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National Govt & Politics
Election overtime - it's controversial, but much of it is normal
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Election overtime - it's controversial, but much of it is normal

Election overtime - it's controversial, but much of it is normal
Photo Credit: Jamie Dupree

Election overtime - it's controversial, but much of it is normal

For those who watch elections in the states, and in Congress, every two years there is a familiar scenario as the votes are counted for days, and sometimes weeks after Election Day, as close races for the U.S. House and Senate can sometimes stretch until Thanksgiving as county elections boards go through provisional ballots, overseas military ballots, and absentees.

It's normal.

But to a lot of average citizens who only tune in every two or four years, it seems hard to believe that three days after Election Day - let alone a week or two weeks - that elections officials would still be counting votes in close races around the country.

It's normal.

But with two key U.S. Senate races still undecided on Friday - and both suddenly in question for the GOP - President Donald Trump led a chorus of Republican voices in charging that Democrats were up to post-election dirty tricks, in order to take two Senate wins away from the GOP.

Asked by reporters if he had actual evidence of vote fraud, the President did not offer any as he left for a weekend in France.

But in many ways, this is normal.

Six years ago at this time in Arizona, the votes were coming in slowly, just as they have this year - except Sen. Jeff Flake (R-AZ) was ahead by a comfortable margin, and it didn't draw much attention in the press, because other states were in the news.

What other state was making news days after the election in 2012? That would be Florida, which was still counting votes in a very tight race for President.

"Amid much criticism and ridicule," the Associated Press article began on November 9, 2012 - the same Friday in 2018 that President Trump and other Republicans were expressing their anger about vote counting in two south Florida counties, as Democrats brought down the margin in a key Senate race under 15,000 votes.

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This year's troubles in Florida certainly are drawing more than just ridicule - and may well go further into dysfunction - but the timing of the continued vote count in the Sunshine State in big counties is not new.

Meanwhile in Georgia, the new Secretary of State - sworn in after the former Secretary, Brian Kemp, resigned after declaring himself the winner of the Governor's race - said that while all the votes were being tabulated, no updated vote counts would be posted until next week.

Across the country, different states have different rules on how to treat everything from absentee ballots to mail-in ballots - for example, in Florida, a mail-in ballot must arrive by Election Day.

But in Arizona and California, those ballots must be postmarked by Election Day, and then have to arrive at the elections offices by Friday evening.

In other words, ballots were still pouring in on Wednesday and Thursday.

Out in California, the Los Angeles Times reported that 5 million ballots were still to be counted on Friday.

You read that right.

And it's normal.

But for many of my listeners and readers, what is going on in these states is an absolute outrage - though the outrage seems to fall in line with whether the newly arrived vote totals are helping their party's candidate or not.

There are more deadlines next week. And the week after. And after that.

It takes time.

And it's normal.

Read More

Local News

  • There is a chance of rain and thunderstorms for Athens and northeast Georgia. The threat of severe weather, apparently diminishing overnight, nonetheless leads several school districts in south Georgia—Albany among them—to cancel classes for the day.  From Channel 2 Action News… There are several metro Atlanta counties under a Tornado Watch early Friday morning as a line of storms and rain move into the area. Severe Weather Team 2 has been tracking the system all week as it moved through the country. The Tornado Watch has been issued for Troup, Meriwether, Pike and Upson counties.
  • The University of Georgia gymnastics team begins competition in the NCAA Finals: the Gym Dogs are taking part in the tournament set for this weekend in Fort Worth Texas.  “We’re peaking at the right time,” says Georgia coach Courtney Kupets Carter. Oklahoma is ranked first going into the tournament. UGA is eighth.
  • A Newton County fine arts teacher faces two felonies for allegedly sexually assaulting students last month, authorities said. Christopher Ehren Matyas, born in 1980, of Covington, was arrested Thursday and charged with two counts of sexual assault by persons with supervisory or disciplinary authority, according to a sheriff’s office arrest report. He was a teacher at Alcovy High School, and both school employees and students reported the alleged sexual assaults on March 22, according to the police report obtained by Channel 2 Action News. Newton County School District spokeswoman Sherri Davis sent the news station a statement that said, in part:  “School officials launched an investigation and immediately reported the allegations to local law enforcement. Mr. Matyas was removed from the classroom setting and placed on leave during the course of the investigation. He will not return to the classroom.” He’s out of jail on a $16,700 bond, records show.
  • A White County judge denies bond for Mitch Simpson. The former Cleveland car dealer closed his auto lot earlier this year; he was arrested in March on theft charges.From WSB TV…   A north Georgia car dealer was denied bond Thursday in what’s now being described as a more than $2 million fraud and theft case, prompted by a Channel 2 investigation. Mitch Simpson was arrested and charged with three counts of felony theft by conversion late last month. They were tied to unpaid state vehicle taxes in which nearly 60 buyers say they paid Mitch Simpson Motors for their purchases, but their TAVT taxes were left unpaid and their titles were never delivered. Those purchases spanned a time period between late 2018 and early 2019, right before the Cleveland dealership shut its doors, and the buyers came to Channel 2 after unsuccessful attempts to contact Simpson. Soon the Georgia Department of Revenue began working with the White County Sheriff’s Office and state Attorney General’s Office to investigate the case. On Thursday, the Georgia DOR filed two additional theft charges in the case and argued against bond in Simpson’s case. A prosecutor revealed a much larger, complex case while highlighting Simpson’s 2011 federal conviction in a car loan scam. He served probation in the case, while several other co-defendants went to federal prison. In addition to $385,000 in unpaid vehicle taxes that were collected, prosecutors say Simpson failed to pay multiple floor planning companies $780,000 for vehicles they financed. Those companies essentially act as a bank for car dealerships, lending them the money to provide inventory on car lots. In a third tier of the ongoing investigation, prosecutors allege Simpson double and sometimes triple-financed the same vehicle through the lenders, pocketing about $1.3 million. Simpson’s attorney hit back at those allegations after a state investigator told the court Simpson’s personal bank records had been subpoenaed but not yet analyzed. Search warrants netted titles and documents from Simpson’s Habersham County home, as investigators say evidence was taken out of the car dealership building. “He has a compelling story, and there are certainly issues with the state’s case,” defense attorney Jeff Wolff told Channel 2 investigative reporter Nicole Carr. Wolff highlighted in court that Simpson simply managed the namesake lot and that it was owned by his former in-laws.  No one else has been charged in the case, and employees of McGregor Financial, the dealership’s in-house financing company, have cooperated with investigators. They’ve maintained their role was financing and Simpson had access to accounts and paid the bills, according to investigators’ testimony. “It was an underfunded business,” Wolff said. “And that’s a large gap between an underfunded business and criminal enterprise.” About a half-dozen friends and family members served as character witnesses for Simpson, arguing against a notion that he’d serve as a flight risk in this case. Perhaps his strongest supporter was his 86-year-old mother, Elsie Hogan, who said Simpson never had a desire to leave his north Georgia roots, even when he faced trouble in his earlier federal case. “He says he’ll never fly until he gets his wings and goes to heaven,” Hogan said. Hogan also revealed she’d used yard sale money to pay for Simpson’s heart medication while he was in jail. She pushed back against any suggestion that he’d profited from stolen car lot funds. “He has no money at all. He has nothing. He has nothing, sir,” Hogan said, answering Wolff’s questions. Nonetheless, Superior Court Judge Joy Parks ruled against bond in the case, citing the complexity and seriousness of the newly-revealed allegations. A grand jury is set to convene in June. The good news for Simpson’s car buyers is that they are receiving their titles. Fifty-three of the car buyers affected are from Georgia, and the state says it worked with those floor planning companies to get the missing titles. “We've been able to obtain 52 (titles) with the help of the Attorney General's Office. It's been a great win for us,” said Josh Waites, director of special investigations for the Georgia Department of Revenue. The department says it continues to receive complaints tied to purchases from Simpson. Outside of court, car buyers Paul Cleiman and Justin Mathis thanked Channel 2 for exposing the case. Both men have either received titles or expect them any day after four months of uncertainty. “It’s been a long battle,” said Mathis. “We appreciate you, Nicole. We wouldn’t be here today without you.” 'I don’t think it was getting any attention until you stepped in and got the Department of Revenue involved,” Cleiman said. “We need justice, and I think that’s been served today for now.”

Bulldog News

  • ATHENS — Georgia coach Kirby Smart and his staff will spend hours breaking down film of the G-Day Game exhibition, and the players will, too. But there are some things that don’t require any sort of instant replay and should have been obvious to all. Here are three quick takeaways from the Bulldogs’ annual scrimmage: Backup QBs better than expected For all the hand-wringing that took place when Georgia’s primary backup transferred to Ohio State, the Bulldogs look to be in good shape at the position. Saturday wasn’t Jake Fromm’s best day, but everyone has seen enough from the rising junior and team captain to know he’ll deliver in 2019. RELATED: Jake Fromm ‘didn’t play up to the standard’ Former UGA walk-on and junior college QB Stetson Bennett and early enrollee D’Wan Mathis were two of the most pleasant surprises for many in the G-Day Game, however. Teammates saw what Bennett could do in bowl practices in 2017, and Smart said during the SEC Network broadcast that he had already seen what Mathis was capable of during spring drills. But for Bennett and Mathis to look so good — each in his own way — with the bright lights showing and fans in the stands had to help the coaches sleep easier while validating James Coley’s promotion to offensive coordinator for the few remaining doubters. Bennett was the most efficient quarterback on the team on Saturday, looking comfortable in the pocket when taking snaps for the Red Team and Black Team. Bennett was a combined 12-of-23 passing for 210 yards with a TD and no sacks. The 6-foot-6 Mathis showed off his big arm (a well-placed deep pass was dropped) and eye-popping foot speed. The freshman from metro Detroit was 15-of-28 for 113 yards with an interception, but he also had a 20-yard scramble and caught a 39-yard TD pass on a trick play. Secondary on point Georgia’s award-winning film crew has put out tremendous highlights on its Twitter account through spring and, let’s face it, the sight of a receiver skying high to catch a pass is more pleasing to the football eye than a DB deflecting a pass. But Saturday showed us what else has been happening behind the walls Smart has put up around the program, and it didn’t take long. Eric Stokes burst on the scene at Missouri last season, and since then it seems at each turn he’s making plays and standing out. Stokes’ Pick-6 of Fromm on the opening drive was a “Wow” moment, and the first-team secondary made lift hard on the starting quarterback the rest of the day. The UGA quarterbacks were a combined 43-of-83 for 489 yards with 3 TDs and 2 interceptions — and were sacked seven times. Considering the quarterbacks weren’t “live,” and the defense was laying off on big hits, those are not overly impressive passing numbers. Mark Webb had 3 pass break-ups to lead the secondary, and William Poole and D.J. Daniel each had 2. In addition to Stokes’ interception, Latavious Brini also had a pick. There were only two runs of 20 yards or more — Swift had a 27-yarder, and Mathis sprinted for 20 — and two conventional passes that went for more than 25 yards. Early enrollee Lewis Cine, the No. 3-ranked safety in the 2019 class, had 8 tackles — sharing team-high honors with returning safety starter Richard LeCounte.   Eric Stokes talking about his Pick-6 at the beginning of #GDay pic.twitter.com/Tt4gVHsLtb — 960 The Ref (@960theref) April 20, 2019   Program locked in The Georgia G-Day Game had every reason to be a flop, the cold, damp and windy weather was horrid, and one of the most electrifying players on the team was sidelined by illness. Instead, more than 50,000 Bulldogs tuned out and the Red Team and Black Team came sprinting out of different tunnels and played with great exuberance. A mic’d up Smart put the showbiz aside, interrupting questions and breaking sentences mid-stream to coach his team with every bit of the same fervor he shows in practice each day. Everybody on the team was intent on having their best day, which only seemed to make Fromm feel worse in the post game as he repeatedly beat himself up over his performance. That’s how intense and locked in the Georgia football program is right now, from the fan base, to the head coach, into the locker room and spilling out on the field Saturday. Georgia football DawgNation G-Day Game WATCH: Matt Landers discusses his G-Day performance WATCH: Georgia G-Day Game beat writers breakdown RELATED: Eric Stokes experiences good and bad at cornerback WATCH: Kirby Smart shares thoughts on G-Day Game Georgia football lands major commitment on G-Day Demetris Robertson illness revealed by Kirby Smart Stock report from Georgia G-Day Game Instant analysis of Georgia football G-Day Game Georgia G-Day Game football report card   The post 3 takeaways from G-Day: Georgia football quarterbacks surprise appeared first on DawgNation.
  • G-Day in Athens is much more than what happens on the field of play. 
  • ATHENS — Clearly, the Georgia Bulldogs have big plans for Matt Landers. Believe it or not, they’re not based on him throwing touchdown passes. Landers, a 6-foot-5 redshirt freshman receiver from Pinellas, Fla., was unable to haul in a touchdown catch during the G-Day Game on Saturday. But he threw for one. The 39-yard TD throw came on a reverse off a lateral from running back James Cook and it was caught by quarterback D’Wan Mathis midway through the third quarter. That gave Landers something Mathis wanted — a TD pass — and Mathis something Landers wanted — a TD catch. But nobody was complaining afterward. “I didn’t see that coming,” Landers said with a laugh. How could he have? Landers said they didn’t even practice the play. He said it was something that Georgia offensive coordinator James Coley drew up for the Black Team during Friday’s meeting-room preparations. Coley made it clear they were going to run it on Saturday. They just weren’t sure when or how well it would work. “It worked,” Landers said with a laugh. “We didn’t practice it at at all. We just went over it. Coach Coley drew it up and we came out here and did it today. It just worked.” To perfection, in fact. It’s nothing that we all haven’t seen in little league, or somewhere along the line. Running back James Cook went left and took a handoff from Mathis, who went right. So did Landers, coming from the left side of the field on a revers. “The DB that was on me came on a blitz and they tackled Cook, so they thought the play was over,” Mathis said. “When he pitched it to me, I saw D’Wan wide open and I knew that was my chance to throw. The ball came out good and we executed and scored.” That was a fun play, but not really what Landers was focused on coming into Saturday’s scrimmage or going out. Landers was targeted early and often in Saturday’s G-Day Game. In the end, though, he came away with only two catches for 54 yards. That 52 of those yards came on one catch did help him process the disappointment. “Really it’s just getting an opportunity,” said Landers, who was a 3-star prospect coming out of St. Petersburg High Schoo. “Seeing that a lot of guys left, I knew I was going to be the guy that had to step up. I’d been hearing I have a lot of potential, but I just wanted to go out there and see for myself.” Landers was targeted on deep balls at least two other times on Saturday. But he was unable to come down with either one, a point of contention for coach Kirby Smart. “We’ve seen flashes of really good things from Matt; we’re seeing more of those flashes; with those flashes, we’ve got to see him come down with some 50-50 balls,” Smart said. “There were a couple of balls I thought he should have pulled down early and get going. He’s become a better special teams player, too. He’s able to contribute and been more competitive. We need Matt to really step up for us.” That’s not the first time Landers has heard that. He has been hearing it from receivers coach Cortez Hankton and pretty much everybody else who sees him practice every day. With the departures of leading wideouts Riley Ridley, Mecole Hardman and Terry Godwin, it’s hard not to notice the tall kid from Florida who also happens to be one of the team’s fastest players. “He’s fast, he’s got great hands, he comes out of breaks great. He’s a special talent,” quarterback Stetson Bennett said. “He’s still trying to get everything together but, gosh, he’s really good. I love throwing to him. Nobody’s telling us to do that. We just believe in him.” Obviously the Georgia coaches share that belief. They must to trust him to take a pitch and throw a bomb downfield without ever rehearsing it in practice. But that’s not what the Bulldogs are looking for from Landers. Catching balls should be good enough from now on. “Matt’s had a good spring,” Smart said. “Matt’s level of consistency has to improve. Matt has to play to Matt’s standard all the time.”   The post WATCH: Matt Landers on his TD pass and trying to crack Georgia’s WR rotation appeared first on DawgNation.
  • ATHENS — Georgia quarterback Jake Fromm didn’t take any hits in the G-Day Game on Saturday. Good thing, because Fromm spent most of the post game beating himself up. This, despite his Red Team winning the annual scrimmage over the Black Team by a 22-17 count at Sanford Stadium. “ It is what is it, everybody else on offense played really well, and I didn’t play up to the standard that I wanted to play,” Fromm said. “But as an offensive unit, we played well, we moved the ball.” Fromm was 14-of-29 passing for 116 yards with a touchdown and an interception Fromm, it’s worth noting, ranked fifth in the nation in passing efficiency last season. Sophomore cornerback Eric Stokes picked off Fromm’s second pass attempt of the game and returned it 39 yards for a touchdown. Junior go-to receiver J.J. Holloman slipped on the play, and that enabled Stokes to jump the route, and he out-fought Holloman for the football. Fromm, the only returning permanent captain from the 2018 season, declined to place any blame on anyone but himself. “Every now and then there’s that game,” Fromm said. “(A) ball that’s a little wet when it’s a little windy.” Fromm conceded the offensive playbook was watered down. Georgia obviously was not wanting to show the new elements coordinator James Coley has added.   But, Fromm pointed out, the defense was limited, too. “It’s a couple factors, obviously some days you have it, some days you don’t,” Fromm said of his uncharacteristically mediocre stat line. “It being a spring game, pretty bland on offense. “We definitely take a lot of things off the table, but that’s part of it, and so did the defense. They did a really good job and made some plays.” Fromm was also complimentary of a Georgia fan base that put more than 50,000 in Sanford Stadium despite temperatures in the 40s on a damp and windy day. “I’m super thankful to the fans that came out with it being Easter (weekend), “ Fromm said, “it being a rainy day, and we’re super thankful for the fans who came out today, showing their love and getting to watch the work we’ve been putting in this spring.” Georgia football QB Jake Fromm Georgia football DawgNation G-Day Game WATCH: Georgia G-Day Game beat writers breakdown RELATED: Eric Stokes experiences good and bad at cornerback WATCH: Kirby Smart shares thoughts on G-Day Game Georgia football lands major commitment on G-Day Demetris Robertson illness revealed by Kirby Smart Stock report from Georgia G-Day Game Instant analysis of Georgia football G-Day Game   The post WATCH Georgia QB Jake Fromm: ‘didn’t play up to the standard’ in G-Day Game appeared first on DawgNation.