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National Govt & Politics
Text of President Donald Trump's address to Congress
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Text of President Donald Trump's address to Congress

Text of President Donald Trump's address to Congress
Photo Credit: Jamie Dupree

Text of President Donald Trump's address to Congress

Here is the text of President Trump's address to Congress, as provided by the White House:

Mr. Speaker, Mr. Vice President, Members of Congress, the First Lady of the United States, and Citizens of America:

Tonight, as we mark the conclusion of our celebration of Black History Month, we are reminded of our Nation's path toward civil rights and the work that still remains. Recent threats targeting Jewish Community Centers and vandalism of Jewish cemeteries, as well as last week's shooting in Kansas City, remind us that while we may be a Nation divided on policies, we are a country that stands united in condemning hate and evil in all its forms.

Each American generation passes the torch of truth, liberty and justice –- in an unbroken chain all the way down to the present.

That torch is now in our hands. And we will use it to light up the world. I am here tonight to deliver a message of unity and strength, and it is a message deeply delivered from my heart.

A new chapter of American Greatness is now beginning.

A new national pride is sweeping across our Nation.

And a new surge of optimism is placing impossible dreams firmly within our grasp.

What we are witnessing today is the Renewal of the American Spirit.

Our allies will find that America is once again ready to lead.

All the nations of the world -- friend or foe -- will find that America is strong, America is proud, and America is free.

In 9 years, the United States will celebrate the 250th anniversary of our founding -- 250 years since the day we declared our Independence.

It will be one of the great milestones in the history of the world.

But what will America look like as we reach our 250th year? What kind of country will we leave for our children?

I will not allow the mistakes of recent decades past to define the course of our future.

For too long, we've watched our middle class shrink as we've exported our jobs and wealth to foreign countries.

We've financed and built one global project after another, but ignored the fates of our children in the inner cities of Chicago, Baltimore, Detroit -- and so many other places throughout our land.

We've defended the borders of other nations, while leaving our own borders wide open, for anyone to cross -- and for drugs to pour in at a now unprecedented rate.

And we've spent trillions of dollars overseas, while our infrastructure at home has so badly crumbled.

Then, in 2016, the earth shifted beneath our feet. The rebellion started as a quiet protest, spoken by families of all colors and creeds -– families who just wanted a fair shot for their children, and a fair hearing for their concerns.

But then the quiet voices became a loud chorus -- as thousands of citizens now spoke out together, from cities small and large, all across our country.

Finally, the chorus became an earthquake – and the people turned out by the tens of millions, and they were all united by one very simple, but crucial demand, that America must put its own citizens first ... because only then, can we truly MAKE AMERICA GREAT AGAIN.

Dying industries will come roaring back to life. Heroic veterans will get the care they so desperately need.

Our military will be given the resources its brave warriors so richly deserve.

Crumbling infrastructure will be replaced with new roads, bridges, tunnels, airports and railways gleaming across our beautiful land.

Our terrible drug epidemic will slow down and ultimately, stop.

And our neglected inner cities will see a rebirth of hope, safety, and opportunity.

Above all else, we will keep our promises to the American people.

It's been a little over a month since my inauguration, and I want to take this moment to update the Nation on the progress I've made in keeping those promises.

Since my election, Ford, Fiat-Chrysler, General Motors, Sprint, Softbank, Lockheed, Intel, Walmart, and many others, have announced that they will invest billions of dollars in the United States and will create tens of thousands of new American jobs.

The stock market has gained almost three trillion dollars in value since the election on November 8th, a record. We've saved taxpayers hundreds of millions of dollars by bringing down the price of the fantastic new F-35 jet fighter, and will be saving billions more dollars on contracts all across our Government. We have placed a hiring freeze on non-military and non-essential Federal workers.

We have begun to drain the swamp of government corruption by imposing a 5 year ban on lobbying by executive branch officials –- and a lifetime ban on becoming lobbyists for a foreign government.

We have undertaken a historic effort to massively reduce job crushing regulations, creating a deregulation task force inside of every Government agency; imposing a new rule which mandates that for every 1 new regulation, 2 old regulations must be eliminated; and stopping a regulation that threatens the future and livelihoods of our great coal miners.

We have cleared the way for the construction of the Keystone and Dakota Access Pipelines -- thereby creating tens of thousands of jobs -- and I've issued a new directive that new American pipelines be made with American steel.

We have withdrawn the United States from the job-killing Trans-Pacific Partnership.

With the help of Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, we have formed a Council with our neighbors in Canada to help ensure that women entrepreneurs have access to the networks, markets and capital they need to start a business and live out their financial dreams.

To protect our citizens, I have directed the Department of Justice to form a Task Force on Reducing Violent Crime.

I have further ordered the Departments of Homeland Security and Justice, along with the Department of State and the Director of National Intelligence, to coordinate an aggressive strategy to dismantle the criminal cartels that have spread across our Nation.

We will stop the drugs from pouring into our country and poisoning our youth -- and we will expand treatment for those who have become so badly addicted.

At the same time, my Administration has answered the pleas of the American people for immigration enforcement and border security. By finally enforcing our immigration laws, we will raise wages, help the unemployed, save billions of dollars, and make our communities safer for everyone. We want all Americans to succeed –- but that can't happen in an environment of lawless chaos. We must restore integrity and the rule of law to our borders.

For that reason, we will soon begin the construction of a great wall along our southern border. It will be started ahead of schedule and, when finished, it will be a very effective weapon against drugs and crime.

As we speak, we are removing gang members, drug dealers and criminals that threaten our communities and prey on our citizens. Bad ones are going out as I speak tonight and as I have promised.

To any in Congress who do not believe we should enforce our laws, I would ask you this question: what would you say to the American family that loses their jobs, their income, or a loved one, because America refused to uphold its laws and defend its borders?

Our obligation is to serve, protect, and defend the citizens of the United States. We are also taking strong measures to protect our Nation from Radical Islamic Terrorism.

According to data provided by the Department of Justice, the vast majority of individuals convicted for terrorism-related offenses since 9/11 came here from outside of our country. We have seen the attacks at home -– from Boston to San Bernardino to the Pentagon and yes, even the World Trade Center.

We have seen the attacks in France, in Belgium, in Germany and all over the world.

It is not compassionate, but reckless, to allow uncontrolled entry from places where proper vetting cannot occur. Those given the high honor of admission to the United States should support this country and love its people and its values.

We cannot allow a beachhead of terrorism to form inside America -- we cannot allow our Nation to become a sanctuary for extremists.

That is why my Administration has been working on improved vetting procedures, and we will shortly take new steps to keep our Nation safe -- and to keep out those who would do us harm.

As promised, I directed the Department of Defense to develop a plan to demolish and destroy ISIS -- a network of lawless savages that have slaughtered Muslims and Christians, and men, women, and children of all faiths and beliefs. We will work with our allies, including our friends and allies in the Muslim world, to extinguish this vile enemy from our planet.

I have also imposed new sanctions on entities and individuals who support Iran's ballistic missile program, and reaffirmed our unbreakable alliance with the State of Israel.

Finally, I have kept my promise to appoint a Justice to the United States Supreme Court -- from my list of 20 judges -- who will defend our Constitution. I am honored to have Maureen Scalia with us in the gallery tonight. Her late, great husband, Antonin Scalia, will forever be a symbol of American justice. To fill his seat, we have chosen Judge Neil Gorsuch, a man of incredible skill, and deep devotion to the law. He was confirmed unanimously to the Court of Appeals, and I am asking the Senate to swiftly approve his nomination.

Tonight, as I outline the next steps we must take as a country, we must honestly acknowledge the circumstances we inherited.

Ninety-four million Americans are out of the labor force.

Over 43 million people are now living in poverty, and over 43 million Americans are on food stamps.

More than 1 in 5 people in their prime working years are not working.

We have the worst financial recovery in 65 years.

In the last 8 years, the past Administration has put on more new debt than nearly all other Presidents combined.

We've lost more than one-fourth of our manufacturing jobs since NAFTA was approved, and we've lost 60,000 factories since China joined the World Trade Organization in 2001.

Our trade deficit in goods with the world last year was nearly $800 billion dollars.

And overseas, we have inherited a series of tragic foreign policy disasters.

Solving these, and so many other pressing problems, will require us to work past the differences of party. It will require us to tap into the American spirit that has overcome every challenge throughout our long and storied history.

But to accomplish our goals at home and abroad, we must restart the engine of the American economy -- making it easier for companies to do business in the United States, and much harder for companies to leave.

Right now, American companies are taxed at one of the highest rates anywhere in the world.

My economic team is developing historic tax reform that will reduce the tax rate on our companies so they can compete and thrive anywhere and with anyone. At the same time, we will provide massive tax relief for the middle class.

We must create a level playing field for American companies and workers.

Currently, when we ship products out of America, many other countries make us pay very high tariffs and taxes -- but when foreign companies ship their products into America, we charge them almost nothing.

I just met with officials and workers from a great American company, Harley-Davidson. In fact, they proudly displayed five of their magnificent motorcycles, made in the USA, on the front lawn of the White House.

At our meeting, I asked them, how are you doing, how is business? They said that it's good. I asked them further how they are doing with other countries, mainly international sales. They told me -- without even complaining because they have been mistreated for so long that they have become used to it -- that it is very hard to do business with other countries because they tax our goods at such a high rate. They said that in one case another country taxed their motorcycles at 100 percent.

They weren't even asking for change. But I am.

I believe strongly in free trade but it also has to be FAIR TRADE.

The first Republican President, Abraham Lincoln, warned that the "abandonment of the protective policy by the American Government [will] produce want and ruin among our people."

Lincoln was right -- and it is time we heeded his words. I am not going to let America and its great companies and workers, be taken advantage of anymore.

I am going to bring back millions of jobs. Protecting our workers also means reforming our system of legal immigration. The current, outdated system depresses wages for our poorest workers, and puts great pressure on taxpayers.

Nations around the world, like Canada, Australia and many others –- have a merit-based immigration system. It is a basic principle that those seeking to enter a country ought to be able to support themselves financially. Yet, in America, we do not enforce this rule, straining the very public resources that our poorest citizens rely upon. According to the National Academy of Sciences, our current immigration system costs America's taxpayers many billions of dollars a year.

Switching away from this current system of lower-skilled immigration, and instead adopting a merit-based system, will have many benefits: it will save countless dollars, raise workers' wages, and help struggling families –- including immigrant families –- enter the middle class.

I believe that real and positive immigration reform is possible, as long as we focus on the following goals: to improve jobs and wages for Americans, to strengthen our nation’s security, and to restore respect for our laws.

If we are guided by the well-being of American citizens then I believe Republicans and Democrats can work together to achieve an outcome that has eluded our country for decades.

Another Republican President, Dwight D. Eisenhower, initiated the last truly great national infrastructure program –- the building of the interstate highway system. The time has come for a new program of national rebuilding.

America has spent approximately six trillion dollars in the Middle East, all this while our infrastructure at home is crumbling. With this six trillion dollars we could have rebuilt our country –- twice. And maybe even three times if we had people who had the ability to negotiate.

To launch our national rebuilding, I will be asking the Congress to approve legislation that produces a $1 trillion investment in the infrastructure of the United States -- financed through both public and private capital –- creating millions of new jobs.

This effort will be guided by two core principles: Buy American, and Hire American.

Tonight, I am also calling on this Congress to repeal and replace Obamacare with reforms that expand choice, increase access, lower costs, and at the same time, provide better Healthcare.

Mandating every American to buy government-approved health insurance was never the right solution for America. The way to make health insurance available to everyone is to lower the cost of health insurance, and that is what we will do.

Obamacare premiums nationwide have increased by double and triple digits. As an example, Arizona went up 116 percent last year alone. Governor Matt Bevin of Kentucky just said Obamacare is failing in his State -- it is unsustainable and collapsing.

One third of counties have only one insurer on the exchanges –- leaving many Americans with no choice at all.

Remember when you were told that you could keep your doctor, and keep your plan?

We now know that all of those promises have been broken.

Obamacare is collapsing –- and we must act decisively to protect all Americans. Action is not a choice –- it is a necessity.

So I am calling on all Democrats and Republicans in the Congress to work with us to save Americans from this imploding Obamacare disaster.

Here are the principles that should guide the Congress as we move to create a better healthcare system for all Americans:

First, we should ensure that Americans with pre-existing conditions have access to coverage, and that we have a stable transition for Americans currently enrolled in the healthcare exchanges.

Secondly, we should help Americans purchase their own coverage, through the use of tax credits and expanded Health Savings Accounts –- but it must be the plan they want, not the plan forced on them by the Government.

Thirdly, we should give our great State Governors the resources and flexibility they need with Medicaid to make sure no one is left out.

Fourthly, we should implement legal reforms that protect patients and doctors from unnecessary costs that drive up the price of insurance – and work to bring down the artificially high price of drugs and bring them down immediately.

Finally, the time has come to give Americans the freedom to purchase health insurance across State lines –- creating a truly competitive national marketplace that will bring cost way down and provide far better care.

Everything that is broken in our country can be fixed. Every problem can be solved. And every hurting family can find healing, and hope.

Our citizens deserve this, and so much more –- so why not join forces to finally get it done? On this and so many other things, Democrats and Republicans should get together and unite for the good of our country, and for the good of the American people.

My administration wants to work with members in both parties to make childcare accessible and affordable, to help ensure new parents have paid family leave, to invest in women's health, and to promote clean air and clear water, and to rebuild our military and our infrastructure.

True love for our people requires us to find common ground, to advance the common good, and to cooperate on behalf of every American child who deserves a brighter future.

An incredible young woman is with us this evening who should serve as an inspiration to us all.

Today is Rare Disease day, and joining us in the gallery is a Rare Disease Survivor, Megan Crowley. Megan was diagnosed with Pompe Disease, a rare and serious illness, when she was 15 months old. She was not expected to live past 5.

On receiving this news, Megan's dad, John, fought with everything he had to save the life of his precious child. He founded a company to look for a cure, and helped develop the drug that saved Megan's life. Today she is 20 years old -- and a sophomore at Notre Dame.

Megan's story is about the unbounded power of a father's love for a daughter.

But our slow and burdensome approval process at the Food and Drug Administration keeps too many advances, like the one that saved Megan's life, from reaching those in need.

If we slash the restraints, not just at the FDA but across our Government, then we will be blessed with far more miracles like Megan.

In fact, our children will grow up in a Nation of miracles.

But to achieve this future, we must enrich the mind –- and the souls –- of every American child.

Education is the civil rights issue of our time.

I am calling upon Members of both parties to pass an education bill that funds school choice for disadvantaged youth, including millions of African-American and Latino children. These families should be free to choose the public, private, charter, magnet, religious or home school that is right for them.

Joining us tonight in the gallery is a remarkable woman, Denisha Merriweather. As a young girl, Denisha struggled in school and failed third grade twice. But then she was able to enroll in a private center for learning, with the help of a tax credit scholarship program. Today, she is the first in her family to graduate, not just from high school, but from college. Later this year she will get her masters degree in social work.

We want all children to be able to break the cycle of poverty just like Denisha.

But to break the cycle of poverty, we must also break the cycle of violence.

The murder rate in 2015 experienced its largest single-year increase in nearly half a century.

In Chicago, more than 4,000 people were shot last year alone –- and the murder rate so far this year has been even higher.

This is not acceptable in our society.

Every American child should be able to grow up in a safe community, to attend a great school, and to have access to a high-paying job.

But to create this future, we must work with –- not against -– the men and women of law enforcement.

We must build bridges of cooperation and trust –- not drive the wedge of disunity and division.

Police and sheriffs are members of our community. They are friends and neighbors, they are mothers and fathers, sons and daughters – and they leave behind loved ones every day who worry whether or not they'll come home safe and sound.

We must support the incredible men and women of law enforcement.

And we must support the victims of crime.

I have ordered the Department of Homeland Security to create an office to serve American Victims. The office is called VOICE –- Victims Of Immigration Crime Engagement. We are providing a voice to those who have been ignored by our media, and silenced by special interests.

Joining us in the audience tonight are four very brave Americans whose government failed them.

Their names are Jamiel Shaw, Susan Oliver, Jenna Oliver, and Jessica Davis.

Jamiel's 17-year-old son was viciously murdered by an illegal immigrant gang member, who had just been released from prison. Jamiel Shaw Jr. was an incredible young man, with unlimited potential who was getting ready to go to college where he would have excelled as a great quarterback. But he never got the chance. His father, who is in the audience tonight, has become a good friend of mine.

Also with us are Susan Oliver and Jessica Davis. Their husbands –- Deputy Sheriff Danny Oliver and Detective Michael Davis –- were slain in the line of duty in California. They were pillars of their community. These brave men were viciously gunned down by an illegal immigrant with a criminal record and two prior deportations.

Sitting with Susan is her daughter, Jenna. Jenna: I want you to know that your father was a hero, and that tonight you have the love of an entire country supporting you and praying for you.

To Jamiel, Jenna, Susan and Jessica: I want you to know –- we will never stop fighting for justice. Your loved ones will never be forgotten, we will always honor their memory.

Finally, to keep America Safe we must provide the men and women of the United States military with the tools they need to prevent war and –- if they must –- to fight and to win.

I am sending the Congress a budget that rebuilds the military, eliminates the Defense sequester, and calls for one of the largest increases in national defense spending in American history.

My budget will also increase funding for our veterans.

Our veterans have delivered for this Nation –- and now we must deliver for them.

The challenges we face as a Nation are great. But our people are even greater.

And none are greater or braver than those who fight for America in uniform.

We are blessed to be joined tonight by Carryn Owens, the widow of a U.S. Navy Special Operator, Senior Chief William "Ryan" Owens. Ryan died as he lived: a warrior, and a hero –- battling against terrorism and securing our Nation.

I just spoke to General Mattis, who reconfirmed that, and I quote, "Ryan was a part of a highly successful raid that generated large amounts of vital intelligence that will lead to many more victories in the future against our enemies." Ryan's legacy is etched into eternity. For as the Bible teaches us, there is no greater act of love than to lay down one's life for one's friends. Ryan laid down his life for his friends, for his country, and for our freedom –- we will never forget him.

To those allies who wonder what kind of friend America will be, look no further than the heroes who wear our uniform.

Our foreign policy calls for a direct, robust and meaningful engagement with the world. It is American leadership based on vital security interests that we share with our allies across the globe.

We strongly support NATO, an alliance forged through the bonds of two World Wars that dethroned fascism, and a Cold War that defeated communism.

But our partners must meet their financial obligations.

And now, based on our very strong and frank discussions, they are beginning to do just that.

We expect our partners, whether in NATO, in the Middle East, or the Pacific –- to take a direct and meaningful role in both strategic and military operations, and pay their fair share of the cost.

We will respect historic institutions, but we will also respect the sovereign rights of nations.

Free nations are the best vehicle for expressing the will of the people –- and America respects the right of all nations to chart their own path. My job is not to represent the world. My job is to represent the United States of America. But we know that America is better off, when there is less conflict -- not more.

We must learn from the mistakes of the past –- we have seen the war and destruction that have raged across our world.

The only long-term solution for these humanitarian disasters is to create the conditions where displaced persons can safely return home and begin the long process of rebuilding.

America is willing to find new friends, and to forge new partnerships, where shared interests align. We want harmony and stability, not war and conflict.

We want peace, wherever peace can be found. America is friends today with former enemies. Some of our closest allies, decades ago, fought on the opposite side of these World Wars. This history should give us all faith in the possibilities for a better world.

Hopefully, the 250th year for America will see a world that is more peaceful, more just and more free.

On our 100th anniversary, in 1876, citizens from across our Nation came to Philadelphia to celebrate America's centennial. At that celebration, the country's builders and artists and inventors showed off their creations.

Alexander Graham Bell displayed his telephone for the first time.

Remington unveiled the first typewriter. An early attempt was made at electric light.

Thomas Edison showed an automatic telegraph and an electric pen.

Imagine the wonders our country could know in America's 250th year.

Think of the marvels we can achieve if we simply set free the dreams of our people.

Cures to illnesses that have always plagued us are not too much to hope.

American footprints on distant worlds are not too big a dream.

Millions lifted from welfare to work is not too much to expect.

And streets where mothers are safe from fear -- schools where children learn in peace -- and jobs where Americans prosper and grow -- are not too much to ask.

When we have all of this, we will have made America greater than ever before. For all Americans.

This is our vision. This is our mission.

But we can only get there together.

We are one people, with one destiny.

We all bleed the same blood.

We all salute the same flag.

And we are all made by the same God.

And when we fulfill this vision; when we celebrate our 250 years of glorious freedom, we will look back on tonight as when this new chapter of American Greatness began.

The time for small thinking is over. The time for trivial fights is behind us.

We just need the courage to share the dreams that fill our hearts.

The bravery to express the hopes that stir our souls.

And the confidence to turn those hopes and dreams to action.

From now on, America will be empowered by our aspirations, not burdened by our fears –-

inspired by the future, not bound by the failures of the past –-

and guided by our vision, not blinded by our doubts.

I am asking all citizens to embrace this Renewal of the American Spirit. I am asking all members of Congress to join me in dreaming big, and bold and daring things for our country. And I am asking everyone watching tonight to seize this moment and --

Believe in yourselves.

Believe in your future.

And believe, once more, in America.

Thank you, God bless you, and God Bless these United States.

THE WHITE HOUSE,

February 28, 2017.

###

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  • You'll want to be aware about an increasing storm threat for this afternoon and evening.  We'll start the day dry and warm but will finish with the chance for strong storms.  The main risks later today will be strong wind gusts, large hail and heavy rain. The tornado risk is very low with this system. A cold front moves through tonight into tomorrow with cooler air to follow. We'll lose the mid-70s we had Sunday in the metro.  
  • From the Clarke Co Sheriff’s Office... The Georgia Supreme Court has held OCGA § 42-1-14(e) as unconstitutional, in that the law requires a person who is classified as a sexually dangerous predator – but who is no longer in State custody or on probation or parole – wear and pay for a GPS monitoring device that allows the State to monitor that individual’s location.    The Court noted an individual who is still serving a criminal sentence, either on probation or parole may have a reduced expectation of privacy. However, the same is not true of an individual who has completed the entirety of his or her criminal sentence, including his or her parole and/or probation requirements. The Court determined, individuals who have completed their sentences do not have a reduced expectation of privacy that would render their wearing a GPS monitoring device reasonable. The Court concluded, OCGA § 42-1-14 (e) is unconstitutional on its face to the extent that individuals, like Park, who are no longer serving any part of their sentences.    Given the court’s ruling, the Clarke County Sheriff’s Office removed the ankle monitor of Deon Williams, a registered sex offender in Athens-Clarke County. Williams is listed as a sexually dangerous predator with the Georgia Bureau of Investigation Sex Offender Registry.
  • Each week the Athens Community Council on Aging and its 200 volunteers deliver over 1,300 meals to homebound adults in Clarke and Barrow counties through the Meals on Wheels program. Some of the 300-plus clients are older adults who have difficulty getting out, while others suffer from disabilities that prevent them from leaving home. This service not only provides individuals with meals but serves as a safety check. Many of ACCA’s Meals on Wheels clients are at an increased risk for medical emergencies, falls and other accidents, and it is often difficult for them to get to doctor appointments. Dr. Don Scott was quick to recognize this growing problem after he began volunteering with the ACCA. Scott, one of the few practicing geriatric physicians in the Athens area, is an Augusta University/ University of Georgia Medical Partnership faculty member. He reached out to Eve Anthony, chief executive officer of the ACCA, to see how he could help. “He immediately recognized the challenges we face as an organization for those clients who are experiencing health and wellness issues, and the numerous Meals on Wheels clients who may not have a primary care provider,” said Anthony. Recognizing a need As the campus director of geriatrics and palliative care, Scott oversees the AU/UGA Medical Partnership Internal Medicine Residency Program’s geriatrics rotation in partnership with St. Mary’s Health Care System. In 2016, the residency program collaborated with the ACCA to make home visits to the Athens-area Meals on Wheels clients part of their geriatrics rotation. “My goal for the residents visiting the homebound clients is to understand what it means to be a frail, homebound older adult with unique needs,” said Scott. “Whether that need is primary care, or simply to adjust their walker, we want to help out any way we can. Most clients have a regular physician, but they often miss appointments due to their decreased physical function or transportation barriers.” The ACCA recommends clients to Scott’s team based on the highest level of need. So far, the internal medicine residents and Scott have visited over 30 homebound individuals in the Athens area, totaling more than $5,000 of free care. Those numbers are continuing to grow. From adjusting their blood pressure medication to organizing their prescription drugs to providing home safety visits for those with mental health issues, Scott and his team see a variety of issues. One of Scott’s favorite stories is about a woman who needed the brakes repaired on her rollator. He made ACCA aware of the situation and they worked with a local bike shop to make that repair. Another visit led to helping a woman get her dog to a veterinarian. Scott is currently working with the ACCA to assist in restoring water to a patient who has no functioning plumbing. “Having Dr. Scott and the residents in the client’s home doing in-depth assessments gives us access to information on that particular client’s needs that we may not have,” Anthony said. The clients are very appreciative of Scott and the residents. Jacqueline Moses said, “I love having Dr. Scott visit. It is more personalized than a standard doctor’s appointment and he can help me understand the physician’s orders.” Teaching empathy The residents benefit from the program as well by gaining an increased awareness of the day-to-day challenges these patients face. Going into homes, rather than seeing patients only in an office or hospital, gives residents a new perspective and allows them to develop better patient care plans. This rotation also allows the residents to observe how their treatment plans impact patients. Second-year resident Rida Younus said, “It helps us truly access the patient as a whole, to not only address their medical needs but their living conditions, which may sometimes make it hard for them to follow through with plans discussed in the office.” Anthony agreed. “Through this partnership we are teaching a new group of physicians a greater understanding of the issues facing older adults.” Public recognition In recognition of his hard work, Scott and the AU/UGA Internal Medicine Residency Program were awarded the 2018 ACCA’s Community Partner of the Year award. As an agency, the ACCA acknowledges it cannot meet the Athens community’s needs alone and recognizes they can do more when aligning their mission with others who share those same goals. “Dr. Scott has gone above and beyond to make himself a resource for our clients,” Anthony said. “His willingness to work with individuals through unusual circumstances allows ACCA to better serve their clients. He is a truly great ally to have in our corner.”   
  • A committee that is overseeing work on projects that are being funded by the transportation sales tax approved by Athens-Clarke County voters in 2017 meets today: it’s a 5:30 session at City Hall in downtown Athens.  Madison County Commissioners meet tonight: it’s a 6 o’clock session at the Government Complex in Danielsville.  The Bowman City Council will welcome Pete Gibbons back to the mayor’s podium Monday during the council’s regular meeting. The council meeting begins at 7 at Bowman City Hall Today marks the start of the second week of early voting in the third election to fill the District 28 seat in the Georgia House: two previous elections were tossed out because of problems with voters casting ballots in the wrong district. Former Banks County School Superintendent Chris Erwin won both those elections, defeating Republican incumbent Dan Gasaway. The early voting ends April 5; election day itself is April 9. Voters are casting ballots in parts of Banks, Stephens, and Habersham counties.  Habersham County government offices that were closed last Friday are reopening this morning in new headquarters off Toccoa Highway in Clarkesville. Habersham County Commissioners will hold the first meetings in the new facility today: they’re holding budget sessions with the heads of various Habersham County government agencies. 

Bulldog News

  • ATHENS — Two Georgia football players were charged with disorderly conduct after a “chaotic scene” erupted at a downtown Athens bar in the early Sunday morning hours, according to a statement released by the Athens-Clarke County Police Department. The investigation is ongoing as the department continues to work to learn who was involved in the incident. Georgia senior receiver Tyler Simmons was charged along with freshman Tyrique Stevenson as a result of an incident that originated inside the Cloud Bar on Sunday morning. Simmons and Stevenson were identified as “subjects allegedly fighting with bar employees,” according to the statement.   RELATED: Georgia 5-star freshman charged after Sunday morning incident An off-duty Athens-Clarke County Police officer who was working at the bar called for assistance after being alerted a 12:50 a.m. that a fight was taking place inside. Multiple officers responded to the scene, as numerous bar patrons spilled out onto the sidewalk and street, per the statement. The Cloud Bar did not press charges against Simmons and Stevenson. After restoring order, the Athens-Clark County Police Department charged Simmons and Stevens with disorderly conduct and took them to the jail. Stevens was booked and released after posting bond. Simmons, however, was not booked because he had complained of an injury upon arriving at the jail, which required him to be taken to a local hospital where he was treated and released. Georgia football coach Kirby Smart has yet to issue a statement on the incident. The Bulldogs held their third spring practice on Saturday, donning pads for the first time this offseason. Smart, a University of Georgia graduate entering his fourth season as head coach, had expressed concerns with leadership earlier in the week. “I’ve never felt great about leadership at this point in time,  I didn’t feel great two years ago, I didn’t feel great last year,” Smart said last Tuesday. “I think you can’t find true leadership, and you can’t manipulate it. You can’t make it happen.” Bulldogs reserve linebacker Jaden Hunter was booked last Wednesday by UGA police  for illegally stopping, standing or parking a vehicle and driving with a suspended/revoked license. Backup defensive back Latavious Brini was charged a fter allegedly slapping a man outside of an Athens bar on Feb 28. Brini has continued to practice with the team. “This type of behavior is extremely disappointing and not representative of the standards for our football student-athletes,” Smart said after Brini’s incident. “His discipline will be handled internally and hopefully good lessons will be learned that will lead to better choices moving forward.” Smart, who is not scheduled to meet with the media again until Tuesday, did not issue a statement on Hunter Athens-Clarke County Statement     The post Two Georgia football players allegedly involved in ‘chaotic’ downtown Athens bar incident appeared first on DawgNation.
  • ATHENS — Solomon Kindley and Andrew Thomas have played next to each other on Georgia’s offensive line most of the last two seasons. That’s where the similarities end. Thomas, Georgia’s All-American left tackle, is quiet-spoken to the point of being introverted. Kindley, who started every game last season next to Thomas, is chatty and loquacious. He can talk about changing a lightbulb and make it into an entertaining anecdote. Kindley says those contrasting personalities are evident even during the heat of battle. “On the field, I’ll be like, ‘Andrew, we’ve got D-C-P!'” Kindley says, mimicking the act of making a line call during a game. “He’s like, ‘Yeah.’ After that we’ll run a play and I’ll be like, ‘good play!’ He’ll be like, ‘Yeah.'” Kindley is comfortable enough in his own skin to put on clown makeup and and ham it up on a visit to a children’s hospital last December in New Orleans. (Chip Towers/DawgNation) That written recounting doesn’t do justice to Kindley’s hilarious reenactment, replete with deadpan tones and facial expressions. But neither does any description when it comes to this gargantuan human being, with the style and personality to match. The 6-foot-4, 330-pound rising junior from Jacksonville has an effervescent disposition that belies the nature of his job, which is to dominate and physically overwhelm his opponent snap after offensive snap. Fresh off the field following another grueling spring practice, Kindley takes a look at the small gathering of reporters that has encircled him to hear his comments, and he grins widely. “Just another day in paradise and Georgia football,” he proclaimed happily. Don’t let Kindley’s whistling-through-life persona fool you. This is a man who has a very serious and physically-challenging job to do for the Bulldogs and approaches it accordingly. He has managed to do it well enough to start 21 games and play in all 29 his last two seasons, and that’s while Georgia continues bring blue-chip linemen to Athens by the busload. The beauty of it is Kindley does not share the same recruiting pedigree with most of his fellow guards. He came to UGA from Jacksonville as a consensus 3-star prospect who ESPN ranked as the 40th-ranked offensive guard in the nation and the 99th best prospect in the state Florida. Yet, after an initial redshirt year to get his weight and conditioning under control, Kindley has been a go-to player for line coach Sam Pittman. He started seven games at right guard next to then-right-tackle Thomas during Georgia’s run to the national championship game in 2017. Then he followed Thomas over to the left side, starting all 14 games last year as the Bulldogs led the SEC rushing on the way to an 11-3 season. It’s there, at left guard next to Thomas, that Kindley opened this spring practice with Georgia’s No. 1 offense. But he knows just because that’s where he’s starting the 2019 season, it’s where he’ll end it. Solomon Kindley (66) and Andrew Thomas (71) have proven a formidable team on the left side of Georgia’s offensive line. (AJC) “I’m never complacent with anything I do,” Kindley said following the second practice of the 15-practice spring session this past Thursday. “So, yes, I started the last 15 games or whatever it was last year; I’m trying to start every game this year. That’s the competitiveness we’ve got as an offensive line. We’ve got pushers from the first team to the fourth team. So everybody comes out to practice every day with a chip on their shoulder. If you don’t, Coach Pittman is the type of coach who will replace you no matter who you are or what you did.” Pittman certainly finds himself with a lot of options. In addition to fellow junior Ben Cleveland, with whom Kindley battled for playing time the entire 2017 seasons, the Bulldogs have continued to bring in highly-rated guards. Last year signaled the arrival of Cade Mays and Jamaree Salyer, both of them 5-star prospects. Clay Webb, a 5-star recruit out of Alabama, joined the competition this spring. Trey Hill, a 4-star recruit out of Warner Robins, also came in with that group and ended up playing a bigger role than any of them. Hill filled in for an injured Lamont Gaillard at center when Gaillard went down early in the first half of a pivotal SEC East road matchup against Kentucky. Later, after both Cleveland and Mays were lost to injuries, Hill started the last four games of the season at right guard. Hill has entered spring camp as the No. 1 center, leaving Mays, Salyer, Cleveland, Webb, Justin Shaffer and others to compete for reps at left and right guard. “Coach Pittman gets everybody ready and he’s going to put somebody there,” Kindley said, referring to center specifically. “He might put me there; you never know. Whoever he puts there is going to be a great player because that’s just the way our room is built. When your name is called and it’s time for you to be in there, you’re going to perform.” For reasons known only to him, Pittman seems to have a particular affinity for Kindley and Thomas playing next to each other on the left side. It’s hard to argue with that reasoning after Georgia established school records last season for rushing yards (3,876) and rushing touchdowns (42). The early word is that the Bulldogs may be throwing the ball around a good bit more now James Coley calling the plays as offensive coordinator. Kindley’s not about to take a guess on that. But his goals and aspirations for 2019 suggest he expects that. To start with, he’s trimmer, or at least as svelte as somebody who weighs 340 pounds can be. Kindley said he weighs the same as he did last season, but is stronger and better conditioned. His hope is that will translate to the job is trying to do on the field. “Everybody’s got improvement to do no matter good you are,” Kindley said. “The biggest thing for me getting more dominant and stronger in my pass protection, getting my hands set, little stuff like that.” In the meantime, Kindley is happy to be paired again — at least for the moment — with Thomas on Georgia’s left flank. He said though they have markedly different personalities, he and Thomas remain best of friends, attending movies together on occasion and just hanging out whenever time permits. “He’s cool people,” Kindley said with a laugh. What would be really cool, Kindley said, would be for the Bulldogs to play this season the way he they believe they’re capable of. “However good your offensive line is is however good your team is going to be,” Kindley said, almost preaching it. “So if our offensive and defensive lines are very good, then the sky’s the limit for us. That’s just the motto in our room; that’s the chip on our shoulder. If we’re good, we’re going to the national championship. We’re going to beat everybody and anybody who lines up against us. That’s just how we see things. We’re the best on the field and nobody can hang with us.” We’re left to assume that Kindley’s probably speaking on behalf of Thomas, and the rest of Georgia’s O-line as well. The post Solomon Kindley speaks for Georgia’s offensive line: ‘I want to dominate and win a national championship appeared first on DawgNation.
  • “The game speaks to you. If you’re paying attention to it, the game will be telling you what to do.” — Two-time Olympic softball gold medalist Michele Smith ATHENS — Georgia softball has arguably the best hitter in the nation in Alyssa DiCarlo, but as the saying goes, there’s a reason they call it fast “pitch.” The No. 12-ranked Bulldogs (25-9, 1-5 SEC) either lack the pitching or aren’t using it correctly at this stage of the season. The result has been a five-game losing streak — UGA’s longest in two years — and a three-game sweep at the hands of No. 6 LSU (28-6, 7-2). The Tigers used four pitchers in a 7-4 win over the Bulldogs at Jack Turner Stadium on Sunday, spoiling Georgia’s ESPN debut this season. The nation looked on along with a puzzled capacity crowd of 1,751 as the Bulldogs’ coaching staff  left junior Alley Cutting in the circle for seven innings to absorb all nine hits and five runs. It was surprising because the Tigers had seen 4 2/3 innings of Cutting, a transfer from Kennesaw State, in Saturday’s loss to LSU. Teams hit better against pitchers the more they see them. DiCarlo, meanwhile, has proven capable of hitting any pitcher, any time. DiCarlo, one of seven returning starters from last season’s Women’s College World Series team, drove her nation-leading 18th home run out of the park in tying the Georgia career RBI record (236). LSU had wisely walked DiCarlo her first two at-bats before she drove a two-strike pitch over the wall to pull the Bulldogs to within 5-1 in the bottom of the fifth inning. Georgia put another rally together in the sixth inning, a solo home run by Justice Milz and a two-run shot from Ciara Bryan cut the deficit to 5-4. But with a runner on first LSU wisely walked DiCarlo, and two batters later, Mahlena O’Neal lined out to right field with the bases loaded to end the inning. LSU responded by adding two insurance runs off Cutting in the 7th, driving hard shots outside the foul lines when it wasn’t putting the ball into play. Georgia associate head coach Tony Baldwin, who now speaks on behalf of head coach Lu Harris-Champer on a regular basis, didn’t offer much of an explanation for how the pitching staff was managed. Instead he said LSU is a good hitting team — just like Georgia and many of the other SEC teams, with nine ranked in the most recent ESPN Top 25. “We have a good offensive team, we have good hitters, and we have to be in there prepared to get into the fight better,” Baldwin said, referring to UGA surrendering three runs in the first inning. “We lost a few too many moments early.” It has been the story of the season for Georgia. The Bulldogs have been unable to put it all together, the coaches struggling to find the proper batting order. Georgia stranded 11 runners in the first game of the series against LSU, 8 in the second, and 9 in Sunday’s defeat. DiCarlo said the team will continue to compete. “I’m excited about the fight that we’ve shown,” said DiCarlo, who was flawless at shortstop with four assists on Sunday. “We learned a lot from this weekend. “I think we’ll come out stronger and win more moments.” It will be up to Harris-Champer, in her 19th year as head coach, to figure out the bullpen and the batting lineup if Georgia is to avoid a sixth straight loss on Wednesday night against Georgia Southern (6 p.m.). Georgia softball star Alyssa DiCarlo Georgia softball assistant coach Tony Baldwin The post Georgia softball power goes to waste, LSU sweeps fading Bulldogs appeared first on DawgNation.
  • ATHENS — Georgia freshman cornerback Tyrique Stevenson was arrested early Sunday morning on charges of disorderly conduct, according to the Athens-Clarke County jail booking recap. The Athens Clark County police department arrested Stevenson at 2:42 a.m. Sunday morning on the misdemeanor charge and he was released at 3:26 a.m. after posting a $1,000 bond. Stevenson is a 5-star recruit from Homestead, Fla., who attended Miami Southridge High School before enrolling in January at the University of Georgia. Stevenson is the third Georgia football player who has been arrested in the last month Smart said last Tuesday he had concerns about the leadership on his team. “I’ve never felt great about leadership at this point in time,  I didn’t feel great two years ago, I didn’t feel great last year,” Smart said. “I think you can’t find true leadership, and you can’t manipulate it. You can’t make it happen.” All three players arrested in the last month play on defense, where UGA has a new coordinator in 32-year-old Dan Lanning. Bulldogs reserve linebacker Jaden Hunter was arrested last Wednesday by UGA police  for illegally stopping, standing or parking a vehicle and driving with a suspended/revoked license. Latavious Brini was arrested and charged with simple battery — a misdemeanor level charge — a fter allegedly slapping a man outside of an Athens bar on Feb 28. Brini has continued to practice with the team. “This type of behavior is extremely disappointing and not representative of the standards for our football student-athletes,” Smart said after Brini’s arrest. “His discipline will be handled internally and hopefully good lessons will be learned that will lead to better choices moving forward.” Smart has yet to issue a statement on Stevenson.   The post Georgia 5-star freshman DB arrested on disorderly conduct charge appeared first on DawgNation.