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US News Headlines

    A federal judge in Seattle has refused to dismiss a lawsuit brought on behalf of tens of thousands of immigrants around the United States who may not have been told that they had a one-year deadline to apply for asylum. The case concerns immigrants who either were found to have a credible fear of persecution if returned to their home country or expressed such a fear. They were then released from immigration custody pending deportation proceedings, but according to their lawyers were not told about the deadline. The Department of Homeland Security argued that even if they missed the deadline, the asylum seekers could still ask an immigration judge for permission to apply. But U.S. District Judge Ricardo S. Martinez said Tuesday that's not good enough, because the law gives them a right to seek asylum within a year.
  • White House Press Secretary Sean Spicer told a reporter to 'stop shaking your head' during an exchange at his daily press briefing Tuesday. Spicer appeared annoyed by April Ryan, Washington bureau chief for American Urban Radio Networks, when she asked what President Trump's administration would do to revamp its image following reports of its ties to Russia. Spicer objected to the premise, saying: 'I appreciate your agenda here. At some point, report the facts.' He said there has been no proven collusion between Trump associates and Russian officials over interference in last year's election, quipping that 'if the president put Russian salad dressing on his salad tonight, somehow that's a Russian connection.' Spicer said Ryan appeared 'hell-bent' on projecting her own image of the White House when she asked what Trump might be doing to repair a relationship with former Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice, who did not support his campaign and was meeting with the president later this week. 'Please stop shaking your head again,' Spicer said to Ryan. He said the president was fulfilling a promise to build bridges with both supporters and opponents. Later, in an interview on MSNBC, Ryan said that 'Sean is being the White House press secretary, talking about and trying to make this administration look better than what it does right now, and unfortunately I was roadkill today.
  • Mexican mining and rail conglomerate Grupo Mexico said Tuesday that it has reached an agreement to buy Florida East Coast Railway Holdings Corp. for $2.1 billion. Grupo Mexico Transportes said it will acquire 100 percent of the company's shares and assume its debt, pending approval of the deal by regulatory authorities. The transaction will be financed by $350 million in Grupo Mexico funds and $1.75 billion in debt. Florida East Coast Railways operates a 351-mile freight system along Florida's Atlantic coast from Jacksonville to Miami. The railroad was founded in 1885 by Henry Flagler, a Standard Oil tycoon who developed resorts and communities on the state's coast. The Jacksonville-based company finished construction of an overseas railway to Key West in 1912, but the line was heavily damaged by a hurricane in 1935. Florida's government bought the rail line to Key West and converted it into a highway. The company was purchased in the 1930s by heirs of the du Pont family. In 2007, it was purchased by Fortress Investment Group.
  • A police report says a man accused of killing one man and wounding another on a double-decker Las Vegas Strip transit bus told detectives he felt threatened by a man who sat near him and was trying to scare him with gunfire. Rolando Cardenas told detectives following a standoff and his surrender Saturday that he was unemployed and homeless. He said he thought he heard the large man say he would attack him before he pulled a gun and fired twice. Police say video on the bus didn't show any provocation for the shooting, and the man Cardenas described wasn't injured. A Montana man was killed and a Las Vegas man was wounded. Police say Cardenas threw a police robot out of the bus during a four-hour standoff, and fired twice at a SWAT camera before tossing the gun out a window and surrendering.
  • A man whose attempted-murder conviction was tossed by a California judge walked free Tuesday after 20 years in prison. Marco Contreras, now 41, was embraced by his mother as his lawyers cheered following a Los Angeles court hearing during which he was declared factually innocent. 'I just had to be patient, and wait,' said Contreras, telling KCAL-TV he always knew he would be exonerated. Loyola Law School's Project for the Innocent, which fought for his release, pointed to a combination of factors that resulted in the conviction for a shooting and robbery at a Compton gas station in 1996. Contreras' vehicle, which he had lent to someone else, was in the vicinity. An eyewitness wrongly identified him as the shooter, despite the fact that he was at home sleeping at the time. A probe by the Sheriff's Department and the district attorney's office not only determined that Contreras was innocent, but led to the arrest of another suspect in the case. The law school project and prosecutors jointly petitioned Superior Court Judge William Ryan to release him. Contreras, who served two decades of a life-plus-seven-years sentence, said his spirituality helped him suppress anger during his time behind bars. He steadfastly maintained his innocence and fought to have his case re-investigated. Paula Mitchell, Loyola's legal director, said before the hearing that erroneous eyewitness identifications account for about 75 percent of all wrongful convictions in the U.S.
  • The question of collusion between Russian interests and Donald Trump's campaign is far from answered, despite repeated assertions by the president's spokesman that it's case closed. Sean Spicer angrily dismissed inquiries about the matter Tuesday, declaring that 'every single person who's been briefed on this, as I've said ad nauseam from this podium ... have been very clear that there is no connection between the president or the staff here and anyone doing anything with Russia.' That goes for 'Republican, Democrat, Obama appointee' and career civil servants, he added. They 'have all come to the same conclusion.' THE FACTS: The matter is being investigated by the FBI and two congressional committees, so no conclusions have been reached at all. According to a report published at the end of the Obama administration by the outgoing director of intelligence, James Clapper, no coordination between the Trump campaign and Russia had been established. But investigations are continuing into that very question. FBI Director James Comey said last week: 'I have been authorized by the Department of Justice to confirm that the FBI, as part of our counterintelligence mission, is investigating the Russian government's efforts to interfere in the 2016 presidential election and that includes investigating the nature of any links between individuals associated with the Trump campaign and the Russian government and whether there was any coordination between the campaign and Russia's efforts.' He said that 'as with any counterintelligence investigation, this will also include an assessment of whether any crimes were committed.' As for Clapper's report, his spokesman Shawn Turner said last week that the findings 'could not account for intelligence or evidence that may have been gathered since the inauguration on January 20th.' Spicer's claim that even Democrats who have been briefed on the matter agree there was no collusion is at odds with statements from Democrats. Rep. Adam Schiff of California, top Democrat on the House Intelligence Committee and a recipient of classified briefings, has said 'there is more than circumstantial evidence now' of a relationship between Russian interests and Trump associates. Michael Flynn was fired as national security adviser when his pre-inauguration contacts with Russia's ambassador to the U.S. emerged. As for 'staff here' being in the clear, as Spicer put it, they have neither been identified as targets of the investigations nor ruled out. A close adviser to Trump, son-in-law Jared Kushner, has agreed to talk to lawmakers about his business dealings with Russians. Other Trump associates have volunteered to be interviewed by the House and Senate intelligence committees as well. ___ AP White House Correspondent Julie Pace contributed to this report. ___ Find all AP Fact Checks at http://apne.ws/2kbx8bd EDITOR'S NOTE _ A look at the veracity of claims by political figures
  • Montenegro is set to become NATO's newest member after the Senate voted overwhelmingly to ratify the tiny Balkan nation's entry into the alliance. Senators on Tuesday approved a resolution of ratification, 97-2. Despite its small size, Montenegro bears strategic importance. A former ally of Russia, the country is in the midst of a clash between the West and Moscow over influence in the Balkans. Secretary of State Rex Tillerson pressed the Senate earlier this month to act quickly on Montenegro's admission. He told Senate leaders that the chamber's approval needed to come ahead of a summit scheduled for May that will include NATO heads of state and government. Tillerson said the U.S. was one of the last remaining NATO members not to have given Montenegro's bid full parliamentary approval.
  • A cyanide device for killing coyotes that spewed the poison on a boy and killed his dog was set up on public land in Idaho in February despite a decision months earlier by federal officials to halt use of the devices on all U.S.-owned land in the state, officials said Tuesday. The device activated March 16 when 14-year-old Canyon Mansfield and his dog checked it out 300 yards (275 meters) from their home on the outskirts of the small city of Pocatello. The boy has suffered headaches since he was exposed. The U.S. Bureau of Land Management spokeswoman Erin Curtis told The Associated Press in a telephone interview that the device that went off and another one were put there by the U.S. Agriculture Department in late February. An Agriculture Department document said the agency would stop using the devices last November on all federally owned Idaho land to reduce health risks to people and domestic animals. The department did not immediately comment Tuesday on why the device was placed on the land in an apparent violation of its policy, but said in an emailed statement to the AP that 'the unintentional lethal take of a dog is a rare occurrence.' It also said its wildlife services division is reviewing its 'operating procedures to determine whether improvements can be made to reduce the likelihood of similar occurrences happening in the future.' Mark Mansfield, the boy's father and a physician, said an emergency room doctor and a toxicologist who examined his son told him they were surprised that the boy did not die after he was sprayed with the cyanide powder emitted by the device. 'I'm panicking for my son,' he said in an interview. 'We're worried, and we just don't know. It's a miracle he lived in the first place.' The family is consulting with medical specialists about the boy's continuing headaches, his father said. The devices called M-44s look like water sprinkler heads and were put on the land as part of a federal effort to kill coyotes that target livestock. But Mansfield said the area where his son came across one is a hill that overlooks houses with barking dogs and children playing. M-44s are spring-activated devices typically smeared with bait that shoot cyanide into an animal's mouth when it tugs on the device. 'We're shocked that a human being, whether you work for the government or a private company, would put this near someone's home,' Mansfield said. The federal government uses the devices to control predator populations to limit losses for ranchers and other livestock owners. They killed about 12,500 coyotes, mostly in Western U.S. states, in 2016, the wildlife services division said on its website. The device that went off was put there by a worker with the wildlife services division who has not been identified and the Agriculture Department has not said why the worker did so. The area has a mix of public and private land, so it's not clear whether the worker accidentally ended up on public land. The ban on using the devices on public land does not apply to private land, and some private landowners want the devices put on their land to kill coyotes and other predators. Local officials are conducting a criminal investigation and plan to turn over findings to prosecutors in Bannock County who would decide whether to pursue charges. 'The problem we have is that we have houses in every direction from where the device was placed,' said Sheriff's Det. Lt. Andy Thomas. 'We know the boy got it on his eyes, arms and legs. We have no clue why he's not dead.' Thomas said he and other deputies initially thought the device was a pipe bomb, but found no external injuries on the dog, a Labrador retriever named Casey. After learning several hours later what the device actually was, Thomas was examined at a hospital with the Mansfield family members for cyanide exposure. All of their clothes were burned after they were examined to avoid spreading the toxin. Thomas interviewed the worker who set up the device but declined to provide details because the investigation is ongoing. The event is an example of how some Agriculture Department efforts to protect livestock are outdated at a time when hikers, bikers and others increasingly explore public lands, said John Freemuth, a Boise State University environmental policy professor and public lands expert. 'They're a symbol of the old West confronting the more diverse West,' he said.
  • Days after a child was kidnapped from Elite Academy Inc., the Memphis, Tennessee, day care has closed its doors for good. >> Read more trending news A Department of Human Services spokesperson said an investigation into the day care is ongoing, but the owner voluntarily shut down the business. The closure is permanent. Related: Mother speaks out after 7-month-old is kidnapped from day care On Thursday, 7-month-old A’Laleh Fentress was checked out from her day care by 18-year-old Mya Lakes. Lakes is charged with especially aggravated kidnapping and child abuse/neglect. Her bail is $100,000. A’Laleh’s mother said Lakes saw her name on a document at the day care and used it to check out the child. The 7-month-old’s mother called police from the day care when she came to pick her baby up that evening. A’Laleh was later found safe at Annie’s Place in Frayser. Related: Memphis day care at center of kidnapping had no previous violations Elite Academy Inc. has been inspected by the DHS at least eight times since it opened in August 2016. According to the government database, the day care was never cited for violations.
  • Authorities arrested a school bus driver Tuesday after he allegedly drove a bus while high on marijuana. >> Read more trending news Officers were called Tuesday morning to Chelmsford High School in Chelmsford, Massachusetts, after students reported smelling a strange odor on the school bus they had boarded for a field trip. The students notified a teacher, who contacted the Chelmsford Police Department. The students were taken off the bus. Officers determined that the bus driver, 63-year-old Ali Mahfuz, was high on marijuana. Mahfuz was charged with operating under the influence of drugs, operating negligently as to endanger and reckless endangerment. Before arriving at Chelmsford High School, Mahfuz drove a route for Greater Lowell Technical High School in Tyngsborough. Mahfuz is employed by North Reading Transportation Inc. The company is cooperating with the investigation. Chelmsford police Chief James Spinney praised the students for speaking up. 'I cannot overstate the role played by the students today in ensuring their safety on the roads,' Spinney said. 'They knew something was not right, and they spoke up right away, alerting school administrators. I commend these students for their role in stopping a dangerous situation from unfolding.' Mahfuz is scheduled for arraignment Tuesday in Lowell District Court.

Local News

  • Rabun County authorities are seeking a missing 28-year-old woman who has her three sons with her, officials said. According to a post on the sheriff’s Facebook page, Brittany Rebecca Stewart has been missing since Thursday. Her children are 7 months to 7 years old. She’s believed to be driving a maroon 1999 Ford Explorer with Georgia tag RCP0743, the sheriff’s office said in the post. Anyone with information about the whereabouts of Stewart and her children is asked to call 911 or Rabun dispatch at 706-782-6226.
  • A dinner meeting is set for tonight for Clarke County School Board members and the first of three finalists to be the next Clarke County School Superintendent: the Board is looking for a replacement for the departed Dr. Phil Lanoue. The United Way of Northeast Georgia holds its annual meeting and awards banquet, 5:30 this afternoon at the downtown Holiday Inn.  Another meeting of the Envision Athens steering committee is on tap for today, underway at 4 o’clock at the Classic Center.  There is an afternoon meeting of the Classic Center Authority: 4 o’clock at the Classic Center in downtown Athens. There is a jobs fair today in Athens: the Benson Hospitality Group is setting up shop at the downtown Holiday Inn at 5 o’clock this afternoon.  Tonight’s Oconee County Commission meeting gets underway at 7 o’clock at the Oconee County Courthouse in Watkinsville. It’s an agenda setting session.  Barrow County Commissioners meet tonight, 7 o’clock at the Historic Courthouse in Winder. 
  • Police in Winder have released the name of the man whose body was found in a car in a shopping center parking lot. Todd Davis was 52 years old, from Winder. His body was discovered Sunday in a vehicle parked in the Holly Hill shopping center on West Athens Street in Winder. Police say there are no immediate indications of foul play; also still no word on the exact cause of death. Hall County authorities have released the name of the husband and wife killed in what is believed to have been a murder-suicide: the bodies of 75 year-old Larry McGinness and 69 year-old Shelly McGinness were found last week at a home in Gainesville. The GBI is in on the ongoing investigation. 
  • State Rep. Tommy Benton believes the history of the Confederate army is part of Southern cultural heritage and should be recognized formally in the state. Benton, a Republican from Jefferson, sponsored House Resolution 644 along with state Reps. Alan Powell, Steve Tarvin and Jesse Petrea to commemorate the “brave” men who fought on the Confederate side in the Civil War by recognizing April as Confederate History Month and April 26 as Confederate Memorial Day. His resolution, however, makes no mention of the “Civil War,” instead referring to it as the “four-year struggle for states’ rights, individual freedom, and local governmental control, which they believed to be right and just.” But when asked whether the resolution, which is written to “encourage our citizens to learn about Georgia’s heritage and history and to observe the occasion with appropriate ceremonies,” includes the need to understand the role that slavery and systemic exploitation and oppression of African and African-American people played and an acknowledgement of what the war was fought about, Benton declined to answer. “Next question,” Benton said Monday during a press conference about the resolution. A former schoolteacher and unapologetic supporter of preserving Georgia’s Confederate heritage, Benton has previously backed a measure that would protect state monuments from being moved or removed. He has also said the Ku Klux Klan, though he didn’t agree with all its methods, “made a lot of people straighten up.” Benton said the intentions of his proposal, which isn’t expected to gain any traction in the final days of the legislative session, have been misunderstood and misinterpreted. “It should never have been a controversy,” Benton said. “We’re not honoring slavery.” After a gunman and avowed white supremacist shot and killed nine people praying in an African Methodist Episcopal church in Charleston, S.C., many Southern states came under fire for their embrace of Confederate memorabilia and traditions. The fourth Monday in April had for decades been known in Georgia as Confederate Memorial Day. But in 2015, Gov. Nathan Deal quietly struck that reference, as well as Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee’s birthday, from the official state calendar and renamed each date as a “State Holiday.”
  • The Georgia DOT is holding an afternoon meeting on plans to widen Highway 441 in Oconee and Morgan counties. The first session with the Oconee County Citizens Advisory Committee is set for 5 o’clock in the Community Center at the Oconee County Veterans Park. It is expected that plans for a Bishop bypass will be up for discussion at today’s meeting.  Your drive through Madison could be disrupted again this week: more movie work is taking place in Morgan County, with production of a film that stars Reba McIntire. Southbound lane closures on I-85 in Franklin County are scheduled for tonight, as the DOT continues work on the Interstate weigh station near Lavonia. 

Bulldog News

  • ATHENS – For years, Georgia’s head football and basketball coaches used to go on an extensive spring speaking tour, answering questions and shaking hands with fans who paid a small fee at the door. Those days of extensive touring around Georgia appear to be over. At least for now. The university has planned five events this spring featuring Kirby Smart, but they will be private donor events – and for now only one will be in the state of Georgia. The school will host events in Nashville, Charlotte, Jacksonville and Houston, with the lone in-state event being in Atlanta in July. These events will be closed to the public and the media, open only to donors. But there will also be two additional in-state events featuring Smart, athletics director Greg McGarity said Monday afternoon. Those events will just be branded differently. “We’re still working through two in-state events that would be branded under the Georgia Bulldog Club, or under UGA athletics,” McGarity said. In the past, Georgia football and basketball coach did as many as 12 spring tour stops, almost all in the state, from Columbus to Macon to Augusta and even smaller stops. But those tours have gradually dissipated: In Mark Richt’s final year, he only went to seven stops. Last year Smart went to five stops, though four of the were in-state, the exception being a donor event in Dallas. This year it’s going all-private, which someone with knowledge said evolved from Smart coming in with a new approach, and UGA wanting to do fundraising. There’s a feeling they don’t need the old model, where fans get a chance to hear from coaches and ask them questions, because of social media and other factors. Crowds at these events had also been going down. “The university is trying to be strategic to generate the money that everybody needs to generate right now,” McGarity said. “The purpose of these events have changed, they’ve morphed over the years.” The athletics department did seem to anticipate some fan blowback. “As for our donors, I realize there may be some sensitivity to the majority of the events being out of state this year,” associate athletics director for development Matt Borman wrote in an internal e-mail earlier this month. “If donors bring this up to you please just say that we are excited to be in Atlanta with an event in July and we wanted to take an opportunity this year to visit some of our supporters who don’t have the opportunity to make it to Athens on a regular basis. “After this year of events we will reevaluate and definitely consider bringing some of these events back into Georgia.” There are other speaking events for Smart that aren’t directly affiliated with the school. For instance, he is speaking Monday night at the Athens Touchdown Club, and spoke last month at the Macon Touchdown Club.
  • ATHENS, Ga. --- The University of Georgia women’s tennis team extended its win streak to six matches with a commanding 4-0 victory over Mississippi State Sunday afternoon at the Dan Magill Tennis Complex.   The Bulldogs (13-3, 7-1 SEC) continued to roll in doubles as they grabbed the point for the seventh-consecutive match. The 28th-ranked duo of Elena Christofi and Kennedy Shaffer clinched it on court two for the sixth time in the streak. In singles, Mariana Gould blew by her opponent 6-0, 6-1 followed by a Shaffer win at No. 3 and a clincher at the net by Christofi on court two.   “We are in the middle of this conference race and it's been tough every time we play all these schools,” Georgia head coach Jeff Wallace said. “I keep saying in the SEC we have 11 in the top 25 rankings and everybody comes ready to play. Mississippi State was another one of those teams. I thought the doubles point was great. Getting that 1-0 lead is critical for us. It was a good match and a great day and now we hit the road for the next three before we conclude our season here at home.” The shutout was Georgia’s fifth of the season. The Bulldogs have now rallied off six straight conference wins with four of those against teams in the top-25.   In doubles, the No. 2 court sat at 4-3 before Christofi/Shaffer finished the last two games strong to win 6-3 over Khrystyna Vozniak and Jennifer Brown. The Georgia twosome showcases a 6-1 record playing No. 2 and an 11-2 slate on the year.   Mississippi State (11-5, 4-4) started doubles with the lead after 11th-ranked tandem of Jasmine Lee and Lisa Marie Rioux edged No. 18 Ellen Perez and Caroline Brinson on court one. However, Gould and Marta Gonzalez evened up the score on court three winning 6-3 before Christofi and Shaffer secured the point.   In singles, junior Mariana Gould, ranked at No. 102, overpowered her opponent 6-0, 6-1 on the last court to put Georgia up 2-0. Gould, of Boise, Idaho, ups her win streak to five on court six where she has a 10-2 dual record.   The remaining singles matches featured two first-set tiebreakers and four that spilled into the third set. On court No. 3, Kennedy Shaffer edged Madison Harrison in the first-set tiebreaker 7-2, then carried that momentum into the second set winning 6-2.   In the battle of freshmen on court two eighth-ranked Christofi defeated Rioux in the deciding third set 6-1 to seal the win for the Bulldogs. The clincher was Christofi’s fourth on the season en route to a team-best 26-4 record.   Georgia was leading in two of the three remaining third-set matches that went unfinished. At No. 4, Brinson was on the verge of victory leading Anastasia Rentouli 5-0. After Perez dropped the first-set tiebreaker, she took the second set over 32nd-ranked Jasmine Lee and was up 2-1 when play was called.   “This year is going fast we got to keep working and stay excited and continue to compete like we're competing,” Wallace added.   The Bulldogs are back in action Saturday, April 1st at No. 23 Tennessee. First serve is slotted for 1 p.m. ET.    ## Tennis Match Results Mississippi State vs. Georgia Mar 26, 2017 at Athens, Ga. (Dan Magill Tennis Complex)   #3 Georgia 4, #25 Mississippi State 0   Singles competition  1. #26 Ellen Perez (UGA) vs. #32 Jasmine Lee (MSU) 6-7 (5-7), 6-3, 2-1, unfinished 2. #8 Elena Christofi (UGA) def. Lisa Marie Rioux (MSU) 6-1, 2-6, 6-1 3. #57 Kennedy Shaffer (UGA) def. Madison Harrison (MSU) 7-6 (7-2), 6-2 4. #59 Caroline Brinson (UGA) vs. Anastasia Rentouli (MSU) 6-4, 1-6, 5-0, unfinished 5. Marta Gonzalez (UGA) vs. Khrystyna Vozniak (MSU) 4-6, 6-3, 0-1, unfinished 6. #102 Mariana Gould (UGA) def. Sara Lizariturry (MSU) 6-0, 6-1   Doubles competition  1. #11 Jasmine Lee/Lisa Marie Rioux (MSU) def. #18 Ellen Perez/Caroline Brinson (UGA) 6-2 2. #28 Elena Christofi/Kennedy Shaffer (UGA) def. Khrystyna Vozniak/Jennifer Brown (MSU) 6-3 3. #68 Marta Gonzalez/Mariana Gould (UGA) def. Sara Lizariturry/Madison Harrison (MSU) 6-3   Match Notes: Mississippi State 11-5, 4-4; National ranking #25 Georgia 13-3, 7-1; National ranking #3 Order of finish: Doubles (1,3,2); Singles (6,3,2) UGA Rankings: ITA #3, USTA #T6 Official: Karen Badger-Mabry T-2:15 A-460 
  • FROM UGA SPORTS COMMUNICATIONS  Athens, Ga. — For the second straight year, Georgia’s J.J. Frazier has been named the state of Georgia’s Men’s College Basketball Player of the Year by the Atlanta Tipoff Club. The club announced its annual award winners on Thursday. Frazier, 5-10, 155-pound senior from Glennville, Ga., led the Bulldogs and ranked among the SEC’s top-10 performers in scoring (third at 18.8 ppg), assists (fifth at 4.1 apg), steals (third at 1.9 spg) and playing time (first at 34.6 mpg). He finished the 2016-17 season with 640 points, the fourth-best mark in school history. Frazier set the Georgia career record for free throw percentage (.841). He had a school-record streak of 45 consecutive made free throws during his senior season, which is also the second-longest streak in SEC history. Frazier has collected a long list of accolades this season. He was named SEC and National Player of the Week on Week on Feb. 27 after averaging 28.5 points in wins over Alabama and LSU in a 49-hour span. Frazier was also voted first-team All-SEC by both league coaches and the Associated Press. He was named to All-District teams by the U.S. Basketball Writers Association (USBWA) and the National Association of Basketball Coaches (NABC). UGA players have won Tipoff Club’s statewide honor 10 times since its inception in 1984. Frazier is just the second Bulldog to earn Georgia Player of the Year honors twice. Jarvis Hayes was honored following both the 2002 and 2003 seasons.  Vern Fleming was the award’s initial recipient in 1984, followed by Litterial Green in 1992, Jumaine Jones in 1999, Hayes in 2002 and 2003, Rashad Wright in 2004, Trey Thompkins in 2011, Kentavious Caldwell-Pope in 2013 and Frazier in 2016 and 2017. 
  • There will be a new policy in place for football fans who go to games at Sanford Stadium later this year. The University of Georgia says it will be following Southeastern Conference guidelines and requiring fans to bring items into the Stadium and other athletic venues in clear plastic bags. UGA says the policy will be in place for the April 22 G-Day spring football game.  From the University of Georgia…   In the interest of public safety and to expedite entry into its venues, the UGA Athletic Association will begin to implement the Southeastern Conference Clear Bag Policy in 2017. This policy will be in effect at the annual G-Day intrasquad football game on April 22. It will go into effect permanently for the 2017-18 competition season and will include all UGA venues that host ticketed events: Sanford Stadium (football), Stegeman Coliseum (men’s & women’s basketball, gymnastics) and Foley Field (baseball). Following are the basics concerning the Clear Bag Policy: > These bags will be permitted inside UGA athletic events: Bags that are clear plastic, vinyl, or PVC and do not exceed 12”x6”x12”. One-gallon clear plastic freezer bags. Small clutch bags, with or without a handle or strap, that do not exceed 4.5” x 6.5”. Bags that contain necessary medical items, which must be inspected and approved at a designated gate. > Each ticket holder is allowed one large clear bag such as a one-gallon Ziploc style bag or clear plastic, vinyl or PVC bag that does not exceed 12” x 6” x 12”, plus a small clutch purse > Prohibited bags include, but are not limited to: purses larger than a clutch bag, briefcases, backpacks, cinch bags, fanny packs that are not clear and/or exceed the size restriction, luggage, computer bags/cases, camera bags/cases, binocular bags/cases, or any bag larger than the permissible size. > Several SEC schools began implementing this policy in the 2016 school year. All SEC schools will have this policy in place by the 2017-18 school year. > Fans can still carry items such as binoculars, smart phones, tablets and cameras (with lenses shorter than four inches), so long as they are not in a bag or carrying case. > Seat cushions -- without arms or pockets -- will still be permitted into the venues. Fans may also bring in blankets during cold weather events, provided they carry them in over an arm or shoulder to allow for easy screening upon entry. > More information on this new policy can be found at the following website: http://georgiadogs.com/clear-bag-policy/
  • The Clear Bag Policy will be in effect in Sanford Stadium, Stegeman Coliseum and Foley Field.