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Business Headlines

    British Prime Minister Boris Johnson is pressing ahead to try to win parliamentary backing for his new Brexit deal as the European Union considers his grudging request to extend the looming Oct. 31 Brexit deadline. Johnson late Saturday sent an unsigned letter to the EU seeking a delay to Britain's impending departure from the bloc, as required by law. But he followed it with a signed letter indicating that he does not favor another extension. EU officials have not responded to the request. Johnson could face legal challenges from opponents who feel that sending the second letter was done to frustrate Parliament, which has not approved his Brexit plan but does want to avoid a no-deal Brexit. Johnson returns to Parliament on Monday to keep seeking support for his Brexit proposal, which was approved Thursday by EU leaders.
  • Responding to stinging criticism, President Donald Trump has abruptly reversed his plan to hold the next Group of Seven world leaders' meeting at his Doral, Florida, golf resort next year. Trump announced a rare backtrack Saturday night after facing accusations that he was using the presidency to enrich himself by hosting the international summit at a private resort owned by his family. 'Based on both Media & Democrat Crazed and Irrational Hostility, we will no longer consider Trump National Doral, Miami, as the Host Site for the G-7 in 2020,' Trump tweeted. He said his administration 'will begin the search for another site, including the possibility of Camp David, immediately.' The striking reversal raises further doubts about the position of the president's acting chief of staff, Mick Mulvaney, who held a press conference Thursday announcing the choice of Doral for the summit. He insisted his staff had concluded it was 'far and away the best physical facility.' Mulvaney said the White House reached that determination after visiting 10 sites across the country. In the same press conference, Mulvaney acknowledged a quid pro quo was at work when Trump held up U.S. aid to Ukraine in exchange for Ukraine's investigation of Democrats and the 2016 elections. Mulvaney later claimed his comments had been misconstrued, but not before drawing the ire of the president and frustration from other senior aides. Trump had been the first administration official to publicly float the selection of his property to host the summit when in August he mentioned it was on the short-list and praised its facilities and proximity to Miami's international airport. His comments, more than a month before the official announcement, drew instant criticism from good governance groups and Democrats, who said it raised concerns that Trump was using the White House to boost his personal finances The vociferous criticism did not die down, even as Trump insisted he would host the summit at cost, though he refused to disclose financial details. The annual heads-of-state gathering would at minimum have provided good-will value to his property. Noah Bookbinder, executive director of Citizens for Responsibility and Ethics in Washington, said Trump's reversal Saturday 'is a bow to reality, but does not change how astonishing it was that a president ever thought this was appropriate, or that it was something he could get away with.' An hour before Trump's announcement, Democratic presidential candidate Joe Biden condemned the selection of Doral for the summit. 'Hosting the G7 at Trump's hotel? A president should never be able to use the office for personal gain,' the former vice president said. On Thursday, Mulvaney had discounted Camp David, the government-owned presidential retreat, as the site for the summit, claiming, 'I understand the folks who participated in it hated it and thought it was a miserable place to have the G-7.' He added that it was too small and remote for the international summit. Mulvaney said then that unspecified sites in Hawaii and Utah had also been on the short list. It was unclear if they were still under consideration.
  • Australia's Qantas on Sunday completed the first non-stop commercial flight from New York to Sydney, which was used to run a series of tests to assess the effects of ultra long-haul flights on crew fatigue and passenger jetlag. The Boeing 787 Dreamliner touched down in Sydney early Sunday morning after a flight of 19 hours and 16 minutes — the world's longest. Qantas said tests ranged from monitoring pilot brain waves, melatonin levels and alertness to exercise classes for passengers. A total of 49 people were on board, in order to minimize weight and give the necessary fuel range. 'Overall, we're really happy with how the flight went and it's great to have some of the data we need to help assess turning this into a regular service,' said Capt. Sean Golding, who led the four pilots. The flight was part of Project Sunrise — Qantas' goal to operate regular, non-stop commercial flights from Australia's east coast cities of Brisbane, Sydney and Melbourne to London and New York. Two more research flights are planned as part of the project evaluations - London to Sydney in November and another New York to Sydney in December. 'We know ultra long-haul flights pose some extra challenges but that's been true every time technology has allowed us to fly farther. The research we're doing should give us better strategies for improving comfort and wellbeing along the way,' said Qantas Group CEO Alan Joyce. Night flights usually start with dinner and then lights off, but he said that for this flight, 'we started with lunch and kept the lights on for the first six hours, to match the time of day at our destination. It means you start reducing the jetlag straight away.' Professor Marie Carroll from the University of Sydney said she and fellow passengers did a lot of stretching and group exercises at prescribed intervals. 'We did the Macarena in the economy cabin,' she said.
  • Responding to stinging criticism, President Donald Trump on Saturday abruptly reversed his plan to hold the next Group of Seven world leaders' meeting at his Doral, Florida, golf resort next year. Trump announced a rare backtrack Saturday night after facing accusations that he was using the presidency to enrich himself by hosting the international summit at a private resort owned by his family. 'Based on both Media & Democrat Crazed and Irrational Hostility, we will no longer consider Trump National Doral, Miami, as the Host Site for the G-7 in 2020,' Trump tweeted. He said his administration 'will begin the search for another site, including the possibility of Camp David, immediately.' The striking reversal raises further doubts about the position of the president's acting chief of staff, Mick Mulvaney, who held a press conference Thursday announcing the choice of Doral for the summit. He insisted his staff had concluded it was 'far and away the best physical facility.' Mulvaney said the White House reached that determination after visiting 10 sites across the country. In the same press conference, Mulvaney acknowledged a quid pro quo was at work when Trump held up U.S. aid to Ukraine in exchange for Ukraine's investigation of Democrats and the 2016 elections. Mulvaney later claimed his comments had been misconstrued, but not before drawing the ire of the president and frustration from other senior aides. Trump had been the first administration official to publicly float the selection of his property to host the summit when in August he mentioned it was on the short-list and praised its facilities and proximity to Miami's international airport. His comments, more than a month before the official announcement, drew instant criticism from good governance groups and Democrats, who said it raised concerns that Trump was using the White House to boost his personal finances The vociferous criticism did not die down, even as Trump insisted he would host the summit at cost, though he refused to disclose financial details. The annual heads-of-state gathering would at minimum have provided good-will value to his property. Noah Bookbinder, executive director of Citizens for Responsibility and Ethics in Washington, said Trump's reversal Saturday 'is a bow to reality, but does not change how astonishing it was that a president ever thought this was appropriate, or that it was something he could get away with.' An hour before Trump's announcement, Democratic presidential candidate Joe Biden condemned the selection of Doral for the summit. 'Hosting the G7 at Trump's hotel? A president should never be able to use the office for personal gain,' the former vice president said. On Thursday, Mulvaney had discounted Camp David, the government-owned presidential retreat, as the site for the summit, claiming, 'I understand the folks who participated in it hated it and thought it was a miserable place to have the G-7.' He added that it was too small and remote for the international summit. Mulvaney said then that unspecified sites in Hawaii and Utah had also been on the short list. It was unclear if they were still under consideration.
  • Long after more flamboyant colleagues flamed out of President Donald Trump's favor amid ethics scandals, low-profile and folksy Rick Perry survived in the Cabinet in part by steering clear of controversy. Until now. The former Texas governor said Thursday he was quitting as energy secretary by year's end. The announcement came as the House impeachment investigation highlighted his work in Ukraine, where he promoted U.S. natural gas and where Trump hoped to find dirt on Democratic rival Joe Biden. Trump said that Perry, one of his longest serving Cabinet members, had planned for months to leave. But the timing of the announcement of Perry's departure fits a Trump pattern, said governance expert Kathryn Dunn Tenpas of the Brookings Institution. Her work shows there has been more turnover in Trump's Cabinet than under any president since at least Ronald Reagan. 'The more important the issue is to the president, the more likely you're on the chopping block,' Tenpas said. No evidence has emerged that Perry explicitly pressured Ukrainian officials to comply with Trump's push to investigate a Ukraine natural gas company where Biden's son Hunter was a board member. It's a central part of the impeachment investigation. Perry, an evangelical who takes part in weekly Cabinet Bible studies, told a Christian broadcast news outlet his month that, 'God as my witness,' he never heard any administration figure specifically mention either Biden in discussions about corruption investigations in Ukraine. Perry did publicly pressure Ukraine's president, Volodymyr Zelenskiy, for unspecified reforms 'in the energy sector,' however, including in comments at Zelenskiy's May inauguration. That was one of several Perry trips and meetings putting him in contact with Ukraine and U.S. figures playing pivotal roles in the actions now being studied by the House committees investigating impeachment. Perry also was present for at least part of a White House meeting in July with then-natural security adviser John Bolton and other U.S. and Ukrainian officials. Perry, at the time, tweeted out a photo of the group lined up in front of the White House and called it a 'productive discussion.' Trump is trying to block members of his administration from testifying before lawmakers who are investigating whether Trump used the powers of his office for personal political aims in Ukraine. The Energy Department on Friday refused to comply with a House subpoena for Perry. A top State Department official, George Kent, has testified that the White House deputized Perry, Ukraine envoy Kurt Volker and Trump's European Union ambassador, Gordon Sondland, to run U.S. policy in Ukraine. 'It's outrageous,' said Sen. Bob Menendez, D-N.J. Perry's public mission in Ukraine was in line with U.S. and European policy in place before the Trump administration: 'flood' Europe with imported natural gas, as Perry said in a video in 2015, even before Trump won office. The policy is designed to help Ukraine and other Eastern European countries escape the political dominance that Russia's control of the region's energy supply has helped give Moscow. Perry's Texas roots gave him ties with the oil and gas companies exporting to Europe. But there are no allegations that Perry improperly arranged natural gas deals to benefit oil friends. Corruption in Ukraine can make doing business there dodgy, and Ukraine lacks the giant natural gas terminals and other facilities to import much natural gas shipments directly, energy experts say. That's made it less of a targeted customer for Western natural gas sales than, for example, Poland. Poland has done much better economically than Ukraine since the breakup of the Soviet Union, enabling Polish leaders to win favor with Trump by buying U.S. warplanes and natural gas. Perry has acknowledged that he consulted on Ukraine matters with Trump's personal lawyer, Rudy Giuliani. Giuliani served as one of Trump's main, back channel movers in the administration's 2020-related political efforts in Ukraine, in talks bypassing official U.S. government channels. The U.S. has indicted associates of Giuliani on allegations they illegally tried to funnel cash to Republican politicians, using a natural gas company as a front. It's part of the tangle of business and political administration efforts in Ukraine that impeachment investigators are trying to unravel. The world Perry moves in as he promotes U.S. natural gas is rife with fringe characters, says Edward Chow, an expert in Eastern European and international energy at the Center for Strategic and International Studies, a think tank. 'There's always these middlemen. Usually they present themselves as having some kind of political connections. Ninety-nine percent of these middlemen never score a deal,' Chow said. 'They talk about billion-dollar deals, and it's like, 'Yeah? What's your bank number?'' Publicly, Perry moved through that world as a champion of U.S. energy and energy policy, advocating for American oil and gas and coal, a Trump priority, but also encouraging countries to build up solar, wind and nuclear power. James Melville Jr., U.S. ambassador to Estonia until he resigned last year in protest of Trump's treatment of European allies, said he was 'positively impressed' by Perry, in some ways, in their one encounter at an event on Baltic states. Perry 'was friendly, he was cordial, he was talkative,' and willing to meet Estonian officials that Melville brought over to introduce. 'He struck me very much as a politician,' Melville said. 'Broad knowledge but not very deep' when it came to science-heavy matters under Perry's stewardship as energy secretary. Before now, Perry's defining national moment came as a presidential candidate, when he forgot the name of the Energy Department in a 2011 debate as he was listing Cabinet agencies he wanted to eliminate. As energy secretary, by most accounts he has been an active and eager leader, visiting the country's research labs and touring power plants. He worked well with lawmakers, in a job that required him to appeal annually to Congress for money for projects despite Trump's own call for cuts. 'The coolest job I've ever had,' he said in his departure video Thursday. Perry stayed low-key with policy aims that ran counter to the president's likes, tamping down public shows of support for the wind turbines he had promoted as Texas governor, for example. 'The secretary knows he works for the president ... and a large part of his job is enhancing and defending his administration's and the president's policy goals. And he has done that,' noted Ray Sullivan, Perry's former chief of staff in Texas.
  • They call it the Cosmic Crisp. It's not a video game, a superhero or the title of a Grateful Dead song. It's a new variety of apple, coming to a grocery store near you Dec. 1 Cosmic Crisp is the first apple ever bred in Washington state, which grows the majority of the United States' apples. It's expected to be a game changer. Already, growers have planted 12 million Cosmic Crisp apple trees, a sign of confidence in the new variety. While only 450,000 40-pound (18-kilogram) boxes will be available for sale this year, that will jump to more than 2 million boxes in 2020 and more than 21 million by 2026. The apple variety was developed by Washington State University. Washington growers, who paid for the research, will have the exclusive right to sell it for the first 10 years. The apple is called Cosmic Crisp because of the bright yellowish dots on its skin, which look like distant stars. 'I've never seen an apple prettier in the orchard than these things are,' said Aaron Clark of Yakima, whose family owns several orchards in central Washington and has planted 80 acres of Cosmic Crisps. The new variety keeps for a long time in storage and in the refrigerator, said Kate Evans, who runs the breeding program at Washington State University. And it's an exceptionally good 'eating apple,' she said. 'It's ultra-crisp, very juicy and has a good balance of sweetness and tartness.' Cosmic Crisps are a cross between the disease-resistant Enterprise and the popular, crunchy Honeycrisp varieties. The Honeycrisp, nicknamed 'Moneycrisp' by some growers, was the latest apple to spark a big buzz in the United States when it was introduced a couple of decades ago. It was developed by the University of Minnesota. 'This apple (Cosmic Crisp) has a good opportunity to be a hit with a lot of people,' said Clark, a vice president of Price Cold Storage, a company with orchards and fruit warehouses throughout central Washington. 'It better be, because we are going to have a lot of them.' Apples are a $2.5 billion a year business in Washington, which grows about 60% of the nation's supply, or nearly 140 million boxes. The top varieties are Gala (23, Red Delicious (20%) and Fuji (13%). Apples are grown in the arid valleys and brown hillsides of central Washington, a few hours east of Seattle, and watered by irrigation projects. The state has around 1,500 apple growers and 175,000 acres of orchards. About 50,000 people pick some 12 billion apples by hand each fall. The fruit is exported to 60 countries. With so much success, why was a new apple variety needed? 'A new apple brings excitement,' said Toni Lynn Adams, spokeswoman for the Washington Apple Commission, which markets apples internationally. 'A new variety can reinvigorate a market and industry.' Washington growers, who had watched the market share for sometimes mushy Red Delicious apples plummet over time, were looking to replicate the success of the Honeycrisp, Adams said. 'It's going to shake things up in a great way,' Adams said. 'We're expecting it to increase in volume rapidly.' Adams could not speculate on how much Cosmic Crisp apples will cost per pound. 'Better quality makes for better returns,' said Clark, the grower. 'This is a for-profit deal, man. We're trying to make some money with it.' Remarkably, this is the first apple variety developed in Washington state, which has been known for apples for more than a century. Scientists at WSU's Tree Fruit Research Center in Wenatchee spent 20 years breeding the desired apple tree seeds. In addition to helping pay for that research, apple growers need a license to buy the trees and pay a royalty on sales of the fruit. The trees take three years to produce a crop, said Kathryn Grandy, a member of the team marketing the apple. 'This will be the largest launch of a single variety ever, globally,' she said, and it's backed by a $10.5 million marketing budget. Consumers will not have trouble finding the variety, said Grandy, who works for a company called Proprietary Variety Management and is based in the town of Chelan, in the heart of apple country. Work on developing the variety began in 1997, said Evans, of Washington State University. The process of cross-hybridization has been used to breed plants for hundreds of years, Evans said, and is quite different from the more controversial genetic modification methods. 'The goal, in my opinion, is to get more consumers eating apples,' she said. 'Ultimately that is the goal of any plant breeder.
  • Chicago parents leaned on family, friends and community groups as 25,000 teachers in the nation's third-largest school district went on strike this past week, canceling classes for more than 300,000 kids. For some families, the Chicago Teachers Union walkout meant a day off and a bit of inconvenience for parents juggling work schedules. For the city's most vulnerable families, though, the strike triggered a hasty search for a solution to help kids and let their parents make it to work. Both Mayor Lori Lightfoot and union leaders said negotiators have several major disputes to resolve, including pay and benefits, class size, and school staffing. Classes were canceled Thursday and Friday, and it is not clear when the first major walkout since 2012 by the city's teachers will end. The two sides were meeting Saturday. The uncertainty of her five kids being out of school has weighed on Antenisha Dale. When she walked into a Salvation Army community center on the city's West Side Friday morning, Dale's eyes widened when she learned they could all stay for the day, for no charge. The 29-year-old took off from her job at a grocery store deli counter on Thursday, forgoing a day's pay when every dollar is essential for her family. Finding an affordable place for her kids to go if a strike drags on 'takes a weight off my shoulders,' Dale said. Striking teachers argue that students and families in similar situations are the motivation behind their 'social justice' agenda, not their own pay or benefits. They're demanding smaller class sizes and more resources for schools, including nurses and social workers, written into the contract along with ways to enforce those changes. 'What we really want is an improvement in our working conditions, which are the learning conditions for our students,' CTU President Jesse Sharkey said Friday. City and district officials, though, have called their offer of a 16% salary increase over five years for teachers 'historic.' Meeting all of teachers' demands including a 5% salary increase for three years would cost more than $2.5 billion each year, an amount the district cannot afford, Mayor Lori Lightfoot has said. 'CPS is not flush with cash,' Lightfoot said Friday, noting the district's reliance on loans in its latest budget plan. Chicago Public Schools' buildings remained open on regular schedules, staffed by principals and non-union employees and prepared to provide students with breakfast and lunch. But the schools staffed by makeshift crews didn't seem popular with parents. The district reported about 7,500 students showed up on the strike's first day. On the city's North Side on Friday, a few parents opted to bring their kids to a neighborhood YMCA rather than nearby schools. Samantha Gutierrez said her daughter preferred the YMCA where she goes regularly in contrast to the school now staffed by people she doesn't know well. 'I didn't feel comfortable sending her to a building full of strangers,' said Gutierrez, 25, an orthodontist assistant. 'And I think she would feel a little intimidated there. She said she wanted to go to the Y where she knows kids.' Ira Cox worked out at the YMCA Friday morning before heading home to spend the day with his 7-year-old girl and 9-year-old boy. Cox said he sent his children to their school on Thursday while he worked but said it felt like 'crossing a picket line.' He arranged to work from home on Friday. 'I know I have options some people don't have and I am not criticizing anybody,' Cox said. 'But I can do this, so I am doing it in solidarity with the striking teachers.' Parents whose jobs have inflexible scheduling and keep them on tight budgets that won't cover admission prices for a variety of 'strike camps' planned around the city were forced to find alternate plans. While some relied on family members, others turned to the city's churches and nonprofit groups for help. Courtney Holmon, senior program director at The Ark of St. Sabina, said she thinks parents took kids to work or stayed home during the first few days of the strike. But if it continues, expects more families on the South Side to need The Ark's free program. 'We have people that are bringing four kids in one family,' Holmon said. 'They can't afford four times $65.' Jalisa McKissick brought her 9-year-old daughter and 5-year-old son to a Salvation Army center on Friday morning before heading to work at a downtown department store. McKissick said she took Thursday off but couldn't afford to give up another day of pay as a single mom. McKissick, 27, said she's frustrated by teachers' decision to strike just as her kids were settling into their classes and worries that they will have little time to get back on track before classes let out again for holidays. 'These children should not be going through this,' she said. 'I think they're being inconsiderate and insensitive.' ___ Associated Press video producer Noreen Nasir contributed to this report.
  • One of the longest proposed new natural gas pipelines in the U.S. is set to run through Heath Frantzen's property in the Texas Hill Country, where more than 600 white-tailed and trophy axis deer graze on a hunting ranch his family has owned for three generations. Fearing financial ruin and conservation risks, Frantzen and dozens of other landowners in central Texas have banded together with environmental groups and conservative-leaning city governments in opposing the route of pipeline giant Kinder Morgan's 430-mile (690-kilometer), $2 billion natural gas expressway. 'We know a lot more today about the aquifers, we know a lot more today about the endangered species, we know a lot more today about the sensitivity of the environment,' Frantzen said. 'And putting a pipeline project through an area such as this, especially when you can compare it to some of the other places where they could put it even less expensively and with much greater ease — this is an idiotic idea.' But Kinder Morgan has defended its proposal, stating it's looking to ease a pipeline shortage and help drillers transport gas trapped in West Texas' thriving Permian Basin to refineries on the Gulf Coast. Now, the company is exercising eminent domain as a nasty legal battle over the path of the pipeline threatens to jeopardize future projects passing through central Texas. Opponents of the route are also challenging state regulators at the Texas Railroad Commission who gave Kinder Morgan the green light while accepting millions of dollars from the oil and gas industry. Unlike the Dakota Access Pipeline project that sparked massive protests in 2016 and 2017 over fears it would hurt the environment and sacred Native American sites, opposition to the Texas pipeline has largely played out of public view. Kinder Morgan's pipeline project comes as an unprecedented boom in oil and natural gas production in the Permian Basin has catapulted the nation to the forefront of the global shale market. Last year, the U.S. surpassed Russia and Saudi Arabia to become the world's largest crude oil producer, according to an assessment by the U.S. Energy Information Administration. Natural gas is a byproduct of oil drilling, and without the proper infrastructure to move it from the Permian Basin, companies end up burning off excess through a process known as flaring, Kinder Morgan spokesman Allen Fore said. 'That's the purpose of this project, to capture that natural gas and ship it to market,' Fore said. If completed, the pipeline will deliver up to 2 billion cubic feet (56.6 million cubic meters) of natural gas — enough to fuel 31,500 homes for one day —as it passes through 16 Texas counties. Texas already has the most expansive pipeline network in the country with more than 460,000 miles (740,250 kilometers) of channels zigzagging through it. But the project is at the center of a fight that has grounded an unlikely alliance assembled across the state's central region, where momentum has grown in calling for the company to reroute the pipeline and in urging for further industry regulation in oil-friendly Texas. Those strange bedfellows have held townhalls, formed grassroots community campaigns, and lodged lawsuits against Kinder Morgan. Opponents of the route have pointed to the potential contamination of the region's porous Edwards Aquifer, the impact it would have on an environmentally sensitive area, and the lack of public engagement and oversight in the routing process. Kinder Morgan has repeatedly stated the pipeline won't pose any safety threat. There is also concern that Kinder Morgan's success would set a precedent for other companies interested in building conduits through Hill Country, said Chuck Lesniak, who serves on an advisory committee for the U.S. Department of Transportation's Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration. 'I do know that the industry is paying attention to this project, and the legal issues, because from a legal standpoint, if this goes south on Kinder Morgan, it has enormous impacts on other pipeline projects proposed for Texas,' Lesniak said. A judge has ruled in favor of the Houston-based company in one legal challenge attempting to block the project on grounds that the Texas Railroad Commission doesn't provide enough state oversight or regulation; that decision is being appealed. Fore said the company has made 150 routing adjustments and is not considering changing the pipeline's set path. The company has started preliminary work, including marking the construction space and leveling the land, but no pipeline has been laid in the ground. Clashes between rural landowners and companies seeking to seize property are not uncommon in Texas, where an estimated 95% of the land is privately owned. Although landowners are compensated for pipeline operators' use of easements, they often argue the money provided isn't enough. Unlike the Texas Public Utility Commission rules that electric, telephone and water utilities must follow, oil and gas companies do not need to seek the approval of the Texas Railroad Commission or affected municipalities for their proposed route. They also have no formal public process to hear from affected landowners. The commission has said it does not approve of whether a pipeline is necessary. 'We approve of whether they have met certain requirements and given us information that we need so we know this is a pipeline ... about to be constructed so we can go out and inspect and put it on our inspection schedule,' said Railroad Commission spokeswoman Ramona Nye. Texas' lack of oversight on the pipeline industry allows companies to make unilateral determinations about the best route, said Luke Ellis, an attorney representing roughly 40 landowners, including Frantzen, in their disputes with Kinder Morgan. For Frantzen, it could be the end to his way of life at his 260-acre (105-hectare) ranch. He called it a sentimental moment when he picked up an array of deer antler sheds littering his ranch one day this summer. 'No one has fought (Kinder Morgan) harder and no one has fought them longer than we have in the Hill Country,' he said. ___ Follow Clarice Silber on Twitter: https://twitter.com/ClariceSilber
  • The Latest on Brexit (all times local): 6:25 p.m. France's presidential Elysee Palace says there's nothing to be gained by prolonging a decision on the Brexit accord. The Elysee says that 'a supplementary delay is in the interest of no one.' The remarks came after British lawmakers voted to delay their decision on the deal for the U.K.'s exit from the European Union, currently scheduled for Oct. 31. Prime Minister Boris Johnson is now required to ask the EU to delay Britain's departure. French President Emmanuel Macron's office says that given that a deal was negotiated, 'it's now up to the British Parliament to say if it approves or rejects it. There must be a vote on the fundamentals.' ___ 4:20 p.m. The European Parliament's chief Brexit official says expert legislators will assess the House of Commons vote Monday in the knowledge that any European Union legislative approval before the Oct. 31 deadline is extremely tight. Guy Verhofstadt said the legislature's Brexit Steering Group meets on Monday as planned. Earlier he said the British approval process needed to be completed before the EU parliament would fully vote on it. With time tight before Thursday's last slated session of the EU parliament, a technical extension of the Oct. 31 date likely would be needed. The next EU plenary beyond next week would be Nov. 13, necessitating at least a two-week extension for the EU final approval. ___ 4:15 p.m. The British government looks set to try again next week to get Parliament to back its divorce deal with the European Union, after lawmakers voted to delay the decision. Leader of the House of Commons Jacob Rees-Mogg says the government will seek a debate Monday on its Brexit-implementing legislation that would effectively be a vote to approve the deal. It's unclear whether that would be allowed under House of Commons rules against holding repeated votes on the same question. House of Commons Speaker John Bercow said he would make a ruling Monday. Lawmakers voted Saturday to withhold their approval for the Brexit deal until all legislation to implement it has been passed. In the meantime, Prime Minister Boris Johnson is required to ask the EU to delay Britain's departure, currently scheduled for Oct. 31. Johnson is still aiming to get the deal approved by Oct. 31 so no delay is necessary. ___ 3:50 p.m. Polish Prime Minister Mateusz Morawiecki says his country does not see Saturday's vote by British lawmakers as a rejection of the Brexit deal but rather as a delay. Morawiecki said in a Twitter message immediately after the vote that Poland 'will support a positive approach on EU level to @BorisJohnson government proposal.' He added that, for the 27 EU leaders 'Avoiding chaotic, no-deal #brexit should be our top priority.' The EU leaders will have to decide on any extension to the Oct. 31 deadline. ___ 3:30 p.m. The European Union says it is up to the U.K. government to tell the 27 EU member states 'as soon as possible' what action it will take after the Brexit deal was not voted on Saturday. EU Commission spokeswoman Mina Andreeva said the EU executive took note of the vote and did not suggest a course of action. 'It will be for the UK government to inform us about the next steps as soon as possible,' she said on Twitter. Had the deal been approved, the EU parliament had planned to back the Brexit deal by Thursday evening. ___ 3 p.m. British Prime Minister Boris Johnson says he will push ahead and try to leave European Union by Oct. 31. He said Saturday he is not daunted or dismayed by a vote delaying approval of the new Brexit deal, and said there will be no new negotiations with the EU. He says he still believes he can command 'overwhelming' support for the new Brexit divorce plan and will introduce the required legislation to make that happen. Johnson says he is not compelled by the law to negotiate any further with the EU. ___ 2:45 p.m. British lawmakers have voted to postpone a decision on whether to back a Brexit deal with the European Union, throwing a wrench into government plans to leave the bloc at the end of this month. At a special session of Parliament intended to ratify the deal, lawmakers instead voted 322-306 to withhold their approval until legislation to implement the agreement has been passed. The vote is a major blow to Prime Minister Boris Johnson and means he has to ask the EU to delay Britain's departure. Parliament previously passed a law compelling him to do that if a deal had not been passed by Saturday. The move is intended to ensure the U.K. can't crash out of the EU without a deal on the scheduled Oct. 31 departure date. The government still hopes it can pass the needed legislation by the end of the month so the U.K. can leave on time. ___ 1:40 p.m. Former Prime Minister Theresa May, whose Brexit deal was rejected by Parliament three times, says she is backing the agreement struck by her successor Boris Johnson. May told lawmakers she had a 'distinct sense of deja vu' as Parliament debated whether to back Johnson's EU divorce deal. She resigned in frustration after lawmakers repeatedly threw out her Brexit agreement. Johnson's deal is similar to May's in some ways but contains a different arrangement for maintaining an open Irish border. May said Parliament should pass the deal and let Britain leave the EU on Oct. 31. She said 'people want certainty in their lives. . If you want this country to move forward then vote for the deal today.' ___ 12:30 p.m. Tens of thousands of anti-Brexit protesters are marching through London as lawmakers debate Prime Minister Boris Johnson's new European Union divorce deal. Protesters, many wearing blue berets emblazoned with yellow stars symbolizing the EU flag, poured out of subway trains and buses for the march to Parliament Square on Saturday. In one side street, a group of demonstrators with bells strapped to their legs and wielding sticks performed a traditional English morris dance and chanted: 'Morris, not Boris!' to cheers from onlookers. One of the dancers, Kate Fisher, says 'demos that are fun and joyful are more effective.' Elsewhere, the mood was less cheerful. Sarah Spoor, who cares for her two children with disabilities, choked back tears as she said she is 'distraught' at the prospect of Britain leaving the EU. ___ 11:50 a.m. Thousands of Brexit opponents are gathering in central London to call for Britain to remain part of the European Union. The crowds are planning to converge on Parliament Square as legislators are voting on Brexit departure plans put forth by Conservative British Prime Minister Boris Johnson. Many carried signs calling for a halt to the Brexit process that started with a 2016 referendum in which British voters narrowly backed taking Britain out of the 28-nation bloc. Protester Bruce Nicole, a vicar from Camberley southwest of London, said the Brexit deal would harm Britain. He says 'I fervently believe that we should remain in the EU.' He adds 'I am British but I am also European. I don't believe the current deal offers any benefits at all.' ___ 10 a.m. Opposition leader Jeremy Corbyn has told Parliament that the Brexit deal on which lawmakers are voting risks jobs, rights, the environment and the health service. The Labour Party leader told Parliament Saturday that Prime Minister Boris Johnson's new deal is substantially worse than the one it replaces, which was voted down three times. Corbyn says it removes protection for workers' rights and the environment and replaces them with empty promises. He says it would also reduce Britain's commitment to fighting climate change. He also warns it would hurt British manufacturing. ___ 9:50 a.m. British Prime Minister Boris Johnson has told Parliament that his new Brexit deal can heal the rift in British politics and unite warring factions. He used a rare Saturday session to plead with lawmakers to back the new plan. He says it would 'take back control' of Britain's borders, fishing and trade and preserve the gains of the Good Friday agreement that helped end violence in Northern Ireland. Johnson faces a close vote on his plan with opposition parties determined to block it. ___ 9:40 a.m. Prime Minister Boris Johnson's plan to get Parliament to approve his Brexit deal with the European Union has been thrown into doubt. Lawmakers will first vote on whether to withhold approval until legislation to implement the agreement has been passed. That would bring another law into play that would force Johnson to seek a Brexit delay from the European Union. House of Commons Speaker John Bercow said would allow a vote on an amendment that essentially puts the vote on the deal off until another day. Those behind the amendment say it will remove the risk that the U.K. could stumble out of the bloc without a deal on Oct. 31 because the law is not in place. The vote is due later Saturday. ___ 8:40 a.m. Prime Minister Boris Johnson's Brexit plan faces what is expected to be an extremely tight vote as Britain's Parliament prepares for its first Saturday session since the 1982 Falklands war. At stake is a new divorce plan agreed between the British government and the other 27 European Union nations at a summit Thursday. Johnson hopes for success in getting a fractious Parliament to back the deal after his predecessor, Theresa May, failed three times to get lawmakers behind her plan. Johnson does not have a parliamentary majority but he is hoping to woo some opposition Labour Party lawmakers to his side. He said in The Sun newspaper on Saturday that a vote for the plan would bring a 'painful chapter in our history' to an end.
  • Global finance officials wrapped up their fall meetings on Saturday with a pledge to 'employ all appropriate tools' to combat the weakest global growth in a decade, but there was little evidence of progress in easing trade tensions, a major source of the slowdown. The policy-setting committee for the 189-nation International Monetary Fund said in a closing statement that growth should accelerate next year. Officials acknowledged that a range of factors could undermine that forecast, including continued trade fights and increased geopolitical risks. 'We recognize the need to resolve trade tensions and support the necessary reform of the World Trade Organization,' the statement said. It did not detail ways to accomplish that. There was also no sign that discussions on the sidelines of the meetings had produced any breakthrough in the trade disputes initiated by President Donald Trump as part of his get-tough approach to stronger enforcement of U.S. trade laws to lower America's huge trade deficits. Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin, in remarks to the IMF committee, said the administration's goal was to prepare 'a foundation for future growth through fairer trade deals.' Mnuchin said negotiations last week between the United States and China, the world's two biggest economies, had achieved 'substantial progress' on phase one of a trade deal to resolve the U.S. claims that China is stealing intellectual property. While Trump suspended a tariff increase on $250 billion of Chinese products that had been scheduled to take effect this past week, few specifics about that agreement have come out. U.S. officials said negotiations to wrap up those details are underway. The IMF managing director, Kristalina Georgieva, said the threat from trade wars was a chief point of discussion for finance officials. She said the IMF has estimated that the tariffs already imposed or threatened could shave 0.8% off global growth by the end of next year. Much of that stems from the fallout on business confidence. In trade wars, 'everybody loses,' she said. 'Policymakers ought to take very seriously their obligations to international cooperation in trade.' The World Bank's president, David Malpass, said this week's finance discussions had focused on how to address multiple challenges. 'Growth is slowing, investment is sluggish, manufacturing activity is soft and trade is weakening,' he said. 'Climate change and fragility are making poor countries more vulnerable.' He said the World Bank was committed to helping to address these challenges to provide a better life for the 700 million people in the world living in extreme poverty. The IMF, in an updated economic outlook, projected the global economy would expand by 3% this year, the weakest in a decade, and said 90 percent of the world was experiencing a downshift in growth. But the IMF forecast growth will accelerate slightly to 3.4% in 2020, still below the 3.6% rate in 2018. Jubilee USA, a religious organization fighting global poverty, said in a statement that while the IMF outlined a number of serious threats, the recommendations for dealing with them fell short. 'Risky investing, trade tensions and developing countries borrowing too much are serious concerns for financial stability,' said Eric LeCompte, the group's executive director. While Trump's trade policies were a prime topic of discussion at the meetings, finance officials for the most part avoided direct criticism of the American president. Christine Lagarde, who dealt with the Trump administration during her last three years as head of the IMF, was a bit more direct in an interview to be broadcast Sunday on CBS's '60 Minutes.' Asked about Trump's trade war with China, she said it would give the world's economy 'a big haircut' and should be resolved by having all parties 'sit down like big men, many men in those rooms and put everything on the table, and try to deal bit by bit, piece by piece, so that we have certainty.' On Trump's frequent Twitter attacks on Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell, Lagarde said central bankers need to be independent to do their jobs well. 'Market stability should not be the subject of a tweet here or a tweet there. It requires consideration, thinking, quiet and measured and rational decisions,' she said. Lagarde is scheduled to take over on Nov. 1 as the head of the European Central Bank, which manages monetary policy for the 19 countries who use the euro currency.

Local News

  • ATHENS Georgia put the game on D'Andre Swift's shoulders Saturday night, and the junior tailback delivered. The No. 10-ranked Bulldogs beat Kentucky 21-0 thanks to Swift's hard-charging ways. The junior from Philadelphia carried 21 times for 179 yards and 2 touchdowns. Swift had strong comments about the Bulldogs' offense earlier in the week. Swift felt more passes downfield should be called in the wake of last week's 20-17 overtime loss to South Carolina. 'They put a lot of people in the box so it's hard,' Swift said. 'Once you get past one level, there are three guys right there.' That was once again the case on Saturday night. But Swift found a way to break tackles and make Kentucky defenders miss with 6:20 left in the game. The Bulldogs had taken over a the Wildcats' 39 after a 15-yard punt, their first possession in Kentucky's territory in the game. Swift took the handoff and broke right, making two Wildcats' defenders miss at the line before outracing the reminder of the Kentucky defense to the end zone to break a scoreless tie. Swifted added a 3-yard TD run with 6:24 left to make it 21-0, capping a 13-play, 92-yard drive to essentially put the game on ice. Georgia has a bye next Saturday and will return to action at 3:30 p.m. on Nov. 2 in Jacksonville, Fla., against Florida. The post Georgia football game ball: D'Andre Swift carries Bulldogs to 21-0 win appeared first on DawgNation.
  • On Friday afternoon a train collided with a tractor-trailer in Winder at the May Street and Broad Street intersection. The Winder Police Department is asking that motorists avoid the area as they work to clear the roadway.
  • A Hartwell man faces vehicular homicide charges after slamming head-on into a car driven by a University of Georgia student and then leaving the scene, Athens police said. The student, identified as 20-year-old junior Drury Anderson Shierling, was killed about 6 a.m. Wednesday on Timothy Road when the other driver took a curve too fast and crossed into his lane, according to a crash report. The driver who caused the wreck, identified by police as 51-year-old Edward Lee Stowers, was traveling north from the Inner Loop to Timothy Road when his rented 2018 Ford Fusion crossed the raised median and entered the southbound lanes, authorities said. After striking the UGA student, Stowers allegedly got out of his vehicle, flagged down another driver and asked for a ride to a nearby gas station, according to the report. He was arrested after the witness called 911 and told police where he was. Shierling, who was from Leesburg, studied business and real estate, a university spokeswoman said.  Another passenger in the students car was injured in the wreck and taken to a hospital, the Athens Banner-Herald reported.  Stowers is charged with vehicular homicide, hit-and-run resulting in death, traveling too fast for conditions, failure to maintain lane and driving with a suspended license. He remains held without bond at the Athens-Clarke County jail, records show.  In other news: 
  • The Athens-Clarke County Democratic Committee is proud to announce Dinner & Conversation with the U.S. Senate Candidates to be held on Veteran’s Day, Monday, November 11, at the Cotton Press in Athens, Georgia. On the cusp of one of the most important election-cycles in Georgia history, attendees will get the unique opportunity to hear from Sarah Riggs Amico, Jon Ossoff, Mayor Ted Terry, and Mayor Teresa Tomlinson about their vision for Georgia and the United States.   Dinner & Conversation with the U.S. Senate Candidates will begin at 6:15pm (doors at 5:45pm) on Monday, November 11 at the Cotton Press. Attendees will be treated to a delicious family-style dinner as they hear conversations between candidates and our special guests. After hearing from all 4 candidates and finishing apple pie for dessert, attendees will be invited to mingle with the candidates and continue the conversations in a less formal way at our meet-and-greet.   “This is the first, and possibly only, time that Athenians and the people of northeast Georgia will be able to see all of the Senatorial candidates in one location,'' says Denise Ricks, Chair of the Athens-Clarke County Democratic Committee. “It is an opportunity to witness a one on one, in depth conversation with each candidate and have them answer submitted questions. We know voters want to hear where the candidates stand on healthcare, foreign policy, education, and the environment. This is your chance to hear about those issues and to get answers to your questions!”   The 2020 elections will decide the Presidency, not one but both U.S. Senate seats for Georgia, along with every Georgia Congressional, State House, and State Senate seat.    'Make no mistake, the stakes of the 2020 elections are enormous” says Georgia State Representative and Democratic Caucus Leader Bob Trammell. “ Elections have consequences, and the election before redistricting has consequences for the next decade. We can not afford for anyone to sit out democracy in 2020. All hands on deck.' 
  • Hall County state Senator Butch Miller says he is looking at legislation that would protect students from sexual assaults at the hands of teachers. The Republican from Gainesville is pitching a bill he says would clarify existing law on cases in which students are victimized by teachers, coaches, and principals at schools in Georgia.  The next session of the Georgia Legislature begins in January.    From the Ga Senate press office… Senate President Pro Tempore Butch Miller (R – Gainesville) recently announced legislation aimed at further protecting students from sexual assault by those entrusted with their care. “When legislation we pass doesn’t go far enough to protect our most vulnerable citizens like students in our schools, we must address necessary changes as soon as possible,” said Sen. Miller. “This legislation will fix an oversight in our existing law and will add necessary protections for victims of sexual assault by ensuring their perpetrators can be brought to justice. I hope we can get this legislation passed and to the Governor’s desk as soon as possible during the 2020 Legislative Session.”  Under the current Georgia Code definition for improper sexual contact by employee or agent, sexual assault of a student occurs when the victim is “enrolled as a student at the school.” This specific language was used by the Northeastern Judicial Circuit to send back a case to the state court regarding a coach who was charged with felony sexual assault. According to the decision by the circuit, the felony sexual assault charge did not apply since the accused coach “was not a teacher at the school where the student attended.”  The legislation announced by Sen. Miller will address this issue by revising Georgia code and adding “within the school district” to the existing “enrolled as a student at the school” language. School district will be defined as “any area, county, independent, or local school district.” 

Bulldog News

  • ATHENS Georgia offensive coordinator James Coley walked out of the coaches' box after Saturday night's 21-0 win over Kentucky wearing a big smile. No one would have guessed the Bulldogs gained a season-low 270 yards of offense or that his quarterback had a career-low 35 yards passing and failed to throw a TD pass for just the second time in his career. Georgia's head coach, Kirby Smart, was pleased with the play calling and the hard-fought win over the Wildcats, so Coley's mission was accomplished. But many fans at Sanford Stadium booed the No. 10-ranked home team during the game, however, frustrated with what appeared to be very conservative play calling amid the heavy rain and wind. 'I'm not a fan, it's probably frustrating for the fans, but as a team we win however we can find a way to win, that's all we did today, we found a way to win,' Swift said. 'If they boo us, they boo us. I'm fine. As long as we're winning the games.' Some Georgia football followers on social media channels have been imploring reporters to ask Smart about play-calling and his offensive coordinator, James Coley. Smart was indeed asked on Saturday night to assess Coley, who was promoted to offensive coordinator and play caller after serving as the co-offensive coordinator and quarterbacks coach last season. ' Very pleased today, I thought we were extremely patient on offense and in tough conditions,' Smart said. 'And, we've got more explosive plays than we did last year at this time, with three wide receivers that are in the NFL.' Smart said he didn't think it very rationale for anyone to try to assess the Georgia offense on a night where the weather conditions played such a large role. 'If you go out there and evaluate that, and you give judgement based on that, you're a lot smarter than me,' Smart said. 'There's not a lot you can do in those conditions.' As for the booing, Smart said he could't hear it because he had headphones on. 'We're trying to make the best decisions that gives us the best chance,' Smart said. 'I mean, you know, fans, that's what they pay their money for, to give their opinions and they are entitled to that. I respect that. 'But at the end of the day our job is to put our kids in the most successful situations and allow them to be successful, you know what I mean? I don't think you make decisions based on that (crowd reaction).' The Bulldogs, two-time defending SEC East Division champs, have a bye next weekend before returning to action on Nov. 2 against Florida in Jacksonville. Georgia-Kentucky stories Georgia football stock report, lock-down defense gets shutout D'Andre Swift gets game ball, carries Bulldogs to victory Georgia game recap, how the Bulldogs beat Kentucky WATCH: Kirby Smart proud Bulldogs able to chop wood' The post Georgia's Kirby Smart very pleased' with OC James Coley, addresses home fans booing appeared first on DawgNation.
  • ATHENS Georgia coach Kirby Smart gets paid to win games and compete for championships, so there wasn't a lot of second-guessing after a 21-0 win over Kentucky. Smart has never been too concerned with style points, and especially not on a night of torrential rain and wind gusting up to 20 mph during the No. 10-ranked Bulldogs (6-1, 3-1 SEC) win over the Wildcats (3-4, 1-4) at Sanford Stadium. Still, there were some scattered boos. Smart shrugged it off after the game, saying fans pay for their right to share their opinions, and it didn't affect him because he had headphones on, anyway. ' I could have told you two days ago we weren't going to go out there and throw it for 200 yards in those conditions,' Smart said. 'We had to put a plan together to give us the best chance to be successful. I thought we did a good job.' Georgia out-gained Kentucky 270 yards to 177 in a game where both teams' pass game was pretty much non-existent. Jake Fromm was 9-of-12 passing for 35 yards considerably better than the 2-of-16 passing, 17-yard output Eddie Gran's Kentucky offense mustered. Fromm attempted only one pass in the second half, a 7-yard completion, as the Bulldogs run game took its toll. D'Andre Swift's 39-yard TD run with 6:20 left in the third quarter broke open what had been a scoreless tie. The Georgia defense seemed to feed off the energy. Safety J.R. Reed delivered a fumble-inducing hit on UK quarterback Lynn Bowden on the Wildcats' ensuing drive, Richard LeCounte recovering the ball on the Kentucky 31, Five consecutive run plays later, Brian Herrien sped around right end for an 8-yard TD that made it 14-0 with 1:43 left in the third quarter. 'I think that's a wear and tear effect,' Smart said, reflecting on how the Bulldogs run game took over the second half. 'You're not just going to walk out there in those conditions and just walk down the field and score on people that's tough. It's tough to get traction.' The Georgia defense dug in one final time in the fourth quarter, stemming a Kentucky drive that reached the UGA 8-yard line when linebacker Jermaine Johnson flushed Bowden out of the pocket and forced an incompletion. The Bulldogs' offense slammed the door shut after the change of possessions, marching 92 yards on 13 plays for the final score of the night, Swift crashing in from 3 yards out with 6:24 remaining. ' I told the team we had to be patient and continue to chop wood throughout the game,' Smart said. 'It was going to be a field-position battle the whole game. I was proud of the way our guys fought in what was a tough environment to play in. 'I told the team if they handled it best, they would probably come out on top.' Georgia coach Kirby Smart Georgia-Kentucky stories Georgia football stock report, lock-down defense gets shutout D'Andre Swift gets game ball, carries Bulldogs to victory Georgia game recap, how the Bulldogs beat Kentucky The post WATCH: Kirby Smart proud Bulldogs able to chop wood' in win over Kentucky appeared first on DawgNation.
  • ATHENS Rain poured down and a harsh wind blew through Sanford Stadium, gusts over 20 mph at times. Georgia and Kentucky offensive play callers responded accordingly. A slugfest ensured, the Bulldogs finally overpowering the Wildcats in the second half en route to the 21-0 victory. UGA held Kentucky to 177 total yard of offense and just 9 first downs. Meanwhile, tailback D'Andre Swift rushed for 179 yards and two touchdowns to lead Georgia, which didn't have he ball in Kentucky territory until the 6:31 mark of the second half. Swift scored on a 39-yard run one play later to give the Bulldogs all the points they would need. It was a scoreless tie at the end of the first half, that first time that had happened in a Georgia game since a 10-0 loss to Alabama in 1991. Georgia out-gained Kentucky 123-52 through the first 30 minutes, but the closest the Bulldogs could et to crossing midfield was a fourth-and-1 attempt. Quarterback Jake Fromm was stopped on the play, coming up short. The Bulldogs average starting position on their six first-half drives was their own 15-yard line, and Smart was not in the mindset to take many chances with a wet ball and a wind. Fromm was 8-of-11 for 29 yards passing in the first half, and UGA ran the ball 16 straight times in the second half before he would attempt another pass. Fromm finished 9-of-12 passing for 35 yards, the Bulldogs gaining 235 yards on the ground. Stock Up D'Andre Swift was the MVP, no doubt, charging into a stacked Kentucky defensive front throughout the night, but still managing to average 8.5 yards per carry in leading the offense. Freshman WR George Pickens made the most of this first career start, making four catches for 35 yards to lead all receivers. Georgia pass coverage: UK's Lynn Bowden didn't complete a pass until there was 4 1/2 minutes left, throwing incomplete on his first nine attempts. J.R. Reed stepped up with physical play, forcing a fumble in the third quarter with big hit on QB Lynn Bowden. Richard LeCounte was strong in run support throughout the night, and he came up with a fumble recovery on the Kentucky 31 in the third quarter. Brian Herrien had four straight carries to extend UGA's lead to 14-0; runs of 3, 5 and 4 to pick up a first down at the 8, and he scored from there. Rodrigo Blankenship came up with a TD-saving tackle on Zach Johnson kick return at Georgia 40 Jeremaine Johnson with the QB pressure on Lynn Bowden on Kentucky's failed fourth down attempt at the UGA 9 in the fourth quarter. Stock Down Georgia short yardage offense: The Bulldogs couldn't convert a fourth-and-1 at the 50 with Fromm, even with Cade Mays and Charlie Woerner in the backfield as pushers. Prather Hudson is known as a special teams ace, but his holding call wiped out a 10-yard Dominick Blaylock punt return and pinned UGA back to the 9. Charlie Woerner holding penalty wipes out 8-yard Brian Herrien run. Woerner got blown up on a James Cook swing pass in the first quarter, too. Safety Divaad Wilson missed open-field tackle on 9-yard RB run for first down The post Georgia football stock report: Defense locks down Kentucky 21-0 appeared first on DawgNation.
  • ATHENS Georgia put the game on D'Andre Swift's shoulders Saturday night, and the junior tailback delivered. The No. 10-ranked Bulldogs beat Kentucky 21-0 thanks to Swift's hard-charging ways. The junior from Philadelphia carried 21 times for 179 yards and 2 touchdowns. Swift had strong comments about the Bulldogs' offense earlier in the week. Swift felt more passes downfield should be called in the wake of last week's 20-17 overtime loss to South Carolina. 'They put a lot of people in the box so it's hard,' Swift said. 'Once you get past one level, there are three guys right there.' That was once again the case on Saturday night. But Swift found a way to break tackles and make Kentucky defenders miss with 6:20 left in the game. The Bulldogs had taken over a the Wildcats' 39 after a 15-yard punt, their first possession in Kentucky's territory in the game. Swift took the handoff and broke right, making two Wildcats' defenders miss at the line before outracing the reminder of the Kentucky defense to the end zone to break a scoreless tie. Swifted added a 3-yard TD run with 6:24 left to make it 21-0, capping a 13-play, 92-yard drive to essentially put the game on ice. Georgia has a bye next Saturday and will return to action at 3:30 p.m. on Nov. 2 in Jacksonville, Fla., against Florida. The post Georgia football game ball: D'Andre Swift carries Bulldogs to 21-0 win appeared first on DawgNation.
  • ATHENS Georgia's defense came to play and Kirby Smart planned accordingly Saturday night. The No. 10-ranked Bulldogs (6-1, 3-1 SEC) recorded their second shutout of the season, blanking Kentucky 21-0 amid heavy rain and gusting winds at Sanford Stadium. Tailback D'Andre Swift rushed for 179 yards and two touchdowns as UGA played mistake-free football on offense, pounding the Wildcats with its giant offensive line and productive run game. Kentucky managed just 177 yards of total offense, not completing a pass until there was just 4 1/2 minutes left. Jake Fromm was 9-of-12 passing for 35 yards, deferring to a ground game that picked up steam has the minutes passed by. Georgia rushed for 235 yards on 42 carries, scoring three rushing touchdowns in the second half to pull away. Georgia has a bye next Saturday before returning to action at 3:30 p.m. on Nov. 2 against Florida in Jacksonville. Here's how the game broke down: Fourth Quarter Georgia 21, Kentucky 0, 6:24:D'Andre Swift 3-yard run (Rodrigo Blankenship kick). Drive:13 plays, 92 yards, 8:18. Key Play: Brian Herrien 14-yard run. Kentucky stopped on fourth-and-goal at 8-yard line, 14:42. Third Quarter Georgia 14, Kentucky 0, 1:54: Brian Herrien 8-yard run (Rodrigo Blankenship kick). Drive: 5 plays, 31 yards, 2:36. Key play: D'Andre Swift 11-yard run. Georgia 7, Kentucky 0, 6:20: D'Andre Swift 39-yard run (Rodrigo Blankenship kick. Drive: One play, 39 yards, 11 seconds. Key play: 15-yard shanked Kentucky punt. HALFTIME NOTES It's the first scoreless first half in a Georgia game since 1991, when the Bulldogs played Alabama in Tuscaloosa, losing 10-0. Georgia held Kentucky without a completed pass. Georgia held Kentucky to 52 yards of total offense. UAG lead the SEC and ranks sixth in the nation in scoring defense (12.3 ppg). Freshman WR George Pickens made his first career start. SECOND QUARTER Georgia explosive plays: Fromm to Pickens, 22 yards D'Andre Swift 23-yard run D'Andre Swift 20-yard run Jake Fromm 8-of-11, 28 yards; Lynn Bowden 0-of-3 passing D'Andre Swift 9-81 rushing; Lynn Bowden 7-26 George Pickens 3-28 receiving Georgia stopped on fourth-and-1 at 50-yard line, 8:51 FIRST QUARTER 53 degrees, feels like 49, winds at 14 mph, rain Georgia wins toss, will receive SEC Saturday 10-19-19 Auburn 51, Arkansas 10, Final Florida 38, South Carolina 27, Final LSU 36, Mississippi State 13, Final Vanderbilt 21, Missouri 14, Final Texas A&M at Ole Miss, 7:30 p.m. kickoff Tennessee at Alabama, 9 p.m. kickoff Pregame Mecole Hardman leads calling of the Dawgs CB DJ Daniel announced as a starter; CB Tyson Campbell (foot) appears full-speed in warmups, questionable to play First-team offensive line in warmups: LT Andrew Thomas, LG Cade Mays, C Trey Hill, RG Ben Cleveland, RT Isaiah Wilson George Pickens announced as a starter along with Demetris Robertson and Tyler Simmons in WR corps BIG TEN UPSET: No. 6 Wisconsin falls as 30-point underdog to Illinois SEC Scores: See Below ATHENS Georgia football opens the second half of the season looking for improvement, and it starts with players stepping up and emerging. The No. 10-ranked Bulldogs play host to Kentucky at 6 p.m. on Saturday in a game that should provide plenty of opportunities for players on all levels. Redshirt freshman Kearis Jackson is back from a broken hand and could break out, and Coach Kirby Smart has continued to praise the improvement of linebackers Nolan Smith and Nakobe Dean. Freshman defensive back Tyrique Stevenson was identified as one of the most promising players in spring drills and at the start of fall camp, and he could be on the verge of taking the next step. 'He's really improving, he's coming in, he's meeting more,' UGA cornerback Eric Stokes said, asked about Stevenson's progress. 'He's finally learning the ropes, like, I need to come in and start doing a little bit.' 'He was going through a freshman slump like anybody, it's just a learning experience, but he's finally starting to pick it up.' Smart said Stevenson has looked better in practices of late, too. ' Tyrique had a good week of practice last week and he actually played in the game when Mark Webb's injury occurred,' Smart said, reflecting on Stevenson's snaps against South Carolina. 'He had two opportunities to make tackles he missed those opportunities one was on a close sack, 'I think that's more of an experience of playing not a lack of ability. But those are the growing pains you have to go through when you play guys who are getting their first considerable playing time. But he's still in a battle at (dime defensive back) to play, he's in a battle at corner. He's becoming a better practice player.' Pregame Reads Former UGA star Eric Zeier gives his take on Bulldogs' offense Podcast: D'Andre Swift's comments on offense gain attention Kirby Smart concerned about the weather conditions' Promising Nolan Smith grows, expands role Receivers must step up, beat press coverage Closer look: How Georgia's offense adds up The post Georgia football game recap: Bulldogs pull away from Kentucky, 21-0 appeared first on DawgNation.