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Entertainment Headlines

    The foundation behind the prestigious Genesis Prize says this year's winner, Natalie Portman, has pulled out of the June awards ceremony in Israel, quoting a representative for the U.S. actress as saying recent events in Israel were 'extremely distressing to her.' The Genesis Prize Foundation says it was informed Portman 'does not feel comfortable participating in any public events in Israel.' The statement late Thursday did not refer to specific events. Israel has faced criticism for its response to mass protests on the Gaza-Israel border, in which 28 Palestinians were killed and hundreds wounded by Israeli fire since March 30. Israel says it's defending its border. The foundation says it fears Portman's decision will 'cause our philanthropic initiative to be politicized.' The prize recognizes Jewish achievement and contributions to humanity.
  • President Donald Trump's lawyer is asking a federal judge in Los Angeles to delay a court case brought by a porn actress who claims she had an affair with the president. U.S. District Judge James Otero is set to hear arguments Friday morning about whether to delay Stormy Daniels' case after FBI agents raided the office and residence of Trump's lawyer, Michael Cohen, seeking records about a nondisclosure agreement Daniels signed days before the 2016 presidential election. Daniels, whose real name is Stephanie Clifford, has been seeking to invalidate the agreement and has offered to return the $130,000 she was paid in order to publicly discuss the relationship and 'set the record straight.' She argues the agreement is legally invalid because it was only signed by Daniels and Cohen, but was not signed by Trump. Cohen, who has denied there was ever an affair, said he paid the $130,000 out of his pocket using a home equity loan. He has said neither the Trump Organization nor the Trump campaign was a party to the transaction with Daniels and he was not reimbursed for the payment. Trump answered questions about Daniels for the first time earlier this month and said he had no knowledge of the payment made by Cohen and didn't know where Cohen had gotten the money. The White House has repeatedly said Trump denies the affair. Cohen's attorneys have accused Daniels of violating the agreement's confidentiality clauses more than 20 times and said she could be liable for $1 million in damages for each violation. The case took on new significance last week when FBI agents raided Cohen's office, hotel and residence. The agents were seeking any information on payments made to Daniels and a former Playboy model, Karen McDougal, according to people familiar with the investigation but not authorized to discuss it publicly. The search warrants also sought bank records, records on Cohen's dealings in the taxi industry and his communications with the Trump campaign, the people said. After the raids, Cohen asked a judge in Los Angeles to grant a stay for at least 90 days and argued that because the allegations in the lawsuit overlap with the criminal investigation, Cohen's civil rights 'may be adversely affected if this case proceeds.' Daniels' attorney, Michael Avenatti, has objected to the delay and pressed for the case to continue immediately. In a tweet on Thursday, Avenatti said he would 'vehemently argue against the attempt by Mr. Cohen and Mr. Trump to delay this case.' 'The American people deserve the truth as quickly as possible,' he said.
  • Some of Prince's closest confidants had grown increasingly alarmed about his health in the days before he died and tried to get him help as they realized he had an opioid addiction — yet none were able to give investigators the insight they needed to determine where the musician got the fentanyl that killed him, according to investigative documents released Thursday. Just ahead of this weekend's two-year anniversary of Prince's death, prosecutors announced they would file no criminal charges in the case and the state investigation was closed. 'My focus was lasered in on trying to find out who provided that fentanyl, and we just don't know where he got it,' said Carver County Attorney Mark Metz. 'We may never know. ... It's pretty clear from the evidence that he did not know, and the people around him didn't know, that he was taking fentanyl.' Metz said Prince had suffered from pain for years and likely believed he was taking a common painkiller. Prince was 57 when he was found alone and unresponsive in an elevator at his Paisley Park studio compound on April 21, 2016. His death sparked a national outpouring of grief and prompted a joint investigation by Carver County and federal authorities. An autopsy found he died of an accidental overdose of fentanyl, a synthetic opioid 50 times more powerful than heroin. The investigative materials — including documents , photos and videos — were posted online Thursday afternoon. Several images show the music superstar's body on the floor of his Paisley Park estate, near an elevator. He is on his back, his head on the floor, eyes closed. His right hand is on his stomach and left arm on the floor. The documents include interviews with Prince's inner circle. That included longtime friend and bodyguard Kirk Johnson, who told investigators that he had noticed Prince 'looking just a little frail,' but said he did not realize he had an opioid addiction until he passed out on a plane a week before he died. 'It started to all making sense though, just his behavior sometimes and change of mood and I'm like oh this is what, I think this is what's going on, that's why I took the initiative and said let's go to my doctor because you haven't been to the doctor, let's check it all out,' Johnson said, according to a transcript of an interview with investigators. Johnson said after that episode, Prince canceled some concerts as friends urged him to rest. Johnson also said that Prince 'said he wanted to talk to somebody' about his addiction. Johnson asked his own doctor, Michael Todd Schulenberg, to see Prince on April 7, 2016. Schulenberg told authorities he gave Prince an IV; authorities said he also prescribed Vitamin D and a nausea medication — under Johnson's name. Johnson then called Schulenberg on April 14, asking the doctor to prescribe a pain medication for Prince's hip. Schulenberg did so, again under Johnson's name, Metz said. On the night of April 14 to April 15, Prince passed out on a flight home from Atlanta, and the private plane made an emergency stop in Moline, Illinois. The musician had to be revived with two doses of a drug that reverses effects of an opioid overdose. A paramedic told a police detective that after the second shot of naloxone, Prince 'took a large gasp and woke up,' according to the investigative documents. He said Prince told paramedics, 'I feel all fuzzy.' A nurse at the hospital where Prince was taken for monitoring told detectives that he refused routine overdose testing that would have included blood and urine tests. When asked what he had taken, he didn't say what it was, but that 'someone gave it to him to relax.' Other documents say Prince said he took one or two pills. The documents show that Johnson contacted Schulenberg again on April 18, and expressed concern that Prince was struggling with opioids. At that time, Schulenberg told investigators, Johnson apologized for asking the doctor to prescribe the previous painkiller. An assistant to Prince told investigators that he had been unusually quiet and sick with the flu in the days before he was found dead. Meron Bekure said she last saw Prince a day earlier, when she was going to take him to the doctor for a checkup but that Prince told her he would go with Johnson instead. On that day, Schulenberg saw Prince and ran some tests and prescribed other medications to help him. A urinalysis came back positive for opioids. That same day, Paisley Park staffers contacted California addiction specialist Dr. Howard Kornfeld. The doctor sent his son, Andrew, to Minnesota that night, and the younger Kornfeld was among those who found Prince's body. Andrew Kornfeld was carrying buprenorphine, a medication that can be used to help treat opioid addiction. Andrew Kornfeld told investigators that Prince was still warm to the touch when he was found, but that rigor mortis had begun to set in. The documents also show that Prince's closest confidants knew he was a private person and tried to respect that, with Johnson saying: 'That's what pisses me off cause it's like man, how did he hide this so well?' Metz said some of Prince's friends might have enabled him as they tried to protect him. 'There is no doubt that the actions of individuals will be criticized, questioned and judged in the days and weeks to come,' Metz said. 'But suspicions and innuendo are categorically insufficient to support any criminal charges.' The U.S. attorney's office also said Thursday it had no credible evidence that would lead to federal criminal charges. A law enforcement official close to the investigation told The Associated Press that the federal investigation is now inactive unless new information emerges. The official spoke on condition of anonymity because the federal case remains open. But federal authorities announced that Schulenberg had agreed to pay $30,000 to settle a civil violation from the allegation that he illegally prescribed the opioid oxycodone for Prince in Johnson's name. Schulenberg admitted to no facts or liability in the settlement, which includes stricter monitoring of his prescribing practices, and authorities said he is not the target of a criminal investigation. Oxycodone, the generic name for the active ingredient in OxyContin, was not listed as a cause of Prince's death. But it is part of a family of painkillers driving the nation's addiction and overdose epidemic, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Nearly 2 million Americans abused or were addicted to prescription opioids, including oxycodone, in 2014. A confidential toxicology report obtained by the AP in March showed high concentrations of fentanyl in the singer's blood, liver and stomach. The concentration of fentanyl in Prince's blood alone was 67.8 micrograms per liter, which outside experts called 'exceedingly high.' Prince did not have a prescription for fentanyl. Metz said several pills were found at the Paisley Park complex after Prince died, and some were later determined to be counterfeit. The underground market for counterfeit prescription pain pills is brisk and can be highly anonymous, said Carol Falkowski, CEO of Drug Abuse Dialogues, a Minnesota-based drug abuse training and consulting organization. Buyers often don't know who they're dealing with or what's in the drugs they purchase, she said. The likelihood of people buying pain pills on the street or online that turn out to be counterfeits laced with fentanyl is 'extremely high,' said Traci Green, a Boston University Medical Center epidemiologist who focuses on the opioid epidemic. ___ Associated Press writers Steve Karnowski and Doug Glass in Minneapolis, Ryan J. Foley in Des Moines, Iowa, and Tammy Webber in Chicago contributed this report. ___ Follow Amy Forliti on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com . More of her work is at: https://apnews.com/search/amy%20forliti .
  • Old 'Scarface' friends said hello again at a 35th anniversary screening Thursday that reunited stars Al Pacino, Michelle Pfeiffer and Steven Bauer and filmmaker Brian De Palma for an evening full of reflection on how the ferocious and garish gangster epic — like Tony Montana's rise from dishwasher to drug lord — has grown in stature. The reunion, held at New York's Beacon Theatre, was one of the main events of the just kicked-off Tribeca Film Festival. The festival has made such anniversaries a regular feature in recent years, many of them celebrating classics of Tribeca co-founder Robert De Niro. But the 'Scarface' event was for a movie De Niro reportedly turned down, and which now lives on as one of Pacino's maximum performances. De Palma, the celebrated 77-year-old filmmaker of 'Carlito's Way' and 'The Untouchables,' suggested the arc of Montana in 'Scarface' was reminiscent of President Donald Trump's. 'I've always been interested about making movies about people who start rather humbly and then acquire a great deal of power and then ultimately isolate themselves and live in their own world. Could that be anything we're experiencing now?' said De Palma with a laugh. The reunion wasn't without its hitches. When the post-screening panel moderator Jesse Kornbluth — as seemingly an opening to discuss Pfeiffer's character's gaunt, cocaine-snorting habits — asked the actress how much she weighed when making the film, boos echoed around the theater. But the affection the crowd had for 'Scarface' was palpable throughout the evening, with applause bursting out frequently during the nearly three-hour film for favorite scenes and cherished lines. De Palma's 1983 film, penned by Oliver Stone, was a remake of the Howard Hawks-directed 1932 gangster film of the same name. (De Palma even dedicated the film to Hawks and screenwriter Ben Hecht.) The project began with Pacino being enthralled by the original. 'I was completely taken with Paul Muni's performance,' said Pacino. 'After I saw that, I thought: I want to be Paul Muni. I want to act like that.' The idea to update the immigrant story to Cuban refugees in Miami came from filmmaker Sidney Lumet, who was briefly attached to direct. The Mariel boatlift in 1980 brought some 125,000 refugees to Florida from Fidel Castro's Cuba. (An updated, Los Angeles-set remake to 'Scarface' has been rumored, with 'Training Day' filmmaker Antoine Fuqua recently attached to direct a script by David Ayer, Jonathan Herman and Joel and Ethan Coen.) De Palma's film was a box office hit, the 16th highest grossing film of the year. But it received mixed reviews. Though some, including Roger Ebert, raved about it, critics like David Ansen of Newsweek called it 'grand, shallow, decadent entertainment.' Yet for many, its reputation has grown over the years, especially on dorm-room walls and in hip-hop, where 'Scarface' became a revered influence. 'It's caught on in such a way, and we have experienced it,' said Pacino. 'This wasn't the way it started. When 'Scarface' first came out, it was extremely controversial.' The hyper-violent film initially received an 'X'' rating from the Motion Picture Association of America's ratings board. De Palma said he went through three edits on the film without receiving an 'R'' rating before he and producer Martin Bregman decided to withdraw any changes. 'Marty said, 'We'll go to war with these people,'' said De Palma, still relishing the battle. 'And that's what we did.' Some also took issue with how the film depicted Cuban immigrants as vicious drug-dealers at a time when many were trying to get a foothold in the United States. 'A lot of the old-school Cubans were concerned with me almost to the point that they weren't really sure that my participation in a Hollywood movie was worth me downgrading or degrading or tainting the image of their accomplishments in the new society,' said the Cuban-born Bauer. 'What I tried to convey to them was: Relax, man. It's a movie.' Pfieffer, too, said she's been asked over the years about playing a female character with so little agency in 'Scarface.' 'I felt that by allowing people to observe who this character is and the sacrifices that she's made said more (than) getting up on any soap box and preaching to people,' said Pfeiffer. The actress added that her experience acting alongside Pacino was life-changing. 'One of the things that hit me the strongest was watching him fiercely protect character, really at all costs and without any sort of apology,' said Pfeiffer. 'I have always tried to emulate that. I try to be polite about it. I think that's what really makes great acting.' Pacino also shared one of his most vivid memories. While filming the final shootout, he burned his hand badly enough to shut shooting down for two weeks. 'I grabbed the barrel of the gun I just fired. My hand stuck to it. It just stuck to it,' said Pacino. Pacino promptly left the set to be bandaged at a hospital. 'This nurse comes up to me later and she says, 'You're Al Pacino.' I said 'Yeah.' And she said, 'I thought you were some scumbag,'' Pacino recalled chuckling. 'There's something there.' ___ Follow AP Film Writer Jake Coyle on Twitter at: http://twitter.com/jakecoyleAP
  • Susette Kelo's Supreme Court case now has a Hollywood ending, just not the one she hoped for. What Kelo wanted when she took her case to the high court more than a decade ago was to get to stay in her little pink house in New London, Connecticut. The city was trying to force her out to make way for development, and Kelo didn't want to go. The high court ruled against her. Now, however, Kelo's story has been turned into a movie, 'Little Pink House,' opening Friday in limited nationwide release. It's a movie she and those involved in the film hope will get people to think about the government's power to take private property for public use. Governments can use that power, called eminent domain, as long as they fairly compensate owners. Kelo, who was in Washington this week to speak about the film, said what city and state officials did 'ripped our hearts out.' Kelo wasn't looking for a fight when she bought her house overlooking the Thames River in 1997 and had it painted Odessa Rose pink. Divorced and with five grown sons, she was looking for a place of her own. She found it in the 100-year-old cottage. Shortly after she moved in, pharmaceutical manufacturer Pfizer announced it would move in nearby, building a research facility that opened in 2001. New London hoped Pfizer's move could help revitalize the city and, with the help of a private nonprofit development corporation, sought to redevelop land near the facility. A hotel, housing, office space, restaurants and shopping were planned. To get it done, the city authorized the use of eminent domain. Kelo thought that was wrong, and she and a small group of other homeowners took on the city. They acknowledged eminent domain could be used to take their homes for public uses such as a road or military base, but they argued the planned development didn't count. 'She was just fearless,' said Oscar-nominated actress Catherine Keener, who plays Kelo in the movie. 'She took on everybody.' Kelo had help. The Virginia-based Institute for Justice represented her and the other homeowners. The group was also instrumental in the new movie's making, bringing a book about the case to the attention of filmmakers Courtney Moorehead Balaker and Ted Balaker. Courtney Balaker, the movie's writer and director, said she was 'blown away' by Kelo's case but also by Kelo herself. She compared her story to that of Erin Brockovich, a non-lawyer and divorced mother of three who took on utility company PG&E over contaminated groundwater in Hinkley, California, inspiring a 2000 movie. One big difference: Brockovich won. In 2005, the Supreme Court ruled against Kelo 5-4. Three justices who sided with the city — Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Stephen Breyer and Anthony Kennedy — are still on the court. The two others — John Paul Stevens and David Souter — have since retired. The justices wrote that the city had carefully crafted a development plan it believed would benefit the community. They agreed the use of eminent domain was permitted. 'I want people to walk away thinking about if that's right,' Balaker said. Stevens, the Supreme Court justice who authored the opinion, has acknowledged it was the most unpopular one he wrote. Justice Antonin Scalia, who dissented from the decision, ranked it among the court's biggest mistakes. After the decision, more than 20 states significantly revised their laws to make it more difficult to take property through eminent domain, said Dana Berliner, litigation director for the Institute for Justice. Those changes didn't help Kelo, who had to move. And despite the lengthy legal battle, her land still stands empty. Pfizer announced in 2009 that it would leave New London. But submarine builder General Dynamics Electric Boat now occupies its former facility with many more employees, said New London Mayor Michael Passero. Passero said that's now helping spur development. Passero, a Democrat who grew up in the city, said while the movie vilifies the development corporation, he believes the people behind it had good motives, though they also made mistakes. More than anything, he said, the story is a cautionary tale about two sides becoming so polarized they couldn't find a middle ground. Kelo's little pink house was ultimately saved. Disassembled and moved but still painted pink, it stands on New London's Franklin Street. Although Kelo doesn't live there, she says she thinks about her former home and her legal fight often. 'A lot of people ask: 'How are you all doin'? ... How are your neighbors? How did you survive this?'' she said of recent appearances in connection with the movie. She answers that they've left the city, bought new homes and are trying to do 'the best we can to recover.' ___ Follow Jessica Gresko on Twitter at http://twitter.com/jessicagresko
  • Bill Cosby's lawyers are scrambling to make sure jurors at his sexual assault retrial hear from accuser Andrea Constand's confidante before deliberations get underway next week — but they're having trouble getting the woman to cooperate. Sheri Williams isn't responding to subpoena attempts, Cosby's lawyers said. Now they're seeking a judge's permission to read parts of her deposition into the record just as prosecutors did with Cosby's old testimony. Judge Steven O'Neill is expected to rule on the request on Friday. Constand testified at Cosby's first trial last year that she and Williams were good friends and would speak 'at all hours of the day: morning, noon, and night' and were in touch as she went to police in January 2005 with allegations he drugged and molested her about a year earlier. Cosby's lawyers said they expected Williams' testimony to refute Constand's claims that she was unaware he was romantically interested in her. They said she'd show that Constand 'could not have been the unwitting victim' prosecutors have portrayed. Williams' deposition was part of Constand's 2005 lawsuit against Cosby, who wound up settling for nearly $3.4 million. Two weeks in, Cosby's case is rapidly winding down. O'Neill is telling jurors that there are only a few more days of testimony. Cosby lawyer Tom Mesereau went into the case predicting it would last about a month. A pair of drug experts — one for the prosecution and one for the defense — spent Thursday debating one of the case's enduring mysteries: What drug did he give his chief accuser on the night she says he molested her? Cosby has insisted he handed 1½ tablets of the over-the-counter cold and allergy medicine Benadryl to Andrea Constand to help her relax before their sexual encounter at his mansion outside Philadelphia. Constand testified he gave her three small blue pills that left her incapacitated and unable to resist as he molested her. The experts agreed that paralysis isn't known to be a side effect of Benadryl, though its active ingredient can cause drowsiness and muscle weakness, among other side effects. Cosby's expert, Harry Milman, said he didn't know of any small blue pill that could produce the symptoms Constand described. The 'Cosby Show' star has previously acknowledged under oath he gave Quaaludes — a powerful sedative and 1970s-era party drug that's been banned in the U.S. for more than 35 years — to women he wanted to have sex with, but denied having them by the time he met Constand in the early 2000s. Dr. Timothy Rohrig, a forensic toxicologist called by prosecutors, testified Thursday that quaaludes can make people sleepy. But he and Milman said the drug came in large white pills — not small and blue. Prosecutors rested their case after Rohrig got off the witness stand. The defense immediately asked Judge Steven O'Neill to acquit Cosby and send jurors home, arguing prosecutors hadn't proved aggravated indecent assault charges. O'Neill refused. Cosby's lawyers are expected to call several people who worked for him, including an executive assistant and employees of his talent agency and publicity firm. It's likely part of a bid to challenge the prosecution's contention that the alleged assault happened within the 12-year statute of limitations. Williams' deposition testimony could have insights into what led Constand to accuse Cosby and whether the encounter was a factor in her leaving her job a few months later as the director of women's basketball operations at Temple University. A private investigator working for the defense said he attempted to serve Williams at least six times at her North Carolina home before sending her a FedEx package containing a subpoena and instructions to call Cosby's legal team. Williams' name already has come up several times at the retrial. Constand testified that Williams was the friend she cut and pasted emails from for a business that Cosby's lawyers described as a Ponzi scheme. Cosby lawyer Kathleen Bliss questioned Constand's mother about Andrea's friendship with Williams and suggested that they were on the outs about a month before Constand went to police. 'What has Sheri got to do with this?' Gianna Constand replied. Charles Kipps, a writer who worked with Cosby, testified he met Constand and Williams for dinner in New York as Constand was moving back to Canada in March 2004. The Associated Press does not typically identify people who say they are victims of sexual assault unless they grant permission, which Constand has done. ___ Follow Mike Sisak at https://twitter.com/mikesisak. ___ For more coverage visit https://www.apnews.com/tag/CosbyonTrial.
  • Bette Midler is not quite ready to say goodbye to her Dolly. The Divine Miss M is returning to the Tony Award-winning revival of 'Hello, Dolly!' on July 17 for a six-week run that will close the production on Aug. 25, The Associated Press has learned. Midler is not coming back empty-handed. She also has lured previous co-stars David Hyde Pierce and Gavin Creel back as well. Pierce earned a Tony nomination in the show and Creel won a best featured Tony. Tickets for the reunited cast's final shows go on sale on April 28. The iconic role of Dolly Levi marked Midler's return to the Broadway musical stage in about 50 years and she shattered box office records at the Shubert Theatre. She won the Tony for best actress in a musical. The Grammy- and Emmy Award-winner plays a matchmaker and schemer in the show, which features the songs 'Put On Your Sunday Clothes,' ''Before the Parade Passes By' and 'So Long Dearie.' Midler stepped into the role last spring and ended her run in mid-January. She was replaced by Bernadette Peters, who will now leave after the July 15 show. The first national tour of 'Hello, Dolly!' kicks off in October at Playhouse Square in Cleveland, Ohio, starring Tony Award-winner Betty Buckley. ___ Mark Kennedy is at http://twitter.com/KennedyTwits
  • A Southern California man pleaded not guilty Thursday to hate crimes after prosecutors say he threatened prominent members of the Jewish community and had with a 'kill list' that included the names of people in the entertainment industry. Nicholas Rose of Irvine pleaded not guilty to making criminal threats and violating civil rights, with sentencing enhancements for hate crimes. It's unclear whether the 26-year-old has an attorney. He has a court appearance set for April 27. A family member called the Orange Police Department on Monday and reported that Rose said he wanted to kill people and specifically threatened the Jewish community, according to the Orange County District Attorney's Office. Police arrested Rose at his home Tuesday after saying they found 'kill lists' of prominent Jewish community members, steps titled 'killing my first Jew,' as well as references to churches and a synagogue in the area. He also had .22-caliber ammunition, prosecutors said. Prosecutor Jeff Moore told the Orange County Register that the kill lists included some well-known names in the entertainment industry and that everyone named has been alerted. He said investigators were reviewing Rose's writings, which he described as rambling. 'From his writings it's hard tell exactly what direction he's going in or who he was angry with,' Moore said. 'He was apparently displeased with some churches that he thought were sympathetic to the Jewish cause.
  • Rock star Bono, frontman for the band U2, has been presented with the first of what the George W. Bush Presidential Center intends to be an annual medal for individuals who change the world in some way. Former President George W. Bush presented the George W. Bush Medal for Distinguished Leadership to Bono on Thursday at the center. It was in recognition of Bono's humanitarian work against poverty and preventable diseases such as HIV/AIDS. In a video stream , Bono praised Bush, Congress and American taxpayers for progress made against AIDS in vulnerable populations. But he said the fight faces an uncertain future. He said there are problems with the Trump administration 'talking about turning back.' Bono said Americans must be 'very hard-headed' about arguing for saving lives.
  • The memorials to former first lady Barbara Bush have begun with a celebration of her life in front of Houston's City Hall. Mayor Sylvester Turner and several of Houston's leading clergy members from different faiths offered tributes to Bush. She died at her Houston home Tuesday at age 92. Hundreds attended the City Hall event on Thursday. The Houston Children's Chorus, a choir of 60 children that sang dozens of times for Bush and her husband, former President George H.W. Bush, performed. Meanwhile at the George W. Bush Presidential Center in Dallas, rock star Bono praised Barbara Bush for her public service impulse. He said he believed that moved her son, former President George W. Bush, to create the President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief. Bono was at the center to accept a medal for distinguished leadership.

Local News

  • Nobody was injured when bullets rattled through an Athens apartment early this morning. The suspect is still at large.  From The Athens-Clarke County Police:  On 04/19/2018 at just after 3:00 am, officers responded to Rivers Edge Apartments (2505 West Broad Street) in reference to an apartment being damaged by gunfire. The resident told officers she heard someone shoot several rounds through her glass back door. Officers observed damage to the door, which was a number of bullet-sized holes through the glass. When asked, the resident told officers that she did not know who would do this. No one was injured during this incident. At this time, we have no suspect information, and anyone who has information is asked to contact Detective McCauley at 706-613-3330 ext. 312. A Crimestoppers reward is available for anyone who provides credible information in this case ### 
  •  The Georgia Bulldog football team holds its last spring practice session before Saturday’s G-Day game: today’s drills will put the wraps on workouts that began last month. The G-Day game is set for 4 o’clock Saturday afternoon in Sanford Stadium. The Bulldogs are already penciling in schedules for upcoming seasons: the Indiana State Sycamores will play in Athens in 2013. From the AJC’s Chip Towers…   Elijah Holyfield has officially retired. From boxing, that is.  “Oh, no. Heck, no!” Holyfield said Tuesday of a possible return to boxing, which he last did competitively as a middle schooler. “I’ve been out of it too long, and I wouldn’t want to go in there and get hit again. I don’t want to get punched anymore. I get hit enough running.” That would be running with a football. And he’s going to stick with that a bit longer. In fact, Holyfield’s football career is just beginning to take off, in college anyway. At least it looks that way as the Georgia Bulldogs move toward the end of spring practice in Holyfield’s third year. All signs are point to the rising junior from College Park with the famous last name being Georgia’s primary ball carrier when G-Day kicks off this Saturday (4 p.m., ESPN, News 95.5 and AM 750 WSB). In a position largely defined by the “survival-of-the-fittest” model, Holyfield has both survived and proved the most fit this spring. As the Bulldogs prepare to play before an estimated crowd of 78,000 at Saturday, Holyfield is the odds-0n favorite to play the role of Georgia’s No. 1 tailback. Nick Chubb and Sony Michel have moved on, of course, and heir apparent D’Andre Swift is slightly gimpy with a groin injury. But Holyfield might’ve been the man anyway. In fact, that’s exactly what some of his teammates were saying about him on Tuesday. “That’s a man right there,” said defensive end David Marshall, who gets to tackle Holyfield almost every practice. “I love how he practices, I love how he comes hard every play. I’ve never seen him slacking, ever.” Holyfield and fellow junior Brian Herrien have managed to stay healthy while getting the majority of repetitions in Georgia’s considerable running back corps this spring. Ballyhooed freshman signee Zamir “Zeus” White is running drills but has not been cleared for contact while recovering from December knee surgery. Fellow blue-chip recruit James Cook hasn’t arrived yet. Georgia also has a small selection of walk-ons at running back, including sophomores Prather Hudson and Ian Donald-McIntyre. But Holyfield has created the buzz in camp. Not only does he look physically imposing, he has been playing a high level, as well. “He’s a physical, tough guy, one of my favorite competitors out there,” Georgia coach Kirby Smart said last week. “He’s got to pass protect better. He’s got to work on it, and that’s been a big emphasis for him. But I’m excited to see where he goes. He’s had some really good, tough runs this spring.” Holyfield’s opportunities to show his stuff have been very limited since he signed with the Bulldogs out of Atlanta’s Woodward Academy. Playing a mop-up role behind Chubb and Michel the last two seasons, he has only 56 career rushing attempts for 322 yards. But he has averaged 5.8 yards on those carries and recorded 2 touchdowns. Both of them were impressive, but especially the 39-yarder early in the fourth quarter against Florida last October. He capped it off with a Superman dive into the end zone. “Breaking that was really a confidence builder for me to know I can play on this level,” Holyfield said. Holyfield, who is listed at 5-foot-11, 217 pounds, is known as a strong, tough runner. But that play and the 90-yard kickoff return against Notre Dame that was nullified by a holding penalty demonstrated that he also has speed and some moves. But Holyfield is exceptionally strong and works hard to be that way. He doesn’t mind telling people that he can hang with Chubb when it comes to pumping iron. “I try to do what he could do,” Holyfield said. “I look at his numbers and try to get to those.” Asked if he matched any, Holyfield said, “Oh, yeah. Ask Chubb” — but he withheld details. Doesn’t matter. Playing running back is all about performing on the field. And while Saturday won’t be a sanctioned college football game, Holyfield’s excited to show Georgia fans what he has to offer in 2018. “I’m looking forward to G-Day and running the ball in front of a lot of people,” Holyfield said. “As I get the ball more I think everybody will see all the things I can do.” At one time, Holyfield was known as that Atlanta running back who looks strikingly similar to his famous father, world heavyweight boxing champion Evander Holyfield. But his goal is to be known as an exceptional football player by his own right. And he’s working hard to make it happen. “It’s not really a shadow,” he said of his father’s fame. “If it is, it’s just motivation to get out of it.”
  • A man from Commerce is in custody after leading Georgia State Troopers on a high-speed, two-county motorcycle chase. The State Patrol says the motorcycle, driven by 36 year-old Zachary Hix, reached speeds of almost 100 miles per hour on a chase along Highway 441 through Jackson and Banks counties. It ended when Hix wrecked his motorcycle. Troopers say he suffered non life-threatening injuries and was taken to Piedmont Athens Regional Medical Center for treatment.  The Walton County Sheriff’s Office says 39 year-old Jerome Mobley should be considered armed and dangerous. The search for the man accused of killing his wife at a home in Social Circle continued through the overnight hours. His abandoned pick-up truck was found in Hard Labor Creek State Park in Morgan County.    An Athens man, arrested in Randolph County, is convicted on child molestation charges in Hall County: 31 year-old Anthony Powers was also found guilty on statutory rape charges involving a Gainesville girl who was 14 years old at the time of their relationship. Powers’ conviction follows a three-day trial in Gainesville. Sentencing is pending. We have this morning the name of the man killed in a house fire in Habersham County: Roy Savage was 30 years old. The blaze burned a home off Highway 365 near Mt. Airy. The state Fire Marshal’s Office is investigating. 
  • The annual Greenfest is set for this afternoon in Athens: what organizers call a public, community-wide sustainability celebration is set for 5:30 at Flinchum’s Phoenix. The Georgia Climate Change Coalition will be recognized as this year’s winner of the Alec Little Environmental Award, a prize named in honor of the latest Athens environmentalist. From the A-CC government website…   GreenFest is a public, community-wide sustainability celebration providing citizens with the opportunity to increase their awareness of and interest in improving the environments of their homes, businesses, and community. Through peer nominations within the community to and by local organizations, the GreenFest Awards recognize sustainability leaders in Athens-Clarke County schools, businesses, community organizations, and government. We will also feature award winners from our K-12 student art, photography, and poetry contest. The 2018 theme is 'The Greenest Show in ACC!' based on the hit 2017 film, 'The Greatest Showman.
  • This will come as welcome news to students at the University of Georgia, and to their parents: the state Board of Regents voted this week to hold the line on tuition rates. There will be no tuition hikes for the academic year that starts in the fall. From the AJC… USG officials cited budget increases recently approved by Gov. Nathan Deal and state lawmakers, in part, as the reason for not raising tuition. The budget for the coming fiscal year, which begins July 1, is approximately $2.43 billion, about $115 million more that the current total. The board approved 14 fee increases at nine institutions. The increases are $3 to $31 per semester. USG Chancellor Steve Wrigley has emphasized making its colleges and universities more affordable in response to frequent criticism in recent years about tuition and fees. A 2016 state audit found a 77 percent increasein the cost of attending a state college or university in the prior 10 years. “We recognize the critical need to keep our institutions affordable for students while providing a quality education. The board’s decision today maintains our commitment to keeping tuition increases to a minimum,” Wrigley said. The two economic recessions during the 2000s resulted in severe state government cuts to the system, with the percentage of its budget from the state dropping from 75 percent in 2000 to 47 percent in 2018. Fiscal year spending per student has increased in recent years as the economy has improved, from about $5,500 in 2012 to more than $7,500 for the next fiscal year. The board also approved a capital budget for campus improvements of about $375 million for the next fiscal year, which officials said was its largest ever. Here’s the current academic year tuition for some colleges and universities for in-state students: University of Georgia $9,552 Georgia State University $8,730 Georgia Tech $10,008 Kennesaw State University $5,426 Sources: Universities of Georgia, Georgia State, Kennesaw State and Georgia Tech.

Bulldog News

  • ATHENS — Coach Kirby Smart is doing his best to make sure that Georgia’s best and brightest players will all be available to play in the G-Day Game. But there is increasing evidence some key players may have to sit out Saturday’s heavily-promoted intrasquad game at Sanford Stadium. As of Thursday evening, Smart was holding out hope that offensive stars Terry Godwin and D’Andre Swift will be available. Godwin practiced in a limited capacity Thursday but looked a bit gimpy while doing so with groin and knee injuries. Swift was also going through position drills but hasn’t been participating in full-contact work the last week. “Terry’s been banged up a little bit but we expect him to be able to go and to play,” Smart said. “He’s pushing through. He’s been really tough about it. He has some groin soreness and a slight MCL knee (injury). He’s been able to go.” As for Swift, Smart said: “We’ll see how he does. He’s been able to do some things but hasn’t been able to do everything. He hasn’t been live tackling. He’s getting a lot of mental reps and things like that. He’s still kind of a game-time decision.” One player who definitely won’t play Saturday is cornerback Mark Webb. The converted receiver suffered torn cartilage)in his right knee in practice on Tuesday and underwent arthroscopic surgery on Thursday. However, he should be available to compete in preseason camp in August, or earlier. “Mark had a torn meniscus and he won’t be able to play in the spring game,” Smart said after the Bulldogs’ 14th practice. … We’re expecting a full recovery. He should be back.” Webb had been moving up the ranks in the secondary and appeared poised to contend for a starting position at cornerback. Instead, the Bulldogs are down to just 10 defensive backs overall. Georgia is also going to be without freshman early enrollee Divaad Wilson, who suffered an ACL tear the first week of spring practice, and safety Jarvis Wilson, who has a sprained foot. Sophomore William Poole may have to switch back-and-forth between the Red and Black squads on Saturday in order to preserve competitive balance. Godwin is the leading returning receiver from last year. He had 639 yards and scored six touchdowns, including one via a fairly miraculous catch at Notre Dame Stadium. Swift averaged 7.6 yards a carry and scored three touchdowns while playing behind Nick Chubb and Sony Michel as a freshman last season. He finished with 618 yards and was also the Bulldogs’ leading receiver out of the backfield with 17 catches for 153 yards and one score. The post Some key Georgia players may be missing for G-Day appeared first on DawgNation.
  • ATHENS — New Georgia basketball coach Tom Crean has finally pulled the trigger on naming a second assistant basketball coach. Joe Scott, most recently an assistant coach at Holy Cross, sports 16 seasons of head coaching experience at three Division I schools. He joins Chad Dollar on the Bulldogs’ staff. “I’m excited to welcome Joe, Leah, Ben and Jack to our Georgia Basketball family and the entire UGA community,” Crean said in a statement released by the school. “Joe is known nationally as someone who excels at coaching, teaching and competing. He has tremendous respect of his peers who have gone against him and those who have worked along side him. He will bring many different elements to our program, but overall and he will help our young men get better every day.” Said Scott, also in a statement: “My family and I are extremely excited to be joining the Georgia family. The University of Georgia is a special place. This is a tremendous opportunity to help Coach Crean implement his vision and make Georgia Basketball special. I cannot wait to get started coaching our players to develop and get better every day.” Scott was tabbed one of the nation’s top-20 “Xs & Os” coaches in a survey of his peers by ESPN’s Jeff Goodman in 2013. He was head coach at Air Force for four seasons, Princeton for three campaigns and Denver for nine seasons. He also has served as an assistant coach at Monmouth, Princeton and Holy Cross. All told, Scott sports 27 years of collegiate coaching experience. Before breaking into the head coaching ranks, Scott was an assistant coach at Monmouth during the 1991-92 season and at Princeton from 1992-2000. While at Princeton, Scott helped the Tigers to five consecutive postseason appearances, with trips to the 1996, 1997 and 1998 NCAA Tournaments and the 1999 and 2000 NITs. The Tigers won three Ivy League titles from 1996-98, including perfect 14-0 records in the final two seasons. Princeton upset defending national champion UCLA in the 1996 NCAA Tournament and ranked as high as No. 7 nationally in 1998 en route to earning a No. 5 seed in the NCAA Tournament, the highest ever for an Ivy League team. The post Georgia’s Tom Crean finally settles on a second assistant coach appeared first on DawgNation.
  • ATHENS — Georgia held their final actual practice of the spring at the Woodruff Practice Complex on Thursday. Under clear skies and relatively cool temperatures, the Bulldogs were working out in shorts and helmets and were scheduled to for about two hours. The next time they get together and play as a team will be during G-Day Saturday at Sanford Stadium (4 p.m., ESPN, News 95.5 and AM 750 WSB). Actually, it will as two teams. UGA on Thursday released its split rosters for the Red and Black squads for Saturday’s intrasquad game. This year, Georgia’s No. 1 offense, led by quarterback Jake Fromm, will be the Red team. The Black Squad will be led by the Bulldogs’ No. 1 defensive unit — and freshman quarterback Justin Fields, of course. Fromm’s Red squad will be protected by the first-string offensive line — which included both Solomon Kindley and Kendall Baker to play left guard. It will also feature juniors Elijah Holyfield and Brian Herrien at tailback and Terry Godwin, Riley Ridley and Mecole Hardman at wideout and Isaac Nauta and Charlie Woerner at tight end. Fields’ No. 2 offensive unit will have walkons Prather Hudson and Ian Donald-McIntyre in the backfield and will feature a receiving corps of Ahkil Crumpton, J.J. Holloman, Kearis Jackson, Matt Landers and Tyler Simmons. Of course, the Black team will be hanging its hat on a defensive team led by Tyler Clark, DaQuan Hawkins-Muckle, Jonathan Ledbetter, Julian Rochester and Malik Herring and inside linebackers Juwan Taylor, Tae Crowder and Nate McBride. D’Andre Walker, Robert Beal and Walter Grant will man the outside linebacker positions. The secondary for the Black squad has Deandre Baker and Tyrique McGhee at the corners, William Poole at star and J.R. Reed and Richard LeCounte III at the safeties. Meanwhile, the Bulldogs appeared to be going through normal drill work and play-polish in the early portions of practice on Thursday. Following are a few observations: Senior Terry Godwin was going through regular drill work with the receivers but appeared to be a bit gimpy in doing so. He had a reinforced brace on one knee and a regular sleeve on the other. Cornerback Mark Webb was not practicing after suffering a knee injury of undisclosed severity on Tuesday. Indications are it’s not a “major” injury. D’Andre Swift was going through bag drills with the running backs and did not exhibit noticeable limitations. He is dealing with a groin injury, according to coach Kirby Smart. Defensive tackle Michael Barnett (knee) was not at practice again, assuring that he’ll miss G-Day. Justin Young, who missed practices last week due to a minor knee sprain, has been able to practice and might be able to play. One area lacking depth that has not been much discussed is deep snapper for special teams. The Bulldogs technically have just one on the roster in redshirt freshman Oren Morgan of Toombs County. But senior fullback Nick Moore also snaps to the kickers. Former tailbacks Nick Chubb and Sony Michel were watching Thursday’s practice from the sideline and having a good time commenting on what they say. Asked which tailback they expected to be the leading rusher for the G-Day Game on Saturday, they simultaneously said “Prather Hudson.” Hudson is a redshirt sophomore walkon from Columbus. Recently-matriculated receiver Javon Wims was also at practice watching his position group. All of them plan to attend on Saturday, with Chubb conducting an autograph-signing at the bookstore.   The post Practice report: Jake Fromm to lead Red against Justin Field’s Black squad on G-Day appeared first on DawgNation.
  • Welcome to a feature on DawgNation, where our writers answer (or try to answer) the best questions submitted by Georgia fans. If you’d like to submit a question, please e-mail us at ugaquestionoftheday@gmail.com. Look for the Question of the Day every Monday through Friday Dear DawgNation: What is up with Nate McBride? —  James McConnell, Chickamauga What’s up with Nate McBride, you ask? Lots of things are up with the linebacker from Vidalia. First off, he’s up in class. He’s a legitimate sophomore academically, even though he’s still in his first year at UGA. He’s also up in age and experience, as well as strength and size. And while he’s up, he’s also down. Not mentally, but physically. Lee Chomskis (pronounced HOM-skiss), his coach at Vidalia High, said McBride is down to about 218 pounds after playing last season at Georgia at 225 and his senior year at Vidalia at almost 230 pounds. That said, having had a year under his belt with strength and conditioning coach Scott Sinclair, he looks a bit different physically. Not necessarily thinner, but certainly more cut. But reading between the words of your brief, one-line question, I suppose that’s not exactly what you meant by, “what’s up with McBride?” You probably are wondering, like a few folks I’ve heard from, why we aren’t hearing more about him. Why isn’t he creating more buzz and why isn’t he a starting linebacker for Georgia already? That’s what people often wonder when a former blue-chip prospect of McBride’s ilk — he was the No. 2-rated inside linebacker in the country at one point — is not starring by his second year on campus. A couple of points here: McBride is not even all the way to his second year at Georgia yet; two, we don’t fully know exactly what McBride’s role is going to be on the defense in 2018. We do know that he is competing with Monty Rice, Juwan Taylor and Jaden Hunter for the Will linebacker position manned so well last season by Roquan Smith. Though early signs point to Rice leading that competition, nothing is written in stone — or even on paper — and there is a long way to go before that’s decided. We also know that McBride has the size and skills to earn playing time at the Mike, the other inside linebacker spot in Georgia’s defense, and that the Bulldogs desperately need help at both spots in 2018. Regardless of how those competitions turn out, you’re still bound to see a lot of McBride this season, just like we did last season. In fact, while playing on several of Georgia’s special teams units McBride was one of just six true freshmen to play in all 15 of the Bulldogs’ games. The others were Jake Fromm, Andrew Thomas, D’Andre Swift, Walter Grant and Malik Herring. Rice played in 14. So you can bet that the swift-footed McBride will be on the field at least for special teams, if not also in a defensive role. He has one of the traits that coach Kirby Smart covets most — speed — as his four Class AA sprint championships as a high school senior attest. To date, I haven’t had a chance to ask Smart about McBride. But I reached out to Chomkis, who communicates with him on a regular basis, for a little insight. “He played on a team that played for the national championship,” Chomkis said. “That means there’s a lot of talent there at Georgia. He could’ve gone to Vanderbilt or Missouri and started every game, but he wanted to play for championships. I think he’s running with the 2s or 3s right now during the spring, and that’s because he’s still learning the position and having to think a lot. “But I think he’s an outstanding kid and an outstanding football player and I think he’ll play a lot for Georgia before it’s over. He has good size and great speed and that’s why they recruited him, because he can run so well. He can flat fly, and I’m not sure that there’s many that can run with him.” That pretty much sums it up. As Smart and the Bulldogs like to say this year, he “ain’t going nowhere.” Have a question for beat writer Chip Towers? E-mail us at ugaquestionoftheday@gmail.com The post ‘What’s up’ with Georgia linebacker Nate McBride? appeared first on DawgNation.
  • ATHENS — Really, we don’t know all that much about Georgia’s Monty Rice. But you have to like what the sophomore linebacker has to say about the enormous challenge that’s before him and the Bulldogs’ entire defense in succeeding Roquan Smith and that star-studded unit of a season ago. “We can’t live off what Roquan did, or Lorenzo [Carter] did, or Dom Sanders did,” said Rice, who is poised to follow Smith at the Will inside linebacker position. “What’s Juwan Taylor gonna do? What’s Nate McBride gonna do? What’s Monty Rice gonna do? We’ve got to live off what we’re going to do. We can’t dwell on last year’s success.” Monty Rice Truer words have not been spoken this spring about Georgia’s defense. The Bulldogs lost a boatload of exceptional football talent off last season’s 13-2, No. 2-ranked team. That fact will be underscored in the NFL draft next week. Most notable among those departures is Smith. The Butkus Award-winning linebacker is expected to be an early first-round draft choice. The battle to replace him is ongoing. But the odds-on favorite to handle that considerable task is Rice, who is really kind of a mystery man. If you don’t follow recruiting closely, you might need a refresher. Rice sort of just showed up at Georgia. Rivals and 247Sports pegged him as a 3-star recruit, but his offer list said otherwise. He had upwards of 20 offers, including pretty much the whole of the SEC. Rice actually committed to LSU (over Auburn and Georgia) in mid-December 2016. It’s something he now says was an act of confused desperation. But, as an early enrollee, he’d long been pursued by Mel Tucker, first at Alabama and then as defensive coordinator at Georgia. In the end, Rice pursued that relationship and simply enrolled at UGA without signing a letter of intent, according to his high school coach. “When he announced that day that he was going to go to LSU, me and everyone else going in thought it was going to be Georgia, just because of his relationship with Coach Tucker and Coach [Kirby] Smart,” said Wade Waldrop, Rice’s coach at James Clemens High School in Madison, Ala. “They already knew him, because he had visited Alabama a number of times throughout his sophomore and junior years, so they were familiar with him. “He came out right away and said, ‘I think I made a mistake.’ I said, ‘That’s all right. You haven’t signed a thing. As long as you let Coach [Dave] Aranda and Coach O [LSU coach Ed Oregeron] know, you do what’s best for you. You’ve got to wake up in that dorm room every day.’ ” Said Rice: “I just followed my heart.” Rice’s arrival in Athens in January 2017 has been a blessing both for the Bulldogs and for Rice. As a freshman last season he played in 14 of Georgia’s 15 games and even got a start against Missouri in the season’s seventh game. He finished with 22 tackles and 2 tackles for loss. The one start came at Mike linebacker alongside Smith after Natrez Patrick was suspended and Reggie Carter was injured. But he primarily as a Will — or weakside linebacker — which happened to be the position manned by Smith. So it was difficult to get on the field much with the defense. His work came mostly at “garbage time” and on special teams. But Rice said last season’s experience was invaluable to him, if for no other reason than getting to know Smith and watching how he worked. “Roquan is not a selfish person,” Rice said. “He was helping me out when I first got here, telling me what calls I had to make, telling me what to do or whatever. So he was real helpful. So was Lorenzo and Davin [Bellamy] and all of those guys.” As for motivation, Rice doesn’t need a lot of help in that department. This is a young man who has had his sights set not only on major college football but the NFL for a long time. That’s what distinguished Rice at James Clemens High. Originally from Huntsville, Ala., he actually lived with another family in Madison while playing there. The reason for that was two-fold. One, he wanted to play high school football at the highest level possible; and, two, he needed to escape the crime and poverty that ravaged the community in which he was raised. That ended up being a move made in heaven. Not only was Rice wildly successful as a player — he recorded 137 tackles, 4 interceptions and 4 touchdowns to lead the Jets to the Class 7A quarterfinals as a senior — but also as a student. “Monty Rice is a football player,” Waldrop said. “He came to school every day — and he had a 3.2, 3.1 GPA — and he did well in school because he wanted to play football. Everything he does is to play football. A lot of people, it’s the other way around. He did what he had to do on a daily basis to be a big-time football player. You didn’t have to hold things over his head to get him to do something. He loves playing football.” It’s not all about money and fame for Rice, either. He hopes football can give him a platform to call attention to a cause that is very personal to him: excessive force used by police, particularly against victims suffering from mental illness. You can read about it yourself from the pinned tweet at the top of Rice’s Twitter account, @RiceMonty. It takes you to a Facebook page dedicated to telling the story of Horaesheo Rice, a cousin eight years Rice’s senior who was killed by police gunfire on Sept. 20, 2017. That was the Wednesday before the Bulldogs would play Mississippi State in Sanford Stadium. Rice has his cousin’s name tattooed on his right forearm as a reminder of what he’s playing for. “I know he’s looking down and smiling about what I’m doing,” Rice said Thursday night after Georgia’s 13th practice of the spring. “We used to live together, so I was real close to him. I’m not a big social media guy, but I don’t want his name to ever be forgotten. I don’t want what happened to be, ah, this is just another killer. I want it to be known what happened to my cousin.” So, yes, Rice is supremely motivated. And apparently he’s a pretty good player, too. At this point there’s still no guarantees that Rice will be the undisputed starter and/or primary player at Georgia’s all-important Will linebacker spot. Among others, he’s competing with senior Juwan Taylor and fellow sophomore Nate McBride, not to mention two freshmen who will join the team in June. But indications are that No. 32 has been making a name for himself at that spot during spring practice. “He’s pretty difficult,” sophomore tackle Andrew Thomas said of trying to block Rice. “He has one speed. He’s, like, full-going all the time and he’s going to hit you. He doesn’t care if you’re bigger than him, he’s going to strike you and try to make a play. He’s making us all better.” That this one-time 3-star prospect is in position to become a full-time starter at a marquee position in his sophomore year may come as a surprise to a lot of people. But not to those in Madison and Huntsville who have known Rice for a while. “I’m absolutely not surprised, because he’s driven,” said Waldrop, who visited with Rice shortly before spring practice began. “He has a purpose. The purpose of just trying to start is probably big for him. He’s got NFL aspirations. He knows if he does the things that Coach Smart and Coach [Glenn] Schumann and those guys tell him to do and he buys into it, he knows he’ll have a shot to one day go get money.” And perhaps draw greater attention to a cause that is dear to him. We’ll have to wait and see how it goes on the football field, but for now we have an idea of what Monty Rice is all about. The post Georgia’s Monty Rice: Linebacker with a cause appeared first on DawgNation.