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Entertainment

    Sammy Shore, an actor and standup comedian who co-founded the Comedy Store, died Saturday. He was 92. Through a spokeswoman, Shore's family said he died at his Las Vegas home surrounded by family. He was the father of actor-comedian Pauly Shore. Shore's nearly seven-decade career stretched from the 'Borscht Belt' summer resorts of New York's Catskill Mountains to Las Vegas to the studios of Hollywood. Shore began his career doing standup with Shecky Greene. Elvis Presley chose Shore as the opening act for his comeback tour, and the comedian opened for many others, including Tony Orlando, Barbra Streisand, Tony Bennett, Sammy Davis Jr., Tom Jones, Ann-Margret, Connie Stevens, Bobby Darin, and Glen Campbell. In 1972, Shore, his first wife Mitzi and writing partner Rudy Deluca founded the world-famous Los Angeles comedy club, the Comedy Store. Pauly Shore, with whom he toured during the past 20 years, paid tribute Saturday to his father on Twitter. 'Dad, you lived an amazing life and I'm so proud to say that you are my father,' he wrote. 'When you're in heaven I'll be killing the crowds night after night and carrying on your legacy. Love you Dad. Rest in peace.' The elder Shore also appeared in a number of films, including 'The Bellboy' with Jerry Lewis and Mel Brooks' 'Life Stinks' and 'History of the World Part 1.' He also appeared on 'The Ed Sullivan Show' and was a guest on the Tony Orlando and Pointer Sisters' TV shows, as well as Redd Foxx's 'Sanford and Son.' Shore was also an author and recorded several albums. He also leaves behind his wife of 29 years, Suzanne.
  • The Latest on the Grand Final of the Eurovision Song Contest (all times local): 2:00 a.m. The Netherlands is the winner of the 2019 Eurovision Song Contest. Duncan Laurence's doleful piano ballad 'Arcade' was tapped as an early front-runner before Saturday's Grand Final. But it had to rely on the fan vote to secure the country's fifth win in the competition. Italy finished second, followed by Russia, Switzerland and Norway. Some 200 million people around the world were expected to watch the annual campy contest with 26 nations battling to be crowned Europe's best pop act. ___ 12:55 a.m. Europe's ultimate pop extravaganza is hosting the Queen of Pop. Madonna was the special guest Saturday at the Grand Final of the Eurovision Song Contest in Tel Aviv where 26 nations were battling to be crowned Europe's best pop act. Some 200 million people around the world are expected to be watching the annual campy contest. Israel earned the right to host the show after Netta Barzilai carried off last year's prize with her spunky pop anthem 'Toy.' Madonna had faced calls to boycott the event by a Palestinian-led campaign. But she rejected them, saying she will 'never stop playing music to suit someone's political agenda.' Madonna performed her hit song, 'Like a Prayer,' marking 30 years to its release, and a new song 'Future' from her forthcoming album 'Madame X.' ___ 12:05 a.m. The 26 contestants in the Grand Final of the 64th Eurovision Song Contest have finished their acts. Now the voting gets underway. To maximize onscreen tension, performers are picked Saturday by a mix of fan votes and professional juries from the participating countries. Spectators cannot vote for their own country, but like-minded countries tend to fall into blocs that back their regional favorites. Israel earned the right to host the show after Netta Barzilai won last year with her spunky pop anthem 'Toy.' The Netherlands has been tapped as an early front-runner for Duncan Laurence's doleful piano ballad 'Arcade.' Other favorites include Switzerland's energetic 'She Got Me,' sung by Luca Hänni, Sweden's soulful 'Too Late for Love,' sung by John Lundvik, and Australia's breathy act, 'Zero Gravity,' by Kate Miller-Heidke. ___ 23:30 p.m. Iceland's controversial steampunk band Hatari has concluded their live performance without incident. The band had drawn attention in Israel by initially vowing to stay out, saying it would be 'absurd' to participate in Israel because of its policies toward the Palestinians. Later, they vowed to use the Eurovision spotlight to expose the 'face of the occupation.' But at a press conference after the semifinal, Hatari offered a purely positive message. 'We need to unite and remember to love,' it said, in the wake of 'hate that's on the rise in Europe.' In Saturday's final they belted out their grinding metal rock to cheers from the audience. They are not a favorite to win. Calls for performers to boycott the show have failed to generate much momentum. ___ 23:20 Israel's prime minister has called the country's Eurovision representative to wish him luck in the contest. Benjamin Netanyahu's office says he spoke to Kobi Marimi Saturday night to tell him the 'the entire nation is supporting you.' Marimi, with his song 'Home,' is considered a long shot to win. He has a tough act to follow after Netta Barzilai won it all for Israel last year with her spunky pop anthem 'Toy.' Israel has won the Eurovision four previous times and it has provided the country with some cultural touchstones. 'Hallelujah' became the country's unofficial national song after Milk and Honey won the contest Israel hosted in the late 1970s, and Dana International became a national hero and global transgender icon when she won with 'Diva' in 1998. ___ 22:00 The Grand Final of the 64th Eurovision Song Contest is under way. Europe's annual music extravaganza will crown one of 26 entries with dreams of following in the footsteps of past winners such as Swedish pop icons ABBA and Celine Dion, who represented Switzerland. The show is taking place at Tel Aviv's Expo Center, starting at 10 p.m. Saturday (1900 GMT.) Some 200 million people around the world are expected to be watching. Israel earned the right to host the show after Netta Barzilai carried off last year's prize with her spunky pop anthem 'Toy.' The show of European unity brings together acts from 41 countries, including those with little connection to Europe, such as Australia. The final round's winner will be influenced by TV viewers casting votes via text message.
  • The Netherlands won the 2019 Eurovision Song Contest in Tel Aviv Saturday, with Duncan Laurence's doleful piano ballad 'Arcade' crowned champion of Europe's annual music extravaganza. The 25-year-old was tapped as an early front-runner before the Grand Final but was only ranked third after the vote of professional juries from the 41 participating countries, trailing Sweden and North Macedonia. He surged ahead thanks to the fan vote, securing The Netherlands its fifth win ever in the competition. Italy finished second, followed by Russia, Switzerland and Norway. 'This is to dreaming big. This is to music first, always,' Laurence said, as he was handed the trophy from last year's winner, Israel's Netta Barzilai. Some 200 million people around the world were believed to have watched the annual campy contest with 26 nations battling in the Grand Final of the 64th Eurovision. Madonna was the star attraction, performing her hit staple, 'Like a Prayer,' marking 30 years since its release, and a new song 'Future' from her forthcoming album 'Madame X.' She took the stage after participants wrapped up their performances shortly after midnight when the elaborate voting process got underway across Europe. To maximize onscreen tension, performers are ranked by a mix of fan votes and professional juries. Spectators could not vote for their own country, but like-minded nations tend to fall into blocs that back their regional favorites, with politics meshing into art. The Eurovision debuted in the wake of World War II to heal a divided continent. Over the years, the earnest show of European unity has ballooned into an over-the-top, gay-friendly spectacle that brings together acts from across the continent, including those with little or no connection to Europe, such as Australia. Israel earned the right to host the show after Barzilai won last year's competition with her catchy pop anthem 'Toy.' The ostensibly non-political affair has tried to avoid the Israeli-Palestinian conflict and has largely succeeded, despite swirling threats of controversy. Calls for performers to boycott the show over Israeli policies toward Palestinians failed to generate much momentum. A small protest took place outside Tel Aviv's Expo Center before the show, following another one from musicians in Gaza earlier in the week. A recent round of rocket fire toward Israel from there also failed to temper excitement. Madonna herself had faced calls from a Palestinian-led campaign to avoid performing at the event in Israel. But the Queen of Pop rejected the boycott motions, saying she will 'never stop playing music to suit someone's political agenda.' Still, two of her embracing dancers sported the flags of Israel and the Palestinians on their backs. All eyes were on Iceland's controversial steampunk band Hatari, which had drawn attention for initially saying it would be 'absurd' to participate in Israel because of its policies toward the Palestinians. They had vowed to use the Eurovision spotlight to expose the 'face of the occupation,' but their live performance of grinding metal rock passed without incident. Only at the end of the broadcast, when their final vote tally was announced, did they whip out a Palestinian flag, to sounds of boos from the audience. For Israel, the mega event offered a much-anticipated opportunity to put its good face forward and project an image of normalcy to the world. Israel-themed promotional clips featuring each of the participants dancing in various scenic locations across the country streamed before each performance to a TV audience expected to be larger than that of the Super Bowl. The event itself was being hosted by a quartet of Israeli celebrities, including top model Bar Refaeli. Israel's own Wonder Woman Gal Gadot also made a cameo video appearance. The Tel Aviv hall was packed with thousands of screaming fans, while tens of thousands gathered to watch the final at the city-sponsored Eurovision village in Tel Aviv and at public screenings elsewhere. As the reigning champion, Israel swept straight through to the finals — along with the five European countries who most heavily funded the event. The other 20 participants qualified through a pair of semifinal rounds. Sweden's soulful 'Too Late for Love,' sung by John Lundvik, topped the professional jury vote and seemed to be on its way to carrying forward Sweden's successful Eurovision track record 45 years after Swedish icons ABBA won with 'Waterloo.' Israel has won the Eurovision four previous times and it has provided the country with some of its cultural touchstones. 'Hallelujah' became the country's unofficial national song after Milk and Honey won the contest for Israel when it hosted the event in the late 1970s, and Dana International became a national hero and global transgender icon when she won with 'Diva' in 1998. Barzilai became a role model for plus-size women after her win last year. She has been unapologetic about her weight, the loud colors she wears, and the funky chicken moves and sounds that have become her trademark. All of Israel's former winners took part in Saturday's event with Barzilai and Dana International ceremoniously getting it underway. ____ Follow Heller at www.twitter.con/aronhellerap
  • Ahead of Saturday's premiere of an Argentine documentary on abortion, dozens of women demonstrated for abortion rights on the red carpet at the Cannes Film Festival in France. Women, including the filmmakers and activists seen in the film, waved green handkerchiefs and carried a large banner while walking the Cannes carpet at the premiere of Argentine director Juan Solanas' 'Let It Be Law.' The documentary depicts Argentina's battle to legalize abortion. Argentina's Senate last year rejected a bill to legalize abortion, prompting protests in Buenos Aires streets. Green handkerchiefs have come to be symbol of the movement. A modified version of the bill is to be presented to Congress on May 28. The film's debut comes as abortion rights are also being fiercely contested in the U.S. On Tuesday, the Alabama Senate passed a bill that would outlaw almost all abortions in the state, including those involving pregnancies from rape or incest. Many in the movie industry in Cannes have followed the developments in the U.S. with concern. 'What's happening in Alabama is so important in the world,' Eva Longoria, who produced the Netflix documentary 'Reversing Roe,' said Friday at a 'Women in Motion' event in Cannes. 'It's going to affect everybody if we don't pay attention.
  • Actor Arnold Schwarzenegger was assaulted during a public appearance in South Africa on Saturday, but the 71-year-old quickly recovered and said, 'I'm just glad the idiot didn't interrupt my Snapchat.' Video shows the former California governor standing and filming children at a sporting event in Johannesburg when a man makes a flying kick into his back. Schwarzenegger stumbles forward. The man is quickly grabbed by security. Off camera a man shouts several times 'Help me!' The video shortly afterward shows Schwarzenegger smiling and shaking hands with bystanders before walking out ringed by security. Schwarzenegger later posted on Twitter: 'Thanks for your concerns, but there is nothing to worry about. I thought I was just jostled by the crowd, which happens a lot. I only realized I was kicked when I saw the video like all of you. I'm just glad the idiot didn't interrupt my Snapchat.' Schwarzenegger also tweeted a second video of the incident 'without whatever he was yelling so he doesn't get the spotlight.' 'By the way...' he joked, 'block or charge?' Schwarzenegger had been attending his Arnold Classic Africa event, which features dozens of sports and fitness activities. In a separate Twitter post, the event blamed a 'crazed fan' for the assault. The statement cited organizer Wayne Price as saying the assailant was 'known to the police for orchestrating similar incidents in the past' and that Schwarzenegger was 'fine and still in good spirits.' The actor confirmed he had no intention of pursuing charges and would continue with another appearance on Sunday as planned, the statement said. ___ Follow Africa news at https://twitter.com/AP_Africa
  • The Smithsonian's initiative on documenting Asians in America started humbly enough two decades ago, with a borrowed exhibit in a borrowed museum wing and a tiny staff. There was a National Museum of the American Indian attached to the Smithsonian, and progress was being made toward a museum on the National Mall celebrating African Americans' history. But Asian Americans in the 1990s remained a largely invisible population, with few people represented in entertainment, politics, sports or business. Those years were tough, said Franklin Odo, director at the time of the Smithsonian's Asian Pacific American program. 'Whenever we needed to do a public lecture or exhibit, I had to go beg one of these other institutions to lend a space,' Odo said. 'We had to really convince our colleagues that this was a field, this was a demographic ... that needed to be recognized and needed to be held with some respect.' On Saturday, the Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center launches a $25 million fundraising drive for permanent gallery space on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., with a glitzy party in Los Angeles full of celebrities and politicians. Several actors from the hit film 'Crazy Rich Asians' are expected to attend, along with Rep. Judy Chu and Rep. Doris Matsui, both Democrats representing California. If successful, an Asian American gallery could join museums and galleries dedicated to other historically underrepresented groups that have staked out space in a national park that is quintessentially American. Millions of people visit the National Mall every year to tour the White House, Lincoln Memorial and the treasures of the Smithsonian. 'The ability to have that visibility and recognition is so important,' said Lisa Sasaki, the center's director. Despite temporary exhibits along the mall, she said, 'there has never been a dedicated space where the public could consistently visit and find out about the history and culture of Asian Americans.' Asian Americans are the nation's fastest-growing minority and number about 20 million, or roughly 6% of the population. They come from more than 20 countries, with the largest populations from China, India, Vietnam, Philippines, Korea and Japan. They range from recent immigrants to descendants of laborers who migrated in the 19th century to build the Transcontinental Railroad and work sugar cane fields in Hawaii. Museum presence is huge, says Laura Lott, president and CEO of the American Alliance of Museums. 'Museums preserve what's important to society. They tell our stories, give historical context to contemporary issues and help us imagine a better future,' she said. Odo, the former director, said he had one part-time staffer and no exhibits of his own when the program began in 1997, so he borrowed one from a Los Angeles museum for the program's first installation, about the evolution of field lunches of Japanese immigrants in Hawaii. He says the Asian American community has evolved enough as an identity to support a permanent gallery dedicated to their shared experience in America. 'I don't know that we have an Oprah,' Odo said, referring to Oprah Winfrey's charitable foundation, which donated $21 million for the National Museum of African American History and Culture. But 'we have lots of people with immense means, so there's no question in my mind we can do it.' It's too early to say how large a gallery would be or when it might be secured, but Sasaki says they are looking at several locations along the mall. The 4,500-square-foot (418-square-meter) Molina Family Latino Gallery is scheduled to open in the Smithsonian's National Museum of American History in 2021. Sasaki says $25 million is a fundraising goal for phase one of the project. Congressional approval is not required for a gallery within existing space, unlike the stand-alone 400,000-square-foot (37,160-square-meter) National Museum of African American History and Culture, which opened in 2016 . The Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center is conscious of showing not just how Asians came to America, but how they have shaped American history. An example is a pin marking a successful 1960s grape boycott led by Mexican American and Filipino American laborers, who chose to band together. 'It tells a richer story about California history,' said Theodore Gonzalves, a Smithsonian curator. At Saturday's party, the iconic blue dress worn by Constance Wu's character in 'Crazy Rich Asians' will be presented as a donation from Marchesa to the Smithsonian National Museum of American History. The 2018 Hollywood film was the first in 25 years to feature an all Asian and Asian American cast. Organizers will also honor people and organizations at the gala, including hip-hop artist Jay Park and R&B jazz band Hiroshima. Helene An and her family will receive the 'Pioneer Award in Culinary Arts' for their role in introducing Vietnamese cuisine to mainstream Americans. An was a war refugee who landed in San Francisco in 1975, where her mother-in-law had bought an Italian diner and turned it into what they say was the city's first Vietnamese restaurant. An early menu lists 85-cent bowls of pho, the noodle soup that's become a dining staple in some U.S. cities. The diner became Thanh Long, a San Francisco best-of renowned for its signature roast crab and savory-sweet garlic noodles. The two dishes are so coveted they are prepared in a secret kitchen within the main kitchen. The House of AN, of which Helene is master chef, has grown to include several restaurants in California, a catering service and a cookbook. Chief executive Elizabeth An, 51, says her mother and family are honored to receive the award. 'My mother and grandmother cooked out of love but also as a necessity to survive, to give my sisters and me the best life possible,' she said. 'In doing so, we also shared our heritage and gave a voice to the Asian American immigrants in this country.' ___ Janie Har is a member of the AP's race and ethnicity team. Follow her on Twitter @janiehar
  • Actor Matthew McConaughey has finally received his high school diploma, more than 30 years after graduating. McConaughey was given his original diploma Friday night when he returned to his Texas alma mater to address the class of 2019. A Longview High School spokeswoman told the Longview News-Journal that graduates normally receive diploma holders during commencement ceremonies and that the actual diplomas must be picked up later. She said McConaughey never got his. The 49-year-old graduated from Longview in 1988. He responded to receiving his diploma with one word: 'proof.' McConaughey lives in Austin. He won an Oscar for his performance in 'Dallas Buyers Club.' He told the new graduates that he'd succeeded because he followed his heart, and that they should guard and follow theirs.
  • Thirty-nine years later, Jack is still not a dull boy. In a new pristine restoration, Stanley Kubrick's 'The Shining' premiered at the Cannes Film Festival on Friday evening. It was the second straight year that a Kubrick movie landed on the Croisette, following last year when Christopher Nolan brought what he termed an 'unrestored' cut of '2001: A Space Odyssey.' This time around, Alfonso Cuaron introduced the film, alongside Kubrick's daughter, Katharina Kubrick, and Leon Vitali, Kubrick's longtime assistant. Vitali was himself profiled in the 2017 documentary 'Filmworker,' also a Cannes entry. 'If anybody hasn't seen it on the screen before, it's a different experience completely,' Vitali told the crowd. 'Don't worry, you'll all come out of here alive.' Cuaron's presence in Cannes was notable. His film 'Roma' was set to premiere at the French festival last year. But when Netflix and the festival couldn't agree on distribution terms for the streaming giant's films, Netflix pulled out of Cannes and 'Roma' headed instead to the Venice Film Festival, where it won the Golden Lion prize. Cuaron didn't oversee 'The Shining' restoration. That role went to Steven Spielberg, whose 2018 sci-fi thriller 'Ready Player One' included a lengthy homage to 'The Shining.' But Cuaron lavished praise on 'The Shining' while playfully prodding conspiracy theorists that dig into the film for hidden meanings. 'Actually, tonight, we're going to watch it backwards, because backwards, we'll see it with the message Kubrick (intended),' joked Cuaron. The 2012 documentary 'Room 237' chronicled some of those theories, including that 'The Shining' is really about the moon landing or about the treatment of Native Americans. Katharina Kubrick used an expletive to describe the guessing games around 'The Shining.' 'This is a seriously cool ghost movie. Don't believe any of the conspiracy theories because it's all s---,' she said. 'I only said that because I've had some champagne.' Cuaron agreed. 'Kubrick would have really gotten a laugh out of all of these conspiracy theories,' said the director. 'By all reports, he believed in films not to be explained but to be experienced. A little bit like music, he used to say.' 'The Shining' restoration will be released on home video Oct. 1. ___ Follow AP Film Writer Jake Coyle on Twitter at: http://twitter.com/jakecoyleAP
  • Queen Elizabeth II and other royal family members have gathered at St George's chapel in Windsor for the wedding of the daughter of the monarch's first cousin. Lady Gabriella Windsor's marriage to Thomas Kingston Saturday marked the third royal wedding at the 15th-century venue in less than a year after the nuptials of the Duke and Duchess of Sussex last May and Princess Eugenie and Jack Brooksbank in October. Prince Harry left Meghan at home with newborn son Archie and arrived with his uncle and aunt, Prince Edward and Princess Anne. The bride's gown was designed by Luisa Beccaria, while the monarch wore a pink A-line coat, and a lilac and pink silk dress by Stewart Parvin. The bride is the daughter of Prince and Princess Michael of Kent.
  • To messages of support and puzzlement, Kim Kardashian West has, seemingly, revealed her newborn's name: Psalm West. The beauty mogul, reality star, law student and wife of Kanye West took to her social streams to share the first look at their fourth child, born May 9. A photo of the boy nestled in a crib came in the form of a text message screen grab with her husband that called it a 'Beautiful Mother's Day' and said the couple are 'blessed beyond measure.' The baby is their second boy and the second to be born via surrogate because of a potentially life-threatening medical condition that complicated Kardashian West's two pregnancies. The baby joins 5-year-old sister North, 3-year-old brother Saint and 15-month-old sister Chicago.