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Latest from Allen Tibbetts

    “Always wear clean underwear. You never know when you might be in an accident, and you don’t want people in the emergency room seeing you in dirty underwear.” - Your mom or someone like her.  ‘Twas the day before Thanksgiving, and I was in the emergency room.   I had been golfing that day and couldn’t shake the uneasiness in my chest, so I quit halfway through the round and headed for the hospital.   Quick background: This had happened before. Seven years ago, I left the golf course, went to the emergency room and was invited to stay for a triple bypass. So I’ve got history. And trust me, that kind of history heaps a whole lot o’ paranoia on you when things start feeling squirrely in your chest.   I will say this: seven years ago, I was given an additional indicator something was amiss. That hot day in July, after finishing my round, I cracked open a cold beer and never took a sip.   There’s your sign.   Now, here I was again.   In the emergency room, the first thing that happens is a check of your pulse and blood pressure. My pulse was fine, but my blood pressure sent a message to Houston: We have a problem.   I’m not a guy that ever fights BP problems, but it was through-the-roof high. And that little piece of news was going to buy me an extended stay to ‘check on things.’   “Let’s get you into a hospital gown,” said the nurse. Oh, yeah… cute nurse. About age 30. Because when you’re a guy in your 60’s and you wind up in the hospital, you’re never gonna get the dude nurse who looks like he might have stayed up all night binge-watching Game Of Thrones and eating nachos. You’re getting the cute, young nurse.   And she’s just asked you to take off your clothes.   This is where UPS sets in. And it ain’t about nobody getting a delivery. (Though you could argue it involves a package.)   UPS = Underwear Panic Syndrome.   It’s real.   Underwear Panic Syndrome is that sinking feeling an older guy gets when the cute, young nurse is going to see his underwear, and he has no idea which pair he has on.   Let’s face it, y’all, we all have underwear that should have found the trash can a long time back. It’s got holes, it’s got a shot elastic band, it’s got (whispering…) stains! You know what I’m talking about here.   To further expound on UPS, here’s some info you didn’t ask for, but I’m a briefs guy. Always have been.   I get that briefs are not particularly cool, but neither am I. With briefs, I get the one thing I demand from my underwear: support for the troops.   Let’s keep everybody together. Nobody needs to be wandering off.   (For the record, briefs used to be cool. Google images of ‘Jim Palmer underwear.’)   In college, I experimented with a few things. One of those was boxers, because a lot of my friends wore boxers. I spent those few days doing a whole lot of… um, adjusting.   As I have lived my life and observed a few things, I’ve never regretted staying with briefs. I’ve said it before, I’ll say it again. Women aren’t the only ones affected by gravity.   At one point in my morning radio show career, I had a mid-20s, male co-host who wore boxers. Because we’re boys, I suppose, underwear was a frequent topic of discussion. Our female partner was proud to proclaim her preference for going commando, so she mostly just refereed our briefs vs boxers arguments.   “You’ll regret boxers,” I would warn him. “Your knees will have playmates when you’re older.”   One day, he texted me from the local YMCA. He had just finished a workout and while in the locker room had encountered a much older man, shaving in front of the lavatory mirror. Nude.   My cohort had just seen his future. And I have never received a text containing so many exclamation points.   He now wears boxer briefs.   And maybe that should be my direction. Boxer briefs tend to keep all the eggs in the basket, as some of us prefer, and are probably considered cooler than briefs. Again though, I’ve experimented and still prefer briefs.   The UPS I suffered the day before Thanksgiving wasn’t as much about just wearing briefs as it was about the color of briefs I might have on.   Underwear multi-packs usually contain various colors: black, gray, blue, red, even white can be included. (Never brown, though. Wonder why? Especially for men of a certain age.)   I rarely wear the white ones, usually opting for another color. But what if I was wearing the blue ones? They’re not a manly dark blue. They’re a baby blue. Carolina blue. Might as well be tighty-whities, really.   As I unbuckled my belt to drop my drawers, I secretly prayed: please no blue, please no blue.   Ta da! Black! Yes!   But they were still briefs, and I still felt some pangs of shame.   To wrap up the hospital story, my blood pressure had gotten whacked out (I had wa-a-a-y overdone salty foods the day before), and I was released 24 hours later after extensive testing determined my heart is actually in excellent condition.   But comfortably back home, I’m thinking I need an undies upgrade. Maybe buy some boxer briefs to keep in the truck. Next time I take myself to the hospital, I can do a quick-change before walking into the emergency room to announce that I may be having a heart attack.   When the cute nurse tells me to undress, she will still see an older man with a ponchy belly, large love handles, a developing turkey neck and gray, thinning hair, but she’ll see I still got style.   She won’t say it out loud, but she’ll be thinking, “Hey, cool undies.”   Winner, winner, chicken dinner, old man!   You take your little victories whenever they come.
  • Just returned from a trip that included a few days in New York City. It wasn’t my first time. We were there just two years ago, so I knew I was getting in to. I love/hate that place.    The over-the-top weirdness of Time Square. Visiting the M&M store and paying $14 a pound for peanut M’s that would cost about $3 at my local grocery store. A truly unintelligible subway system. The fabulous – use your ‘jazz hands…’ fab-u-louus - Broadway shows.    It’s like no other place. It’s also like no other place should aspire to be, really. Especially the subway trains. The subway system there was designed by chimpanzees who then hired kindergarteners to draw the maps and legends explaining it.    Locals eventually figure it out by osmosis; visitors have no chance.    The way we handle the trains is to wander around in the subway station looking lost until someone takes pity on us and helps.    Mostly, we just walk. We certainly don’t attempt to drive in that carnival.    If you do drive in NYC, you need to be fluent in ‘horn.’ It’s the official language of drivers there.    But here’s what I’ve figured out: Honkers are almost always several cars back in the pack.    The first car in line has stopped because it’s illegal to run over pedestrians. The second car can see what’s going on so sits quietly. Get back to about the fourth or fifth car and all they know is that the light is green and they ain’t moving.    *beeeeeep*    Honking changes nothing, but I reckon it gives the drivers a way to vent their frustration of being in a city where a billion people live and having to deal with another billion visitors who know it’s illegal for you to run over them with your car and will therefore cross the street whenever they dang well want, traffic lights be damned.    The other language of New York City is every other language in the world. Except English.    Look, I’m a bumkin in The City, but I’m telling you, it was rare to hear English conversationally spoken. On the streets, in the subways, in the bars (so I’m told), on the elevators, the conversations were almost always in a foreign language.    That’s more observation than complaint.    To start with, we all know that as a country we’ve become heavily reliant on immigrants for service work. The servers, dishwashers, attendants, hotel staff… the list is endless of jobs immigrants are willing to do for the opportunity to live in the States.    Now, couple that with all the foreign visitors who are simply making NYC one of their must-do destinations, and there’s a whole lot of no speak-y English going on.    What if, I thought… what if we passed a law that required everyone in an American city to speak only English. That would probably cut down on the crowds since so many people would have to learn the language instead of relying on a single interpreter to be the English voice for their entire bus.    Then there’s a possible downside. What if that law not only required English, but required the proper use of the language?    That would shut most Americans out of places like New York City.    So, let me just say this, y’all. I ain’t never gonna go back to that place. Not never, not no how. I don’t know what them farners are sayin’, an’ until them people done learned how to tawk like me, I’d just a-soon stay home.    Somebody fetch me a beer.
  • Just heard a song from Dan + Shay called ‘Tequila.’ Wow, a song about tequila. How novel! While that oozes sarcasm, it’s a decent song, and so adds to an every-growing list of odes to a cactus. Off the top of my head, I can probably name 9 or 10 songs about tequila. There are more, I know. Many more. Almost all songs about tequila involve drinking too much. From there, we work on secondary themes, like being lonesome, drinking away a memory or doing something stupid. Tequila songs can also involve a fair amount of promiscuity. “Who is this cowboyWho's sleepin' beside me?He's awful cute, but how'd IGet his shirt on?I had to much Tequila last night.”  - ‘Jose Cuervo,’ sung by Shelly West Anyway… Hello, everybody, and welcome to TEQUILA TALK. As your host, you should know I fancy myself a tequila aficionado (I drink it), a tequila snob (I like the good stuff), and I may be the only person you’ve ever met that has never gotten sick from drinking it. Like, ever. Full disclosure: Oh yeah, I’ve overdone it. I’ve just never overdone it on tequila. And I’ll let my sainthood stop right there. Tequila gets a bad rap, and it’s not to blame. Its smooth, sometimes smoky goodness is a delicious sip, either neat or over a little ice. There are two main problems we have with tequila. First, we’ve made it a barroom game to see how much of it we can drink before we puke. Secondly, and a contributor to the first point, barroom tequila shots are usually done with a low-grade product. While anything calling itself tequila must, by law, contain at least 51% distilled blue agave, that leaves the other 49% to be distilled from something else. That’s very often corn syrup. And in these cheaper tequilas that nice golden color comes not from barrel aging, it comes from caramel coloring. I’m not hating on Cuervo Gold, y’all. Despite it being made from a whole lot of sugar and only minimally-required blue agave, it doesn’t taste bad. But even folks who think it does taste bad are willing to toss a few down so we can part-a-a-a-y!!! I’ll be worshiping at the porcelain alter later, but right now I have never been funnier, prettier, wittier or danced better! The girl who cuts my hair told me she can’t drink tequila. And why? “Well, one night…” …and we all know the rest of that story. Her drink of choice is vodka. Have you ever, I asked, sat down with some friends and slammed shots of cheap vodka down your throat until you went blind? Still, it’s hard to deny tequila has rendered some fun tunes. An all-time favorite became Pee Wee Herman’s dance groove: ‘Tequila’ by The Champs. In fact, that one may be the top tequila song of all time because of Pee Wee’s signature dance – let’s face it, tequila can lead to some pretty stupid dance moves – and because it’s easy to sing. The lyrical content of the song is a total of three words, and they are all ‘tequila!’ Speaking of lyrical content, Joe Nichols had a #1 hit with ‘Tequila Makes Her Clothes Fall Off.’ Given its title, I’m not sure why it needed any lyrics. Seems fairly self-explanatory. Click here for more Tales From Tibby!
  • Did you see the recent news story from New Jersey about the woman turned away from a flight because of her emotional support animal? In case you didn’t, the woman had been told in advance by United Airlines that she could not bring her emotional support animal onboard because they couldn’t accommodate the peacock. A peacock, y’all! Her emotional support animal was a feakin’ peacock! She showed up for the flight anyway. With the peacock. Access denied. Most of us watching or reading that story probably rolled our eyes and gave whoever else was around that look. You know the look.  ‘Really?!’ Also known as the ‘is she on crack?’ look. This story originally was going to be about her and others like her, people with emotional support animals (ESA). Specifically, people with unconventional emotional support animals. People wanting to fly with pets has gotten so whacky that Delta has just updated it’s ESA policy, saying, “Customers have attempted to fly with comfort turkeys, gliding possums known as sugar gliders, snakes, spiders and more...” I had planned to write about the peacock lady. I wanted to write: Ma’am, number one, that peacock don’t care about your emotions. And number two, I’m betting you’re single. Then, a couple of things happened.  First, another ESA story emerged involving an emotional-support dog that attacked a passenger on a plane. In this case, though, the dog was a veteran’s ESA. That a veteran is part of the story gave me pause enough. (Gave me pause… get it? Pause… paws… OK, not that funny). Even putting that aside, though, if you’ve ever owned a good dog, you know that dog does indeed care about your emotions.  So, what do I do? Leave out people with dogs? The other incident derailing my original story involves a donkey. On my walk past a nearby farm just this week, I stopped and asked the young woman shoveling out the barn what happened to the white horse that had been there for years. “The white horse died, but we may get another one. That white horse and the donkey were close. The donkey is really lonesome.” What? “When we buried the horse, the donkey stood nearby and watched the whole thing. It was like she was at a graveside service.” The woman spoke of it all very matter-of-factly, like a seasoned farm hand would. On the farm, when a large animal dies, you take your backhoe or whatever implement you have to dig a hole, you dig that hole, then push the animal in and cover it up. The facts of life. She spoke just as stoically about the donkey’s loneliness. No emotion, just ‘yeah… the donkey’s lost her buddy. We may have to do something about that.’ But if a donkey can have an ESA, I knew my story idea-in-the-making, poking fun of people with emotional support animals, was going south quickly. So, I’ve decided to change gears. Let’s look instead at what other animals might make a good ESA. Like, a turkey. If you ever breakdown emotionally and need a meal, voila! And after eating the turkey, you could be thankful. (Thankful… turkey… Thanksgiving…? Is funny still not happening here?) How about a fish? Imagine, a friend comes over. She needs to unload her troubles, so you dutifully sit and listen as she drones on, endlessly. And you finally say, “Why don’t you kiss my bass.” But you mean it. What a friend! How ‘bout a bumblebee? Maybe all you need to pick you up is a little buzz. Speak of buzz, what about a buzzard? If you’re a particularly deep person, a buzzard could pick your brain. (And any other parts. Once you’re gone, of course.) Feel free to offer your own thoughts. There’s gotta be plenty of other animals that would make ESAs. I’m sure you’ve heard about the (true story) incident recently involving a lady with an emotional-support hamster? After being told she couldn’t have it onboard a Spirit Airlines flight, she flushed it down the toilet. You can Google up the details, if you want. It’s a weird story. But I have to wonder what kind of person relies on a hamster for emotional support. I doubt that hamster cared about her emotions. I bet she’s single. Click here for more Tales From Tibby!  
  • I’m not sure when ‘The Season’ begins. Is it Thanksgiving into Christmas, then into New Years? Or do we back it up to Halloween? Halloween into Thanksgiving into Christmas into New Years? And why do we say ‘new years’ like there are several of them? All I know is I eat a lot in ‘The Season.’ I’ve made pecan pies before, but making them this year was different. For some reason, this year I paid attention to what actually goes into making a pecan pie. It may be because I’m trying (in vain) to reverse the slow trend of becoming a slightly larger person every year. I’m still trying to get my brain wrapped around this notion that what I put in my mouth has some direct correlation to the size of my midsection. So... pecan pie: -syrup-sugar That’s your pie: liquid sugar, granular sugar. The sugars need something to hold them together, so let’s toss in a few eggs. Of course there are pecans, but it could be anything. Want a peanut pie? Walnut pie? Use dill chips and it becomes a pickle pie. The point is, we’ve named the pecan pie not after the mainingredients but after the only healthy ingredient in the thing. Rightfully, it should be called a sugar pie. “Oh, you’re making sugar pies for the holidays? Do you do anything special?” “Well, I like to top mine off with pecans. Adds a little crunch to the sugar.” Years ago, I made a ‘dark’ version of pecan pie. Instead of a light corn syrup, I used molasses. Instead of white sugar, I used dark brown sugar. I called it Pecan Mud Pie. I should have called it Pootie Pie. It hung around for days in unfavorable ways. Pecan pie is hard to turn down, especially if you know the reputation of the person or restaurant that is offering it. Once you become known for making a good pecan pie, you are considered an excellent cook for anything else you make. You could prepare an entire meal from canned food, nuke it in the microwave and serve it on plastic plates, and it would be the best meal ever. Because we’re all just waiting on your delicious pecan pie at the end of the meal. My pies this year were a failure. While they looked good coming out of the oven, apparently, I did something wrong. Serving them was serving a soupy, syrupy mess. With pecans. They had good pecan pie flavor and got eaten (with spoons), but I doubt I will be asked to make them again for the family gathering. I’m OK with that. Maybe it’s just to discourage myself from eating something that will only make me a little rounder in the middle, but next time I’m serving pecan pie, I’m gonna call it like I see it. “Alright now, I’m serving diabetes for dessert. Who wants Cool Whip on theirs?”
  • Kids like gross. Always have. Toy makers know this and have been delivering gross toys for decades. Garbage Pail Kids, Burp Balls, Queasy Bake Oven…. do a search for ‘gross toys’ and you’ll find not only the toys currently vying for your kids’ attention, you may also find what appealed to you as a child. Anyone remember making creepy crawlers? Then eating them? Seems like Santa Claus himself brought that one to my childhood house. With no children of our own, our home these days is generally gross-free. (Pay no attention to anything my wife might say about me and Mexican food.) But kids occasionally show up, and the ones we see most frequently know my wife and I are gamers. Ping pong, basketball, board games… we’re usually all in for whatever challenge gets thrown at us. And that brings us to Bean Boozled. For those not familiar with this game, allow me to introduce you. I’ll call it a board game but if it has a board, I’ve never seen it. It does have a spinner. And jelly beans. What could go wrong? The rules, as explained to us by the kids, are simple: Flick the spinner and whatever color it lands on, you eat a jelly bean of corresponding color. That’s it. You now know how to play Bean Boozled. When you eat up all the jelly beans, refill bags are available at places like Cracker Barrel. That’s how wholesome the game is. Except… Each color jelly bean can have one of two flavors. One of those flavors is tasty; the other, not so much. That brown jelly bean might indeed taste like chocolate pudding. But it might taste like canned dog food. The white jelly bean? Could be coconut, could be sour milk. I will attest that while I don’t really know what some of the gross flavors taste like (slimy socks?), they’ve done a pretty good job with replicating the taste of sour milk! My wife and I weren’t the only adult players, but we hung in there longer than the others. One of them got a booger-flavored bean and dropped out immediately. My wife grabbed a trash can after her first bad bean. She was willing to keep going but prepared to unload any further undesirable flavors. She didn’t last long. I became a case study for stupidity. Not only did I hang in there until I had tasted all the flavors, good and bad, but when asked to play again the next night, I agreed. My wife declined. So did the friend who went down on his first bean. “Tasted boogers all night,” was his excuse. Nasty. Which of course is why kids love it.
  • Let’s jump right in. Today’s gripe: Moms who put bows on their babies’ heads. I seriously don’t get this. Every single girl child that pops up on my social media feed has a bow on her head. What’s going on here? Trying to make your baby look like… Dumbo? Minnie Mouse? A rabbit? I have a niece claiming that just as with big hair, the bigger the bow, the closer to Jesus. Yeah, we say that in that South, but it’s only because bad style needs an excuse, if you ask me. A random baby that may or may not be family.   Not only is this a silly trend, some of y’all have pretty rotten tastes in bows.* Somebody needed to say that. What you see in those pictures is your little angel looking so precious. What I see is trouble looming. So let me just go ahead and prepare you for the conversation your surly teenage daughter is going to have with you in about 17 years: “Can I ask why you ruined all my baby pictures by wrapping my head up like you were going to give it away for Christmas?”“Can I get a tattoo? What do mean, you think it will make me look silly? Didn’t seem to bother you when I was a baby.” “What’s with that bow? Had Wal-Mart run out of pretty ones or was Dollar General having a sale?” I have another question. All of the babies I see have known fathers. Where are the fathers? Why are the dads not stepping up and saying something? Be a man! Assert yourself! Or at least claim half ownership of rights to decorating the baby’s head and take the bow off. I’ve never had children but I can assure you if my wife wanted to put a bow on Dumpling’s head, we’d be striking a deal. 'Sure, you can put a bow on her head if I never have to do poopy-diaper duty again for the rest of eternity.' Something like that. I’m a b-a-a-a-d man! Oh, I can feel your eyes rolling, moms. I know what you’re thinking. ‘Grumpy old man.’ But I know what you’re really doing. You’re trying to mask your baby’s fat head.  Look, that’s just the facts of life. Most babies’ heads are too big for their bodies when they are born. What happened to just saying a ‘bless her heart’ and knowing she would grow into it eventually? Has anyone considered that a fat-headed baby with a bow only makes fat-headed baby’s head look bigger? Moms, trust me on this. Do your baby a favor. Buck the trend. #saynotothebow (You can steal that; I stole your baby’s picture.) No need to thank me. Just doing what I can to make you a better parent. Heaven knows, y’all need help. *No specific accusations are intended for the babies pictured in this story. Although if the shoe fits…
  • It was something, the eclipse. Especially to be in the path of totality where the moon would completely block the sun for a few moments. The stars had aligned for us. And we were ready. Plans had been in the works for months. One neighbor had ripped off some images from the internet and designed t-shirts celebrating the event. Another neighbor had purchased moonpies and sun chips for snacks. There was beer. About the only issue facing us was where to see it. In our area, watching the eclipse start to finish would take about 3 hours and options on where to see the sky for that amount of time were limited. The few houses that make up our community are in a deep valley, heavily wooded, and a lot of the neighborhood only gets sunshine filtered through the oaks, maples and tall white pine trees surrounding us. The day before the eclipse, several neighbors wandered up and down the lone dirt road that connects us and determined that the cabin on the end offered the best viewing from both the lower porch and in river itself. Sitting in the river is where many of us wanted to be. More planning. A small tree would be harvested. It would be wedged between the rocks in the river so that floats could be attached. Further, the river was shallow enough at this spot that chairs could be put in the water. Bonus: this cabin had a refrigerator in the basement. Those sitting on the porch didn’t have to walk very far to fetch and toss beers to those in the water. The neck on this event was getting redder by the minute. Everything went exactly according to plan. The sky was blue, the day was warm, the water was cool. And man, down in our valley where we have limited sunshine to begin with, when totality came, it got dark! Perfect. Except… Many had gathered in the water a good hour or so prior to the start of the eclipse. The event had come and gone, and people were still in the water. Happy people, lounging in their chairs and tubes. And there was beer. We were into about the 4th hour of the party when someone just had to point out that no one had taken a bathroom break. Here we are, lined up one behind the other in the water, and no one had stood up and announced that they would ‘be right back.’ No one had left the water to ‘take a break.’ We just sat in the river. And there was beer. These things go unspoken. Or should. But when someone speaks of it, smiles turn to sneers. Suspicious eyes are cast to everyone around. Further, in the last couple of hours two pairs of those cheap eclipse-viewing glasses had come floating by us, meaning someone we could not see was upstream from us. At least two people, based on the number of glasses. Were they also in the water? Did they also have beer? These are questions best unanswered. But the subject had been broached. Resolution became necessary. In the end, we all agreed none of us would never do anything like that. Despite being older men and women, our friendship was strong and our bladders stronger. Everything’s cool, everything’s OK. One day, when you and your children are visiting the loveliest place on God’s earth you’ve ever seen, and you happen upon a pristine little trout stream, gurgling its way over the rocks, tumbling merrily to a larger river somewhere, and Little Precious looks up at you and asks, “Can I take a drink from it?” Don’t be my dad. My dad said, “Sure. Why not?”
  • When you’re 14, you’re never going to be old. Until one day you are.  When you get older, the best you can hope for is to be cool - the cool mom or dad, the cool aunt or uncle - and hope the young'uns around you see Rico Suave instead of Ricky Ricardo (who would have turned 100 this year).   That’s not the way it works, of course, but it’s really all most of us have to hang a hat on. That and our increasingly shiny heads.   Part of the perception of cool in this digital world is the ability to keep up with the latest ‘thing.’ Or at least to be perceived as trying to keep up.   So, when my teenage companions suggested I needed to be on Snapchat, I surrendered my phone.   “Set it up.”   If you’re not familiar with Snapchat, my best and shortest description would be that it’s texting with pictures. There’s so much more to it, but that’s the basic function.   Further, unless you make a special effort to save a Snapchat, it disappears for good, typically after 10 seconds. There is a lot to like about that, especially if you are fond of sharing pictures of you doing stupid or illegal things (I’m guessing).   I suppose it’s because your chats disappear the Snapchat logo is a ghost. The ghost is actually a blank canvas. You can insert a photo of you or anything else in that space. I had chosen to do nothing, and it was not sitting well with the 16-year old beside me.   She suggested I needed an avatar. In digital-speak, an avatar is a digital representative of you.   Think of it as a personal emoji.   For example, take your basic smiley face emoji 😊. Now, give Smiley Face some of your features, like the same color hair, that same skin tone, your dimples, glasses, if you wear them, etc.   You’re basically creating a cartoon character in your likeness.   You bet there’s an app for that. Several, probably.   Let the games begin.   She would look at me, then look at her options for designing me. “You need a longer face,” she commented as she picked a template to make that happen.   “His nose isn’t long enough,” her brother offered, thus involving himself in the process.   It started getting personal. Really personal.   My wrinkles were discussed. Scars and moles were talked about. And I guess I had bloodshot eyes that day because the question, ‘can you make the whites of his eyes red?’ was asked.   Assigning my avatar white hair was a no-brainer, but they argued over which available option looked most like a guy going bald.   Ultimately, my avatar was finished. It's not easy seeing yourself through the eyes of a teenager, but I wasn’t too disappointed. Given that they were only creating my face, I avoided some other pitfalls common to men of a certain age:   -pot belly  -corroded toenails  -ear hair  -nose hair  -turkey neck  -baggy pants (‘cuz you got no butt)   I thought I got off pretty easy. The 14-year old thought his sister could have done a better job around my eyes.   “He’s got some pretty gnarly eyebrows.”   I do. And he will too one day. As we’re all fond of saying: There’s only one option to getting older, and you ain’t gonna like it much.   But I’m good with where I am in life. And I'm keeping busy by working on my own app, inspired by Snapchat. Since it will only work on teenagers, its working name is Teenzap.   Here's how it will work: use the app to take a photo of any teenager, and in 10 seconds, they will disappear.   Not the photo. In fact, you may want to keep the photo. It will be all that remains of that precious pimply face.   I'll keep you posted.
  • It’s a very special smehell. I made that word up. It's a cross between 'smell' and 'hell.'  We need a new word describing what it’s like walking into your house after your refrigerator/freezer has died and been left alone. Putrid, nauseous, toxic, oh my god, and liquid death don't get it done. Who knows how long it had been dead. It had been two weeks since we had been around. Neighbors discovered the problem. Ours is a close-knit community; everyone knows where everyone else keeps a spare key. If you don’t have something you need but your neighbor does, go get it. That’s how this started. I received a text that someone or something was dead in our house. “It’s not bad,” she wrote. “It’s really, really bad.” She could have – I think I probably would have – just walked out and left it for the homeowner to figure out what was wrong. Instead, she and her husband decided to do a little investigating. “Sniff the shower drain,” I suggested, thinking the septic tank might have a problem. By the way, you want to be pretty good friends with folks you suggest to go into your shower and sniff your drain. Profanities could follow. Looking for any obvious problems led them to eventually opening the refrigerator door. And immediately slamming it shut. It was a morgue in there. Actually, no. There was life. You know how your fridge has little vents? When motors aren't running and coolants aren't cooling, those vents become doorways for small creatures, hungry for a meal of spoiled, rotting food. There were bugs. Among the damage, a sealed pack of chicken that had swollen up and burst through the packaging. Same for the venison. Packs of ground deer meat had all breached the seals of their vacuum-packed plastic, warming to room temperature, oozing blood. Yogurt had burst the seals of their individual cups and grown hair. Whomp buscuits – those you whomp against the counter to open - had broken through without being whomped and were molding. And the bugs. It may have smelled like death, but certain unidentified insects were loving life: crawling, flying and feasting. Clearly, the refrigerator had not just conked out yesterday. Alien life forms of this magnitude take time to manifest. Public service announcement: Frozen okra will thaw into a gooey mess but will not explode through freezer bags. I’m not sure why you need that information, but now you have it. Hazmat was called but refused to respond. So, friends stepped in to do what friends must occasionally do. Once in a while, you gotta step up to the plate. First, all windows were opened. They found of couple of fans in our house, then brought a couple more of their own to prop up in those windows. This cancelled the plans of our immediate next-door neighbors to eat lunch out on their deck that day. While they are a good 30 yards away, the stench from our kitchen was uncontainable. Those folks had other options of where they could be, so they packed up and left. Like I said, it’s a real special odor. Neighbors from both sides of the house came with garbage bags, willing to help clean out the fridge. While tossing out our food, one of them tossed his own cookies. Fortunately, he managed to make it outside, hanging his head out over the deck railing before that happened. Ten full garbage bags and $5 later, the offending mess was deposited in the local dump. The same friend who had lost his lunch cleaning out the refrigerator was around when we finally arrived two days later, offering to help me move the refrigerator out of the house. To fortify ourselves, we both took a shot of tequila. (We do a fair amount of fortifying around here.) During the process of rolling it out on a hand truck, one of the fridge doors popped open. His tequila shot left his body as quickly as it had entered. We refortified. Eventually, we were able to wheel the refrigerator into my neighbor’s yard. The same neighbors that had left. Their yard. I used their hose, their water, to wash out meat juice and mold. Can’t wait for them to return. Precious memories aren’t the only things that linger. The fridge made nice yard art, and we considered just leaving it there. Back inside, my wife Beverly wiped down every counter and cabinet with all manner of cleaning solutions, going so far as to take down the curtains and wash them. Floors were mopped. Disinfectant was sprayed on the furniture. Plates, glasses, silverware, every pot and every pan got washed. In tossing out all of the spoils of the refrigerator, the neighbors had left glass and canned items. Without much hesitation, we made the decision to toss everything that smehell had touched and start over. Everything except the beer. It’s good beer, and the cans had not popped opened. I deemed them salvageable and safe. Now, you could argue that beer which has been refrigerated, then brought back to room temperature, then refrigerated again will lose some flavor. You’d need to argue with someone else. My palate won’t notice, and I ain’t listening. You could also argue, as my buddy did, beer cans that have been in such close proximity to the funk of rotting deer carcasses are contaminated and need to be replaced. But again, my ears don’t hear. Those cans have taken a gentle bleach bath and are now chillin’ in a brand new refrigerator. My friend has vowed not to accept my offer of a beer for the next year. Beverly has vowed that lips that touch those cans of beer will not touch hers for about the same period of time. Don’t tell me I don’t know what it means to sacrifice.
  • Allen  Tibbetts

    I’m a Georgia boy, born and bred.

    Born in Rome, my family didn’t live there long enough to ever know it as home. I spent my grade school years in Aragon, Georgia, before we moved to Tifton in South Georgia, the city I call my home town. A lot of my family still lives there.

    I started working radio as a junior in high school in Tifton at a little AM station, WTIF 1340. It was a weekend job in the beginning, but I somehow managed to parlay that gig into a 41-year career in radio, mostly as a morning show host - or co-host, as I almost always had a partner clowning around with me on the air.

    After almost 20 years of working radio in Tifton, I started dating the woman that is now my wife. We had gone to school together in Tifton, but she was living in Athens as we reconnected.

    Ah, Athens… home of the University of Georgia and the Georgia Bulldogs. Shouldn’t I live there, too?

    I sent an application to the only station I knew in Athens, 960 WRFC, and was hired as the morning show host in 1990. As the radio market evolved and stations in Athens merged, I was moved to the morning show at Magic 102.1/WGMG, an adult contemporary station.

    Best I can figure, I spent about 18 very happy years on that station before I turned off the mic.

    My wife, Beverly, was an entomologist who finished her professional career serving in administration at the university. When she decided to retire, I figured it was time to quit leaving her in bed alone at 4 a.m. every morning, and I retired, too.

    We still live in Athens, at least part-time, with no kids, no cats, no dogs, and no obligations other than to family and friends. We tend to wander around a lot.

    What are Tales from Tibby?? 

    During my 41-year career doing morning show radio, what I found most rewarding was taking the slices of life I observed and making them into fun, funny or satirical stories that, hopefully, the audience would enjoy. That usually involved altering, embellishing or flat-out lying about an actual incident, but I got pretty good at it. When the time came to back away from the microphone, I realized that I still tend to see life as a morning show host. My brain still processes everything as a possible story to tell on the air. So this blog is a written extension of my radio show, a series of true or semi-true stories could just as easily be called, THE WORLD ACCORDING TO ALLEN. Born and raised and still living in Georgia, my stories often have a Southern slant. I offer no apologies for that. I know how to properly prepare grits and cannot imagine life without them. I can also fry up a rabbit. While I cannot avoid a little commentary now and then, the aim is to entertain, and I hope you enjoy reading these Tales From Tibby.

    Read More

Local News

  • ATHENS, Ga. --- Twenty-nine University of Georgia student-athletes will receive undergraduate or graduate degrees Friday morning during the fall commencement exercises at Stegeman Coliseum.   Among the 29 UGA student-athlete graduates are nine from football; seven from track and field; three from baseball; two each from men’s golf and swimming; and one each from gymnastics, soccer, softball, volleyball and women’s basketball. In addition, three sports communications student assistants and one compliance student assistant will be receiving their degrees.   Baseball (3): Chase Adkins, General Business; Blake Cairnes, Consumer Economics; Mitchell Webb, Sport Management.   Football (10): Kendall Baker, Sociology; Michael Barnett, Communication Studies; Rodrigo Blankenship, Journalism; Lamont Gaillard, Sociology; J.R. Reed, Communication Studies; Keyon Richardson, Sociology; DeAngelo Tyson, Housing Management and Policy; Steven Van Tiflin, Real Estate and Finance; Nick Williams, Communication Studies; and Shakenneth Williams, Sociology.   Gymnastics (1): Gigi Marino, Human Development and Family Science.   Men’s golf (2): Zach Healy, Sport Management; Jaime Lopez Rivarola, Kinesiology.   Soccer (1): Delaney Fechalos, Finance.   Softball (1): Lindsey Miles, Early Childhood Education.   Swimming (2): Gunnar Bentz, Management; Stephanie Peters, Sport Management.   Track and field (7): Sarah Gardner, Kinesiology; Cejhae Greene, Consumer Economics; Addy Lippitt, Management; Anna Machovec, Computer Science; Chanice Porter, Kinesiology; Karl Saluri, Food Industry Marketing Administration; Kendal Williams, Communication Studies.   Volleyball (1): Sarah Lagler-Clark, Psychology.   Women’s basketball (1): Simone Costa, Communication Studies.
  • Jonathan Herbert gets 30 days in jail: the former teacher was arrested after biting the buttocks of a 14 year-old girl who was swimming in Lake Lanier this past July 4. Herbert, who lost his job as a Gwinnett County school teacher after the incident, was charged with sexual battery, child cruelty, and public drunkenness.  Gwinnett County School officials say Herbert was teacher at Snellville Middle School for two years. It's not the first time he's been accused of having too much to drink while out in a public place. Johnson found Gwinnett County jail records that show police arrested Herbert in May of 2016 on DUI and drug charges. Police said he was speeding and was in possession of marijuana.
  • The Discovery Channel says it will air a documentary on a December 2016 shooting in Franklin County: two Lavonia Police officers were shot and wounded after a traffic stop. The officers have since recovered; the suspect—wanted out of South Carolina—was arrested shortly after the shooting. The TV special on the shooting will air next Tuesday night at 10.  The two officers, Captain Michael Shulman and Officer Jeffrey Martin, were shot while conducting a traffic stop in a fast-food restaurant parking lot off I-85 in Lavonia. Shulman spent several days in the hospital as a result of the shooting. Both Shulman and Martin reovered from their injuries, and have since left the department. 
  • We go into the weekend with still no certification of the December 4 special election in Georgia House District 28, a contest that appears to have been won by former Banks County School Superintendent Chris Erwin by a mere two votes out of more than seven thousand ballots cast. If the results hold, Erwin will unseat incumbent Republican Dan Gasaway in the district that covers parts of Banks, Stephens, and Habersham counties. Representative Gasaway, who is from Homer, continues to talk about a legal challenge to the election. Either he or Erwin will represent the district in the legislative session that begins one month from today. 
  • Athens-Clarke County Police say the loaded gun found on a student at Cedar Shoals High School could be the same gun used in this week’s drive-by shootings, in which shots were fired into a home on Martin Court in Athens. The 15 year-old is being held at the Youth Detention Center in Gainesville.    Athens-Clarke County police spokesman Geof Gilland tells news outlets the teenager was arrested Wednesday after he was found with the gun authorities have linked to the two shootings. Police say a school resource officer found the gun in his backpack. Police did not identify the student. Authoriites say he was taken into custody at Cedar Shoals High on a charge of possessing a gun on school grounds and two aggravated assault counts.

Bulldog News

  • ATHENS — It’s nearly Christmas, I haven’t a gift under the tree, Georgia is about to resume football practice, I’m selling one house, building another, hauling things to storage and, lo and behold, there’s this relatively new thing called the early national signing period rumbling like a long, loud freight train about to pop out of a dark tunnel. Welcome to the winter holiday, folks, also known as College Football Never Stops. And, I know, you love it. I do, too. As I’m struggling to manage all these converging priorities in my life, I’m overwhelmed by all the subject matter that deserves to be weighed in on. Owing you and our beloved sponsors a Towers’ Take, I was left to reason I just need to touch on them all before plunging into a weekend that will include attending to all the aforementioned tasks, plus a little Georgia hoops action with the Bulldogs’ hosting their best opponent so far. Let’s start with the most popular subject — Georgia football recruiting. ‘The Closer’ There was the time I was The Atlanta Journal-Constutition‘s primary recruiting reporter. I know, I’m also glad that’s not the case anymore. As most surely know, DawgNation now employs one of the finest full-time “Recruitniks” in the business in Jeff Sentell to track the Bulldogs’ business. And nobody does a better job of keeping up not only with all the big developments — and there always seem to be big developments where Kirby Smart’s Bulldogs are concerned — but all the minutiae as well. I’m in position to get Sentell on the phone or exchange texts any time a thought or question enters my mind. It’s about this of year I realize what a blessing that is. So while I don’t write about recruiting a lot until the calendar turns to those significant signing dates or those blue-chippers are about to hea to campus, I keep up through Jeff and needle him for details every now and then. I have two thoughts on the Bulldogs’ recruiting as we head into this final weekend of what is really he most intense competition of all: One, it’s truly incredible the heights to which Smart and his staff have raised recruiting at Georgia in such short order. I hear people say he has the Bulldogs “closing in” on Nick Saban and Alabama in terms of the overall talent base of the program. Well, I say based on their last two on-field meetings, Georgia is already eye-to-eye with the Crimson Tide in terms of the pedigree of football players that are on the roster and the level of coaching and development they’re getting. Never mind, those last two results. When you’ve led or been tied with the team arguably the most dominant program in the history of the sport for 119 of 120 regulation minutes, you’re not overachieving with inferior products. You’re there, dude. And don’t start quibbling with me, Bama fans, over the number of No. 1 classes or national championship trophies your spoiled enterprise has harvested over the years. The fact is, you’re batting .500 at best with the Bulldogs over prospects you both want. And it’s clear Smart and his staff knows what to do with them when he gets them on campus. This new rivalry is not about to disappear like a morning fog. Smart is on your bumper and in your rearview like Dale Earnhardt in his NASCAR heyday, and it’s only a matter of time before he spins you out and takes the checkered flag. Of this I’m absolutely certain. Two, if this recruiting year finishes like it’s shaping to, Smart might go down as one of the greatest closers in recruiting history. They certainly won’t get them all (will they?), but the Bulldogs once again are in the hunt for some mighty big game right down to the 11th hour of this December signing period. And that’s the real difference nowadays. Georgia has always recruited well, as it should as the state school in one of the most fertile recruiting grounds in America. But the difference now is where the Bulldogs would regularly find themselves left at the altar on a major flip, it’s Georgia doing the flipping nowadays, and landing some major prospects in the process. That’s the case again this year as the Bulldogs sit with four 5-stars already committed and in the hunt on players that could drive that number again into the seven or eight range. That would, in turn, stock Georgia’s roster with as many 30 5-star prospects, or more than a third. Now a 5-star does not automatically a great football player make, but suffice it to say, you’ll take your chances on a prospect everybody in the country wanted over a diamond in the rough any day. Based on what I’m hearing, Georgia has a great shot at a lot of these final major targets. Wide receiver Jadon Haselwood was long committed to UGA and, other than the distant outpost of Oklahoma, his other finalists aren’t competing on the arc that the Bulldogs currently are. No team could have a greater need at inside linebacker than does Georgia, which is in it to win it on Mississippi 5-star Nakobe Dean. And with rumblings of comings and goings in the backfield, where else would any ambitious running back — such as IMG’s Trey Sanders — want to go besides UGA, which presently has three NFL starters within four years of their matriculation through Athens? And that’s to say nothing of Smart’s annual Transfer Treasure Trove. There are many others recruiting storylines that Sentell is tracking like an astronomer from a mountaintop observatory, so be sure follow him on Twitter and keep your DawgNation app notifications activated. And say this for Smart: He keeps us all intriqued to the last possible minute, and left wanting more. Next stop: Attrition Of course, the flipside to signing every 5-star within site of Hubble telescope is there’s not enough room in the orbit for everyone in the galaxy. So attrition is inevitable, and it seems as though that might be the case again this year. Now attrition takes place naturally in college football as it is. Some players can’t cut it academically, others realize on their own their getting buried on the depth chart, and medical DQs are as common as redshirts nowadays. Suffice it to say, there will need to be some movement for Georgia to make room for everybody it wants to join the “Burned Out on Bama” initiative. Some of that will sure come in the form of early NFL departures. The Bulldogs don’t have many (if any) sure things in terms of can’t-pass-on-such-money, underclassman draft prospects. But they do have several who, for varying reasons, might consider making the leap now. Running back Elijah Holyfield, receivers Mecole Hardman and Riley Ridley, tight end Isaac Nauta and safety J.R. Reed are among the Georgia underclassmen said to have asked the NFL for a draft evaluation. And sometimes what’s on that assessment is not the determining factor. Sometimes it’s just time to move on. And what’s to stop some of these degree-holding juniors from deciding to move on or transfer for a chance to play more or just to get on with their post-football lives? It’s the ever-turning life cycle of college football. And the way Smart works Georgia’s numbers, there’s rarely any wiggle-room. The Great 8 Debate There’s always what should be done, and what will done, isn’t there? Those of you who read me regularly or tune into my Marco’s Pizza Towers’ Take Live podcasts know I am and have always been a proponent of the 8-team playoff. It has always made the most sense to me, and apparently some member of the current College Football Playoff system feel the same way. Not surprisingly, big wigs from the Big 12 and Big Ten are losing patience with the exclusionary practices including only four teams in the playoff, and the selection committee’s penchant for playing fast and loose with their directive of choosing “the four best teams.” Wisconsin Athletic Director Barry Alvarez and Big 12 Commissioner Bob Bowlsby have provided some volume to the chorus of cries for expanding the field to eight teams. Too many worthy participants are getting left out, they say, even giving a nod to the American Athletic Conference’s undefeated darling of Central Florida. But their solution — eliminating conference championship games — is a bad one. And it’s unwinnable to boot. The SEC, as Commissioner Greg Sankey made plain, is never going to relinquish its wildly successful title match, as well it shouldn’t. I have long proposed a simpler solution, but it’s one that surely wouldn’t fly as it might actually take money off the table of Power 5 fat-cats. That is, eliminate one game from these ridiculous 12-game, regular-season schedules. I mean, really, must alums and donors not only pay to see Austin Peay and Middle Tennessee, but ALSO UMass in the same season? Heck, I could even justify cutting back to 10 games in favor of an expanded playoff, which would only increase by one week, if they’re truly concerned about the number of games these “student-athletes” are playing, which they’re not (see college basketball, baseball, tennis, swimming, track, you name it). No, they won’t do it because, in Georgia’s case, it’d be losing $3.5 million annually from one-game’s revenue. I’m of the mind that could easily be recouped from the TV money generated by an expanded playoff (a la the NCAA Basketball Tournament). But that’s the hangup you’re going to hear from administrators, the Bulldogs’ included. That, and you’re not going to be able to help out these poor middling football programs anymore, which we all know is the ultimate end-game. No, I think they should make conference champions a requirement of the five “Group of Five” (they prefer that name) participants, and then take three at-larges. Those could be somebody like this year’s Bulldogs, who everybody believes were among the country’s best four teams at the end of the season, and/or an undefeated mid-major like UCF. Yes, there will still be arguments about the ninth and 10th teams being deserving, but that will always be the case, just like it is with all those bubble teams for the 65-team basketball tournament. And so what if an occasional four-loss team upsets its way into the playoff. It made for a pretty good story for Bainbridge High School in Georgia this year, don’t you think? And while I’m fixing things, go ahead and put UCF and Notre Dame into the 10-team Big 12 Conference. Or put the Irish in the Big Ten or ACC where they belong and add USF to the Big 12. Do something with Notre Dame, or just leave them being subjected to the yearly scrutiny required for the at-large group. It’s really simple when you think about it, but only if money isn’t central to the equation. OK, that’s it for me. I’ve got to do some shopping and packing.   The post Your holiday 3-pack: Kirby the Closer, running down Bama and solving the Great 8 Debate appeared first on DawgNation.
  • ATHENS — Nine months after being named Georgia’s basketball coach, Tom Crean is still campaigning hard for his new program. The Bulldogs (5-3) are getting ready to play host to Arizona State at Stegeman Coliseum, the first of a set of four tough games for the remainder of December. He knows his fledgling, young team is going to need all the help it can get against the No. 20-ranked Sun Devils (7-1), and Crean is a big believer in big crowds being a big help.           The trouble is, UGA just broke for the holiday. Fall semester exams wrapped up on Wednesday and most of the school’s 30,000 students have abandoned campus.           But that hasn’t deterred Crean. Ever the optimistic salesman, he’s stumping for a packed house for Saturday evening’s 6 p.m. tilt. “It’s important we get a sellout crowd; that’s real important to help energize us,” Crean said before the Bulldogs practiced Thursday morning. “If you beat Arizona State you’re doing something, because they’re good. They’re going to win a ton of games. They’re a legit team, if not the front-runner to win that league (Pac-12). … It’s extremely important, no doubt about it. We’re playing an outstanding team.”           That they are. The Sun Devils, who are expected to contend for the Pac-12 title this season, just lost for the first time all season and were impressive even in defeat. They led No. 6-ranked Nevada by 15 points in the first half and by 12 at halftime before finally succumbing to the Wolf Pack 72-66 in a game at the Staples Center in Los Angeles. As has been the case in nearly every game this season, Arizona State was led by dynamic freshman Lugunentz Dort. The 6-foot-4 freshman guard, who averages 22 a game, had 24 against Nevada, a team many are expecting to play deep into March.           Georgia doesn’t harbor such expectations right at this minute. The Bulldogs have wilted in the face of their most intense challenges to date. They offered little resistance to 16th-ranked Clemson (64-49) and Georgia State (91-67) in the final two rounds of the Cayman Islands Classic and got down by a bunch quickly before rallying to put a scare in Temple on the road (81-77).           But those games all took place out of town. The Bulldogs are home for four of the next six, starting with the Sun Devils, and home is where the W’s reside.           While it always is and will be about the team that takes the floor, Crean believes a great atmosphere can help good teams play great.           “It’s something we’ve been addressing since March 15th,” said Crean, who is 4-0 at The Steg so far. “We’ve got to have a tremendous crowd. If we’re going to build this program to where everybody wants it to be and recruit the way everybody wants us to recruit and the way we want to recruit, the atmosphere of games has to be phenomenal. It’s not just how great the music is and how wonderful the band and the cheerleaders and the dance squads are — they are. We’ve got to have people there. We’ve got to have it loud.”           So Crean is not above creating any sort of promotion to get butts in the seats. Saturday is no exception. It’s “Tacky Christmas Sweater” Night. Fans are welcomed to wear their own tacky Christmas sweaters to the game, but the first 1,000 spectators to show up will get a free tacky Christmas sweater T-shirt.           Crean brought one of the T-shirts with him to this Thursday’s press conference to discuss the Arizona State game. “I don’t think I’ll wear one, but I like it,” he said. “Very, very creative. I’ve seen some ugly Christmas sweaters before. This one’s pretty cool.”           The gimmicks are fun, but Crean knows better than anybody his squad has to play better and beat some quality opponents to keep folks coming back. Beating a team of the ilk of Arizona State would be great first step.           To do that, Georgia’s has clean up its game. Averaging nearly 17 turnovers a game, the Bulldogs can start by taking better care of the basketball. Crean also is looking for improved offensive rebounding, better free throw shooting and less fouling.           All those traits need to be present against the Sun Devils, who are averaging 14 offensive rebounds and 29 free throws a night. Controlling Dort will, of course, be a key. A Top 30 national recruit from Montreal (who spent two years playing basketball in Florida), it was Arizona State coach Bobby Hurley who beat out several basketball powerhouses for Dort’s services.           The freshman hasn’t disappointed. Equally adept at shooting 3s or driving to the basket, Dort had a 33-point game against Utah State and has scored 24 points or more in half the Sun Devils’ game. Built like a football player, he’s an equally effective on-the-ball defender.           “He’s a solid player,” said Georgia sophomore Nicolas Claxton, who is the only SEC player to lead his team in points, rebounds, assists, blocks and steals. “We’ve game-planned for him. We know he’s going to come in here and play hard. They’ll be a strong test but we’ll be ready for them.”           It won’t be easy for the Bulldogs to be sharp. Saturday will be 12 days since their last game due to final exams. But Crean has been working them hard in practice, particularly this week as testing concluded midweek.           After consecutive days of what players characterized as “very intense” practices and scrimmages, the Bulldogs are ready to play somebody else. Their hope is that their fan base will also be ready on Saturday as well.           Georgia traditionally has drawn pretty good crowds to Stegeman for SEC play, which annually begins after the New Year. But due in part to the excitement of Crean’s hire and his boundless promotional presence, the Bulldogs already have established a school record by selling out three regular-season games before the season even started. They’ve since added two more sellouts to the ledger, giving UGA its most capacity crowds for men’s basketball since the 2002-03 season.           And Georgia is drawing pretty well early on this season. It has averaged 7,240 in the four games so far, including 9,018 for the season opener against Savannah State. That was most for a UGA home opener since Dominique Wilkins’ sophomore season in 1981.           The Bulldogs could use a good, strong representation on Saturday as well. Crean believes it can make a difference. “There’s no question (Stegeman) can be a tremendously tough place to play with 10½-thousand in there and the acoustics the way that they are,” Crean said. “We’ve just got to put people in there. There’s been a lot of tickets sold. … But if we want the level of program we want here, we’ve got to have great crowds.”           The post             WATCH: Tom Crean urges Georgia fans to pack The Steg on Saturday for No. 20 Arizona State appeared first on             DawgNation.          
  • ATHENS, Ga. --- Twenty-nine University of Georgia student-athletes will receive undergraduate or graduate degrees Friday morning during the fall commencement exercises at Stegeman Coliseum.   Among the 29 UGA student-athlete graduates are nine from football; seven from track and field; three from baseball; two each from men’s golf and swimming; and one each from gymnastics, soccer, softball, volleyball and women’s basketball. In addition, three sports communications student assistants and one compliance student assistant will be receiving their degrees.   Baseball (3): Chase Adkins, General Business; Blake Cairnes, Consumer Economics; Mitchell Webb, Sport Management.   Football (10): Kendall Baker, Sociology; Michael Barnett, Communication Studies; Rodrigo Blankenship, Journalism; Lamont Gaillard, Sociology; J.R. Reed, Communication Studies; Keyon Richardson, Sociology; DeAngelo Tyson, Housing Management and Policy; Steven Van Tiflin, Real Estate and Finance; Nick Williams, Communication Studies; and Shakenneth Williams, Sociology.   Gymnastics (1): Gigi Marino, Human Development and Family Science.   Men’s golf (2): Zach Healy, Sport Management; Jaime Lopez Rivarola, Kinesiology.   Soccer (1): Delaney Fechalos, Finance.   Softball (1): Lindsey Miles, Early Childhood Education.   Swimming (2): Gunnar Bentz, Management; Stephanie Peters, Sport Management.   Track and field (7): Sarah Gardner, Kinesiology; Cejhae Greene, Consumer Economics; Addy Lippitt, Management; Anna Machovec, Computer Science; Chanice Porter, Kinesiology; Karl Saluri, Food Industry Marketing Administration; Kendal Williams, Communication Studies.   Volleyball (1): Sarah Lagler-Clark, Psychology.   Women’s basketball (1): Simone Costa, Communication Studies.
  • ATHENS – Isaiah Wilson always has been a man of few words. And when it comes to his play on Georgia’s offensive line this season, he has been a man of no words. Technically, Georgia’s “no freshman interviews” policy doesn’t apply to him, being a redshirt freshman and all. Nevertheless, despite starting every game for the Bulldogs at right tackle this season, Wilson hasn’t been made available to talk, even upon request. Isaiah Wilson started every game and played more than 95 percent of the snaps at right tackle this season. (Curtis Compton/AJC) That’s probably just as well for Wilson. He has never been a big talker anyway, even when he was the biggest thing around growing up in Brooklyn, N.Y. And when Wilson was finally in position to talk after the SEC Championship, he didn’t feel much like it. Understandably, Wilson didn’t have much to say during postgame interviews following the Bulldogs’ 35-28 loss to Alabama. The 6-foot-7, 345-pound offensive lineman was a big part of staking Georgia to a two-score lead late in the third quarter in that game. A half-hour after that dramatic conclusion unfolded, Wilson was still a bit dumbfounded about what had just transpired. “I just hope we get another shot at them,” Wilson said of Alabama. “If we do, I know we’ll play our hearts out and hopefully the outcome will be different.” Georgia will surely get another shot the Crimson Tide; it just won’t be this season. The No. 5-ranked Bulldogs (11-2) were, of course, passed over for a spot in the College Football Playoff. They will instead face the No. 15-ranked Texas Longhorns (9-4) in the Allstate Sugar Bowl on New Year’s Day in New Orleans (8:45 p.m.; TV/radio: ESPN/WSB 750-AM, 95.5 FM). Wilson didn’t know that at the time he was being queried. The Bulldogs have been off for final exams since that fateful day in Mercedes-Benz Stadium. But they’ll be back on the field this weekend. Several of Georgia’s seniors will go through graduation ceremonies on Friday, and the team will return to Woodruff Practice Fields for closed practices on Friday and Saturday. UGA’s Sugar Bowl media day will be conducted on Monday, at which time we’ll hear from the players and coach Kirby Smart again. Wilson likely won’t be available on Monday either, but he has already made quite a statement with his play on the field this season. A year after being deemed incapable of helping the Bulldogs even in a bit role as a true freshman, the former top 3 national recruit not only started every game his second season, but he played more than 95 percent of the snaps at right tackle. To this, Wilson offered only a humble reply. “I just try to get better every day,” he said. “So, when it’s the next practice, I just try to get better than I was the day before. You just keep going from there.” That Wilson is an everyday starter is not a surprise. He was a consensus 5-star prospect and Top 5 nationally-ranked tackle coming out of Poly Prep Country Day School in New York. The bigger surprise was that it took some time. But it took Wilson a while to get acclimated, both to the football and to the Southern heat. Showing up in Athens at more than 350 pounds, Wilson struggled with Georgia’s humidity in preseason camp his first season and spent a lot of time on the sideline being treating for heat exhaustion. “I was gasping for air at times,” Wilson said last year before the Rose Bowl. “But I’ve adjusted to it well now.” Getting acclimated to the heat gave Wilson the chance to concentrate on the fundamentals of being a good SEC offensive lineman. And he had a long way to go in that regard. Playing prep-school ball in New York, Wilson rarely encountered an opponent who contend with his massive size. Going against Georgia’s No. 1 defense as a redshirt helped him hone those skills. “I’m better in every aspect,” he said. Georgia coach Kirby Smart agrees. “He’s grown. He’s getting better,” Smart said in November. “I thought last year he got frustrated early and just kept working, spent some time on the scout team, got better. He still is a work in progress, just like our team is.” Wilson certainly has mastered the run-blocking aspect of his job. Georgia led the SEC in rushing this past season and managed 163 yards and a touchdown against Alabama’s formidable front. Running back D’Andre Swift went over 1,000 yards this season and Elijah Holyfield needs just “I think it’s just a want-to for this offensive line,” he said of the Bulldogs’ ability to run the football. “We see our guys with the ball and we want to help them and push them further. Where Wilson is trying to get better is in the area of pass protection, and he has shown significant improvement there as well. “He plays physical. He’s a big man,” Smart said. “He’s worked hard to get better. He’s held up against some tough guys in pass pro. I think he takes pride in that. … So he’ll keep working, and hopefully he’ll keep getting better.” The progress is evident, and not just from Wilson. The Bulldogs will lose only one starter off this year’s team in senior center Lamont Gaillard. The returnees, like Wilson, were mostly highly sought-after recruits. By the end of this season, opposing coaches talked about being “swallowed up” by Georgia’s massive offensive line. “It means a lot to hear them say our offensive line swallowed them up,” Wilson said, cracking a smile for just a moment. “I love my brothers on the offensive line. I’m happy that the offense is going well and that we’re physical and we’re all succeeding and playing well.” We’ll certainly be hearing more from Wilson in the future.   The post Isaiah Wilson a block of granite in Georgia Bulldogs’ offensive line appeared first on DawgNation.
  • The Georgia Bulldog football team, gearing up for the January 1 Sugar Bowl game against the Texas Longhorns, is set to start practice.  From UGA Sports Communications... Friday, Dec. 14 – Closed practice with no media availability    Saturday, Dec. 15 – Closed practice with no media availability   Sunday, Dec. 16 – players off   Monday, Dec. 17 – 11:15 am – Coach Smart press conference (team meeting room on 1st floor); 11:40 am – select players available on second floor lobby *TBA periods open for viewing; no post-practice interviews   Tuesday, Dec. 18 – Closed practice with no media availability   Wednesday, Dec. 19 – 11:45 am – Signing day press conference with Coach Smart (team meeting room on 1st floor) *TBA periods open for viewing; Coach Smart post practice   Thursday, Dec. 20 – TBA periods open for viewing; select defensive players available post practice   Friday, Dec. 21 – TBA periods open for viewing; select offensive players available post practice   Saturday, Dec. 22 – Closed practice with no media availability