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Local News

  • Many of the faces of the white-power demonstrators in Charlottesville were those of young people. But how do young Americans become young American Nazis? Are far-right parents indoctrinating their kids to believe in and fight for white supremacy? In some cases, perhaps. More likely, experts say, is that some teenagers embrace hate groups because they feel as if they have few other options. Hate groups provide a sense of belonging, a sense that members are part of something. Shannon Martinez of Athens is now 43 and the mother of seven children. But when she was a teenager, Martinez says, she never felt as if she fit in.    “I hated everybody,” Martinez said. “To be a part of a hate group, all I had to say was ‘I hate black people, I hate Jews and I hate non-whites.’ That was the price of admission. I was a white-power skinhead.” Experts who study hate groups say that many young people turn to neo-Nazi or Klan factions because they have few other options. Finding young adulthood a big, empty place, they are readily radicalized by hate groups that offer a sense of identity and belonging. Many white supremacists share an ironic bond with American Islamists: They are not indoctrinated by radical far-right parents so much as they are seduced by the Internet. “Members do seem to be getting younger and while there are a number of reasons people join, it often seems to be filling a void in their lives,” said Paul Becker, a sociology professor at the University of Dayton who has written extensively about hate crimes, white supremacy and anti-government movements. “So these groups provide a place to belong, friends, and give their lives a goal or purpose. Therefore, something like coming from a broken home or experiencing abuse could be a factor in someone joining these types of groups.” The skinhead years were a long time ago. But with the images coming out of Charlottesville last weekend, the threat of more racially inspired protests and violence on the horizon, and the tepid response from the White House, those years don’t seem quite so distant. With the face of racist extremism seemingly getting younger, Martinez is one of the lucky ones. She got out and now she is trying to pull others out by working with an organization dedicated to helping people repudiate white supremacy. “There is no new racism. There is no new dark place or uptick in racism,” Martinez said. “But there is a pendulum dynamic. When one end of the political spectrum is given more voice and credence, there is always a backlash. It has become easier for those people to come out in the open because of the climate created since Trump became a viable candidate.”
  • As a result of President Jere W. Morehead's meetings with community leaders in April, the University of Georgia will be offering workforce development and work-based learning initiatives to local youth beginning this fall. Morehead's conversation centered on economic development and education, and how the university can play a role in both areas. 'One of the priorities of the University of Georgia is to support the Athens community,' Morehead said. 'The goals of these programs are to promote the importance of graduation and prepare students for the workforce. Students will gain practical experience that they will carry for years to come, as well as gain exposure to the University of Georgia and all we have to offer.' UGA has joined the Great Promise Partnership, a program implemented in the Clarke County School District and coordinated through the Georgia Department of Community Affairs that connects organizations with local at-risk youth through part-time jobs. 'After hearing the community feedback, this partnership seemed to be a natural connection for the university,' said Alison McCullick, director of community relations for the UGA Office of Government Relations. 'GPP has been a successful workforce development program across the state of Georgia for five years, and as the largest employer in Clarke County, the university was interested in becoming engaged.' Through GPP, part-time jobs will be offered to students at risk of dropping out of high school to provide practical workforce experience, as well as extra support and mentoring opportunities to keep students on track for graduation. Part-time job placement will begin in spring 2018. In addition to GPP, UGA will offer internships across the university to encourage work-based learning development. Internships will be based in a student's field of interest, and will directly relate to academic goals set by the students. Internships will be available in multiple areas such as the College of Education, the Office of Research and the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, with more opportunities being added throughout the year. The UGA Small Business Development Center, a public service and outreach unit, will also be involved, hosting a seminar this fall for the participants covering job skills, job traits that employers value once a job offer is received, and opportunities to continue to grow and develop once the job has begun. Johnelle Simpson, Great Promise Partnership and work-based learning coordinator with the Clarke County School District, is eager to work alongside the university. 'I'm excited that the University of Georgia will be partnering with the Great Promise Partnership Program and the Clarke County School District to provide work-based learning opportunities to students,' he said. 'This collaboration is a win-win situation for everyone-schools, businesses, students and the community.
  • Injuries to a woman shot Monday in Jackson County are not believed to be life-threatening: shooting suspect Philip Bailey was arrested by Jefferson Police after the shooting on Marion Drive in Jefferson. A Jackson County man facing child molestation charges has a court appearance in Hall County: Eleazar Mata is 41 years old, from Pendergrass. He’s accused of having a sex with a girl who was 13 years old when their relationship began. There was a Monday pretrial hearing in a Magistrate Court in Gainesville.   
  • The University of North Georgia is the scene of legislative tax talk today: the second meeting of the Senate Special Tax Exemption Study Committee is set for 11 o’clock this morning at the UNG campus in Dahlonega. The panel is charged by Roswell Republican John Albers (pictured).   A state lawmaker from Gwinnett County plans a public meeting for later this month: Highway 316 will be the topic of the August 28 session organized by state Representative P.K. Martin. The Lawrenceville Republican will talk about traffic congestion on 316 through Dacula, Duluth, and Lawrenceville. 
  • The Georgia Bulldogs are the 15th ranked team in the preseason AP college football poll: Alabama is number one, followed by Ohio State, Florida State, Southern Cal, and Clemson. The Dogs open the season in 11 days at home against Appalachian State.  Kickoff on September 2 is set for 6:30. Alabama (52) Ohio State (3) Florida State (4) USC (2) Clemson  Penn State  Oklahoma Washington  Wisconsin  Oklahoma State  Michigan  Auburn  LSU  Stanford  Georgia  Louisville  Florida  Miami  South Florida Kansas State  Virginia Tech  West Virginia  Texas  Washington State Tennessee  Others receiving votes: TCU (98), Utah (85), Notre Dame (65), Boise State (37), NC State (26), Northwestern (25), Pittsburgh (23), Oregon (21), Houston (19), Colorado (18), UCLA (9), San Diego State (9), BYU (5), Appalachian State (4), Nebraska (4), Tulsa (4), Kentucky (3), Texas A&M (3), Michigan State (1).

Bulldog News

  • The Georgia Bulldogs are the 15th ranked team in the preseason AP college football poll: Alabama is number one, followed by Ohio State, Florida State, Southern Cal, and Clemson. The Dogs open the season in 11 days at home against Appalachian State.  Kickoff on September 2 is set for 6:30. Alabama (52) Ohio State (3) Florida State (4) USC (2) Clemson  Penn State  Oklahoma Washington  Wisconsin  Oklahoma State  Michigan  Auburn  LSU  Stanford  Georgia  Louisville  Florida  Miami  South Florida Kansas State  Virginia Tech  West Virginia  Texas  Washington State Tennessee  Others receiving votes: TCU (98), Utah (85), Notre Dame (65), Boise State (37), NC State (26), Northwestern (25), Pittsburgh (23), Oregon (21), Houston (19), Colorado (18), UCLA (9), San Diego State (9), BYU (5), Appalachian State (4), Nebraska (4), Tulsa (4), Kentucky (3), Texas A&M (3), Michigan State (1).
  • ATHENS, Ga. --- Georgia soccer defeated High Point, 1-0, on Sunday afternoon for the Bulldogs’ first win of the 2017 season.   In the 71st minute, Maddie Burdick passed to Caroline Chipman, who played the ball into the box, allowing Katie MacGinnitie to kick it into the back of the net, putting the Bulldogs up 1-0.   “We’re happy to come away with the win,” Georgia head coach Billy Lesesne said. “I think our effort was there, just as it was Friday night against Wake Forest, but today we ended up grinding it out and getting a hard-worked goal. It was not a thing of beauty but the players kept it alive until Katie was able to put it away. It was a really nice finish and a determined effort at the end of the field.”   Georgia (1-1) controlled the ball offensively throughout the first half of the game, taking nine shots to High Point’s (1-1) one, but the score remained 0-0 after the first 45 minutes of play.    The Bulldogs came out determined in the second half, continuing to control possession.    High Point’s best chance for the equalizer came seven minutes after Georgia took the 1-0 lead with a penalty kick that hit the left goal post and went wide.   Georgia hits the road for the first time this season when the team travels to take on Charlotte on Friday, August 25 at 7 p.m. before continuing onto Blacksburg, Virginia to play the Virginia Tech Hokies on Sunday, August 27 at 2 p.m.   Fans now have the opportunity to enjoy Georgia soccer games with a UGA soccer seatback. The seatbacks are thick and comfortable, and can be purchased at the Fan Info table located in the plaza of the Turner Soccer Complex for $5 per game. You can also save $15 by purchasing a soccer seatback for all nine home matches of the season for a total of $30.
  • ATHENS, Ga.--- Three members of the Georgia soccer team have been named to the Southeastern Conference Soccer Preseason Watch List announced Wednesday by the conference office. Since 2011, the SEC has named a watch list in lieu of selecting preseason all-conference teams.     Seniors Louise Hogrell and Mariel Gutierrez, as well as freshman Katie Higgins joined players from each of the other 13 member institutions on the list. Hogrell receives the honor for the third consecutive season, while this marks the second consecutive season Gutierrez was named to the list.    Hogrell returns in goal for Georgia after playing all but 15 minutes during the 2016 season. She led the SEC in saves (94) and ranked second in saves per game (5.22). The Asa, Sweden native ranks near the top in several UGA career records following her junior season, including fifth in career shutouts (14), fifth in saves (262), and fifth in wins (21).    Gutierrez is back for her senior season as Georgia’s leading returner in assists with four in 2016. The Mexico City, Mexico native started all 18 games at midfield for the Bulldogs last season and scored four goals.     Higgins kicks off her collegiate career after leading PDA O’Reilly to an ECNL U-18 Northeast Conference championship and a quarterfinals finish in the national playoffs. The Andreas, Pennsylvania native was an early enrollee who contributed in the spring in preparation for the 2017 season. She started in the exhibition game against Auburn and took one shot.   Georgia will officially kick off the 2017 season at the Turner Soccer Complex against Wake Forest on Friday, Aug. 18 at 7 p.m. The Bulldogs cap off opening weekend in Athens against High Point on Sunday, Aug. 20 at 2 p.m. Admission is free.
  • 960 The Ref’s Sam Franco got the chance to tour the new Mercedes Benz Stadium, home of the Atlanta Falcons and the Atlanta United