gone. Well, Chubb’s not gone yet, but he’s almost out the door. Saturday was his last game in Sanford Stadium. He was one of 31 seniors the Bulldogs honored during Senior Day ceremonies before the game. That, Chubb said afterward, already had him feeling a little different before the game. He blamed Georgia’s slow start Saturday on those emotional proceedings, a rite of passage for seniors playing their last game between the hedges. The Bulldogs finally shook loose from its early doldrums. They needed Jake Fromm to hit a few passes downfield to get the running game going. When it finally did, it was devastating to Kentucky’s overmatched defense. Chubb’s teammates sensed something from him on Saturday. He seemed a little quicker, a little more shifty than usual. He busted through for his first TD on an eight-yard run midway through the third quarter. On the second play of the fourth, Chubb bounced an off-tackle dive outside and down the left sideline. Three Kentucky defenders who seemed to have angles to run him down did not. It was a 55-yard touchdown and gave the Bulldogs a 35-13 lead. “He looked fast on that run,” chirped Michel, who likes to tease Chubb about being faster. Chubb sounded very Herschel-esque in describing the sensational play. “It was great blocking,” he said. “I don’t think I got touched. I kind of hit the sideline wide open, so it was great blocking up front.” Same old Chubb there. But we’d learn later it was a different kind of night. There he was, the muscle-bound captain who never mugs for cameras or does touchdown poses, grinning from ear-to-ear and laughing and glad-handing fans and hugging teammates. For a few minutes, he seemed almost like a regular college student. But as we all know, he’s anything but. “It was a great moment,” Chubb said of his uncharacteristic celebration. “I know that’s my last time leaving that field as a Georgia Bulldog. That’s something I can never have back, so I had to enjoy it.” We did, too, Nick. We did, too. The post That was no ordinary Nick Chubb we saw running over and around Kentucky appeared first on DawgNation.
  • ATHENS – Admit it, Georgia fans. Your Bulldogs had you a little nervous there for a minute, didn’t they? No worries. It was Kentucky that Georgia was playing. The seventh-ranked Bulldogs won 42-13 for their 57th all-time victory over the Wildcats. Only Georgia Tech (67) has lost more times to Georgia. Speaking of Georgia Tech, Georgia improves to 10-1 (7-1 SEC) just in time to face its rival next Saturday in the series that has come to be called “Clean, Old-Fashioned Hate.” The Yellow Jackets won in overtime last year in Athens. They fell to 5-5 with Saturday’s 43-20 loss at Duke. Saturday was a milestone game for Georgia’s Nick Chubb. With a 55-yard touchdown run early in the fourth quarter, Chubb had 151 yards rushing in the game, 1,045 for the season and 4,469 for his career. Chubb and Herschel Walker are now the only UGA backs to rush for more than 1,000 yards in three seasons. With the victory, Georgia’s seniors finish undefeated at Sanford Stadium for the first time since 2012, when it last went to the SEC Championship Game. The Bulldogs also finished with a perfect record against Eastern Division opponents for the first time in school history. Before all that, UGA found itself trailing in the first quarter for the second straight week and managed just 21 yards on its first two possessions against the Wildcats. But then Kentucky remembered it was Kentucky. The Wildcats roughed Georgia’s punter and the Bulldogs took the ball the rest of the way for a touchdown and a lead they’d never relinquished. Kentucky kept it interesting. It received the second-half kickoff and went 75 yards in eight plays that mostly featured tailback Benny Snell to make it 21-13 on Snell’s 1-yard run. But the Bulldogs answered quickly with a long, scoring drive of their own, and order was restored. Somewhere in between, Georgia offensive coordinator Jim Chaney realized it was not against the rules to pass on first down. After calling runs on nine consecutive first downs, Chaney flipped the switch in the second quarter and turned Jake Fromm loose. The result was three consecutive completions and back-to-back touchdown drives to open up a 21-6. Georgia controlled the game from then on. The post Nick Chubb, No. 7 Georgia Bulldogs run over Kentucky appeared first on DawgNation.
  • ATHENS – One million, eight hundred and sixty thousand. Dollars. At the very least, that is how much “The Big Four” left on the table to play for the Georgia Bulldogs this season. Probably would’ve been more. As far as I know, nobody has ever referred to Davin Bellamy, Lorenzo Carter, Nick Chubb and Sony Michel as The Big Four. But how can you not? That is essentially certainly what they’ve been for Georgia this season. I’m not talking about statistical contributions, necessarily. Yes, they’ve all contributed significantly to the Bulldogs’ cause in terms of what they bring to the team on the field each Saturday. But it’s really a more intangible effect that the Big Four has had on the 2017 squad. It started with them walking away from that pile of money last December. “Those four guys (coming back), it just shows their commitment,” said fellow senior Jeb Blazevich, a tight end. “I think that really set the tone for the rest of the team. It said, ‘hey, we’re investing another whole year into this.’… Even the younger guys are thinking, ‘this season is special.’” And it has been special. Still is, despite that aberration that occurred last Saturday at Auburn. With a win Saturday against the Kentucky Wildcats (7-3, 4-3 SEC), the No. 7-ranked Bulldogs can improve to 10-1 on the season and finish the year undefeated at home. They’ve already punched their ticket to Atlanta’s Mercedes-Benz Stadium and the SEC Championship Game. With that in hand, all other possibilities remain in play. That’s right, College Football Playoffs and national championship. Scoff if you like, but that remains these seniors’ objective. “We made a decision; we came back for a reason,” Carter said after the Bulldogs’ practice on Wednesday. “I think we’ve done a pretty good job so far. But all of us seniors – even the underclassmen – we let them know we’re not done yet.” We never got an exact assessment of what The Big Four were told by the NFL when they asked for a draft evaluation after last season. It’s a very formalized and private process nowadays. Essentially, underclassmen can inform the NFL’s college advisory committee that they’re considering foregoing their college eligibility to play professionally. Made up of high-level NFL personnel evaluators and individuals from scouting organizations, the advisory committee then reviews data and video provided by the players and their schools and offer a generalized assessment. They receiver either a “first- or second-round evaluation” or a “stay in school evaluation.” Not everybody accepts their assessment. In 2016, 107 underclassmen entered the draft. Of those, 30 of them went, according to the NFL. Without the benefit of these guys telling us the exact evaluation they received, there’s no way to know how much money The Big Four left on the table. But based on where I’m sitting, it’s at least the number I mentioned above. That’s based on my personal view that each one of these guys would have made an NFL roster, regardless of their draft position. The NFL minimum salary for 2017 is $465,000. Multiply that by four and you get $1.86 million. I don’t know what The Big Four’s presence has meant financially for UGA. I guess you could say without them, the Bulldogs probably aren’t eyeing a “New Year’s Six bowl” and certainly not an SEC Championship Game or playoff berth. All those come with their resident monetary rewards. Intangibly, though, it’s hard to put a number on. “That’s a group of guys that have been really special to me,” said Georgia coach Kirby Smart, who advised the Big Four to come back. “But they’ve been really special to the DawgNation and the legacy they leave behind.” Of course, it’s not just The Big Four who have made the Bulldogs into what they are this season. In fact, there are a bunch of seniors that have contributed to the cause this season. That goes beyond those who receive full-ride, grants-in-aid. Including walkons, there are 31 seniors who will honored during Senior Day before Saturday’s game. Not all of them have been here the last four years, but most of them have. Guys like safety Dominick Sanders, who needs one pick to tie the school record for career interceptions; like Aaron Davis, who has started 41 games, most ever by a non-kicking walkon; or tackle Isaiah Wynn, who has played in all but two games the last four years, most of them starts. Including a year at prep school, John-John Atkins has been pledged to Georgia since 2012, and has likewise been a block of granite for the Bulldogs at noseguard. Together, they’ve amassed a 37-12 record (.755). A couple more wins and they’ll finish among the Top 10 most successful teams of all time, which span 125 years. As for the money, Carter has maintained that it really wasn’t about that for him or the other seniors that came back. “We didn’t go out last year like we wanted to,” he has always maintained. “I feel like I had a lot more to do here so I couldn’t leave yet.” Nevertheless, Carter may have benefited the most in that regard. The 6-foot-6, 250-pound outside linebacker from Norcross has been mentioned as a potential NFL first-rounder for next April. Regardless, each of the Big Four has left an indelible mark on this program: Chubb became just the second rusher in Georgia history to exceed 4,000 career yards and will finish as UGA’s second all-time behind Herschel Walker in rushing yardage, rushing scores (39), and all-purpose yardage (4,669). His 4,318 rushing yards are the fourth most in SEC history. Michel is the fifth-leading rusher in Georgia history with 3,142 yards and could finish as high as third. He’s on pace to finish among the top five in all-purpose yards (3,755) yards as well. Bellamy has played in 33 games, collecting 108 tackles and 19.5 tackles for loss. He ranks third on the team with nine quarterback pressures this season. And Carter, he had a team-high nine tackles and a sack in the 42-7 win over Florida, a couple of huge sacks and fumble recoveries in the win at Notre Dame and 13.5 sacks in his career so far. Except for that stinging loss at Auburn last Saturday, senior year has been nothing but a blast for Carter and his classmates. But it’s not over yet, Carter points out. That’s why, if you’re going to Saturday’s game at Sanford Stadium, you really need to be inside and sitting in your seat by 3 p.m. Kickoff between No. 7 Georgia and Kentucky is not until 3:37 p.m., but setting aside an extra half-hour to honor these 2017 seniors rather than gulping down another cold one will be time well spent. “These guys have meant a lot to this program, meant a lot to me personally, meant a lot to the staff, and they’ve meant a lot to this university,” Smart said. “I think we all owe it to them, as a fan base and as a coaching staff and as a team, to make sure that we give them our best effort.” You can be assured that Georgia’s seniors will be bringing it. The post If ever there was a UGA senior class to see honored, this 2017 bunch is it appeared first on DawgNation.
  • We are on the eve of the final home football game of the Georgia Bulldog season: the seventh-ranked Dogs host the Kentucky Wildcats in tomorrow’s SEC finale. Kickoff for UGA Senior Day is set for 3:30 in Sanford Stadium, with national television on CBS.   The senior ceremony will begin at 3:16 p.m. ET at Sanford Stadium. Kickoff for the Bulldogs’ final home game of the season is set for 3:30 p.m., with the contest nationally televised on the CBS.  The 31 seniors to be recognized are John Atkins, DL, Thomson, Ga.; Davin Bellamy, LB, Stone Mountain, Ga.; Jeb Blazevich, TE, Charlotte, N.C.; Aulden Bynum, OL, Valdosta, Ga.; Lorenzo Carter, LB, Norcross, Ga.; Reggie Carter, LB, Stone Mountain, Ga.; Nick Chubb, RB, Cedartown, Ga.; John Courson, LS, Athens, Ga.; Aaron Davis, DB, Locust Grove, Ga.; Jordan Davis, TE, Thomson, Ga.; Alex Essex, DL, Richmond, Va.; Turner Fortin, RB, Johns Creek, Ga.; Trent Frix, LS, Calhoun, Ga.; Jacob Gross, RB, Thomaston, Ga.; Carson Hall, OL, Dallas, Ga.; Daniel Harper, LB, Atlanta, Ga.; Matthew Herzwurm, LS, Augusta, Ga.; Tim Hill, DB, Atlanta, Ga.; David Marvin, K, Charlotte, N.C.; Miles McGinty, TE, Savannah, Ga.; Sony Michel, RB, Hollywood, Fla.; Cameron Nizialek, P, Chantilly, Va.; Malkom Parrish, DB, Quitman, Ga.; Christian Payne, RB, Athens, Ga.; Brice Ramsey, QB, Kingsland, Ga.; Dominick Sanders, DB, Tucker, Ga.; Dyshon Sims, OL, Valdosta, Ga.;Thomas Swilley, OL, Athens, Ga.; Shakenneth Williams, WR, Macon, Ga.; Javon Wims, WR, Miami, Fla.; Isaiah Wynn, OL, St. Petersburg, Fla.
  • ATHENS — The best thing about what happened to Georgia last week on The Plains and what might happen Saturday against at Kentucky at Sanford Stadium is that the Bulldogs happen to play football with 18-to-22-year-olds. “Kids are more resilient than the adults and the fan base, I can promise you,” explained coach Kirby Smart, talking about the 23-point loss to Auburn on 680 The Fan’s Bulldog Roundtable on Thursday. “They live in a generation of ‘onto the next thing.’ They want 60 seconds; they’re two or three lines on Twitter; they go on SnapChat. That’s all they think about. So for them, it’s onto the next one.” There are some objectives for the Bulldogs beyond just winning the next game. Starting with that ill-fated trip to Auburn, this is the most challenging stretch of the season, and the SEC Championship game awaits, whether Georgia is ready for it or not. It will be paramount that the Bulldogs shore up some things, mentally as well as physically. “It’s important to gain some confidence in how they play, especially early in this game, so that they can get back to believing in themselves. At the end of the day, it’s the next opponent, a good opponent and an SEC opponent, so they’ve got to go out and perform and be ready for a four-quarter battle. I fully expect it to be that way with Kentucky.” Whether it could help or hinder that objective remains to be seen, but the Bulldogs will be honoring a huge group of seniors. They’re led the high-profile foursome of Davin Bellamy, Lorenzo Carter, Nick Chubb and Sony Michel, but there are numerous others who have distinguished themselves with their service in games or in practices. A whopping 31 players will be honored during Senior Day ceremonies, which will start promptly at 3 p.m. That group has logged a 37-12 record over the last four years. With a couple more wins, they have a chance to finish among the Top 10 most successful classes of all time in the 125-year history of Georgia football. “These seniors have been a tremendous asset for our staff,” Smart said. “They’re a lot of high-character kids who care a lot about the University of Georgia. We can give back to them and their families by honoring what they’ve done for the university. Here’s what has to happen to send them out the right way: Back to Bulldog Basics The Bulldogs have to find a way to get back to what had made it successful before Auburn humiliated them 40-17. Primarily, that is establish the run and stop the run. Georgia was overwhelmed in both of those respects against the Tigers, recording season lows in rushing on offense and defense. When Nick Chubb leads the Bulldogs with 27 yards rushing, you know it’s a bad day. There is nothing automatic about being able to do that against the Wildcats. They’re actually similar to Auburn statistically when it comes to stopping the run. They’re fourth in the SEC at 121.9 yards, or 3.5 yards more a game than the Tigers’ vaunted defense. So Georgia has to address its newly-exposed issues on the offensive line. The Bulldogs were experimenting in practice this week with big Ben Cleveland (6-6, 340) getting some looks at left guard. On the flipside, Kentucky already has called out Georgia to some degree. Sophomore Benny Snell promised the Bulldogs that he was going to be “bringing it” against them on Saturday. And he has more than a little something to bring. Snell (5-11, 233) is the SEC’s third-leading rusher (101.3 yards per game) and is coming off his third consecutive game in which he has scored three touchdowns. Snell had 114 yards and two touchdowns against Georgia last year when the Bulldogs eked out a 27-24 victory. Throw the ball downfield As much as the Bulldogs need to establish the run, they also have to prove they can throw the football. They’ve done that with some success this season, but not consistently and certainly not in the fashion that makes a defense respect it and change what they’re doing. Georgia’s freshman quarterback Jake Fromm not only has been extremely good at completing third-down throws and occasionally hitting defenses with big plays in the passing game. His yards per attempt continues to be one of the best in the country. But where the Bulldogs are lacking is in a consistent downfield attack that utilizes the middle of the field and give the safeties something else to think about. To date, most of Fromm’s attempts and completions have come on 50-50 plays against one-on-one coverage in the short to intermediate flat and up and down the sideline. That limits the risk of a turnover within the chaos that is the middle of field. If there’s a team Georgia might be able to exploit in this regard, it’s Kentucky. The Wildcats struggle in pass coverage. In fact, they’re last in the SEC against the pass, allowing 282.3 yards per game and giving up 18 touchdowns through the air.It may be time for Georgia offensive coordinator Jim Chaney to show more trust in the freshman Jake Fromm and let him try to exploit the middle of the defense. This, in turn, could get the Bulldogs’ impressive group of tight ends more involved in the passing game. Tighten up special teams It could be argued that Georgia has won the special teams matchup in every game it played this season. Well, up until last week’s game at Auburn. Actually, the Bulldogs remained dominant when came to the act of kicking and returning kicks. But they were flagged for two devastating personal-foul penalties on special teams plays, committed a turnover and missed a field goal. That undid all the good work displayed by return specialist Mecole Hardman, who had 183 yards in returns but muffed a punt that led to an early second-half touchdown by the Tigers. Kentucky is decidedly average on special teams, and is especially vulnerable on kickoff returns. This area of Saturday’s matchup is a clear advantage for the Bulldogs, and one of which they need to take full advantage. The post Planning for Opponent: Millennial mentality should serve Dawgs well vs. Kentucky appeared first on DawgNation.