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Tales from Tibby

    Kip Moore grew up in my back yard. I do not know him. If you’re unfamiliar with Kip Moore, he’s a country singer. Not the biggest name in country music, but he is known – actually, admired - for having a large, loyal fan base.   In Tifton, GA, the house I grew up in and the house Kip grew up in have adjoining back yards. Walk out my back door, cross the yard and walk into his back door.   You can still do that, but you won’t find him or me in those houses anymore except to visit our parents.   In years past, I made that trek a couple of times because his late father was a teaching golf pro and tried his best to make me a better golfer. Didn’t work, but I knew his dad well and met all the kids, including Kip, I’m sure.   Since Kip is a full generation younger than me, he would have been a wee lad at the time.   WHERE IS THIS GOING?   We were in McMinnville, TN, recently to attend a concert in a cave. McMinnville is home to Cumberland Caverns and a concert hall that is 333 feet below the surface called the Volcano Room.   A favorite singer/songwriter was playing the Volcano Room.   As part of our visit, we did a pre-concert tour of the caverns. Our guide for the tour was a young lady that I’m guessing was in her early 20s. According to her, one of the perks of being a guide was getting to ‘work’ the concerts, meeting and hearing all the cool artists that pass through.   “Who’s your favorite you’ve seen so far?” I asked.   Kip Moore.   “He was so good and so nice!”   Y’all ready for this?   “Fun fact,” I tell her, “Kip grew up in my back yard.”   I then go on to be specific with the facts: I was friends with his dad but because of the age difference, I didn’t know Kip. But yeah, his mom still lives there and my family still lives there, and I figure one day, he’ll be home and I’ll be home, and we’ll probably have a beer together.   She seemed to think that was pretty cool.   I’m not sure what happened in the next two hours that included the concert we were there to see, but after the show, one of the cavern workers literally chased me down.   “I hear you know Kip Moore!”   Somehow, the game of Rumors had gone full circle. Telling someone Kip grew up near me had fermented into the fine wine of us being pals.   At this point, I simply capitulated on explanations. She was star-struck, and I neither wanted to bust her bubble nor take the time to go into details – again.   “Yeah, he grew up in my back yard.”   She gushed. About how good he was, how he played an extra hour more than scheduled, how he treated the fans as if they were his best friends.   She spoke to me though her words would probably reach Kip.   I grinned and nodded a lot, playing the hand I was dealt: friend of Kip Moore.   So, Kip, my apologies. I totally used you to play the fame card. I owe you a beer.   Since it seems unlikely you’ll be home at the same time I am, I’ll leave beer money with your mom next time through the home place.   Enjoy.
  • I accidentally pulled off a masterpiece of a scam.  With another friend joining us, my wife Beverly and I headed to horse country in Kentucky.   Somewhere just across the Kentucky state line I realized I had left my billfold at home. Some people would be upset about that. Not me.   No billfold meant no driving and no paying for anything. Four days of someone else taking care of everything. It’s was a thing of beauty!   Sorta.   Part of our journey was to catch the last day of the spring horse racing season at Keeneland race track just outside of Lexington. Bev and I had visited that beautiful facility before and had vowed to return one day to bet on the horses.   So there we were. But with no money of my own, I was what’s referred to in tax lingo as ‘a dependent.’ And somebody wasn’t going to give me a lot of money to lose on the ponies.   Didn’t really matter. We’re not much for gambling and being only the second time at a race track, neither of us know much about how to bet on the horses.   That doesn’t mean I’ve never made money at the track, though.   Gather ‘round, children for a sadly true story that will leave you shaking your head and probably liking me a little less.   Dateline: Ruidoso Downs/Ruidoso, New Mexico   I had never been to a betting track for horses but was intrigued and somehow convinced our group to spend an afternoon there.   It was a blistering hot day, to the point of being miserable. Probably because of that, the crowd was light and payouts were pretty small.   Compounding the misery, roughly halfway through the day’s races none of us were winning any of the $2 bets we were making.   But I remember this well:   Race #6 had just concluded, and I had concluded it was time to lose a beer, so I went to the boy’s room.   Standing at the urinal, I noticed all the disappointment laying on the floor. Apparently, people holding losing tickets as they hit the restroom simply dropped them on the floor when it was time to hold something else.   The ticket right at my feet caught my eye. It was for the #6 race just run, and it appeared someone had picked a winning trifecta.   In case it needs explaining, a trifecta is a bet on three horses to finish in the top three. A straight trifecta means you pick specific horses to finish 1st, 2nd, & 3rd. That can be a pretty handsome payoff..   This ticket was a trifecta box, meaning the bettor had picked the top three finishers but in no particular order. It’s a popular bet because it allows leeway for the order in which your top three picks finish.   The downside of the box is that it doesn’t pay out as well as a straight. But it’s still a win.   Finishing my own business, I bent down to take a closer look at the ticket.   Horses #2, 3 and 8. That’s what I remembered as the top three in the just-completed race. I’m guessing it had fallen out of somebody’s pocket.   Now, you can only imagine what the men’s room floor is like underneath a row of urinals. It ain’t pretty and it ain’t dry.   I didn’t touch it, instead stepping outside to double-check the numbers on the board and confirm the winning horses.   Yup, that was them.   I thought about it a few moments, taking into consideration that it was a ‘box’ so the payoff was not going to be all that rich, especially on a day when there’s weren’t many patrons attending the races.   What I really hoped was that the original owner would come back to the bathroom to see if he could find his lost ticket. I would show him where it was and see how he handled it. But as a couple of minutes passed, the ticket just laid there.   Taunting me.   Free money… Money just laying there… Waiting on some fool to rescue it from its sea of nastiness.   Yeah, I did.   I grabbed a couple of paper towels, picked it up and took it to the sink, rinsing it off before patting it as dry as possible with more paper towels.   Then I washed my hands. I washed my hands 40 times, then I washed them again. There simply was not enough soap to wash off the shame of my deed.   But whatcha gonna do? Leave a winning ticket laying there?   I finally determined my hands and the ticket were clean as they were going to get, and I headed to the window to collect my payoff.   To the window clerk I explained the wet ticket as the result of my excitement of having won, spilling my drink during the celebration.   She smiled politely and handed me my winnings. $36.   I didn’t tell anyone in our group about it until we were in the car and on the way back to our house. Everyone was pretty grossed out. Especially, my poor wife.   But poor because she didn’t win no money! Loser!!   Although, it can be argued that I was the loser. To this day, she still doesn’t like holding hands with me. For more Tales from Tibby, click here. 
  • In an early scene of the 1990 Julia Roberts/Richard Gere movie Pretty Woman, there’s a dude walking the streets asking people, “What’s your dream?”   Or as he says, “wha’s yo’ dream? Everybody gotta have a dream!”    I admire people who have a dream, a plan. It’s likely going to change but to have a goal is a good thing.    Graduating from high school, my goal was ___.    That’s a blank space.    College? I’ll go because isn’t that what you’re supposed to do?    Whatcha gonna study, boy?    No clue. #manwithoutaplan    That, by the way, makes for a poorly-motivated student.    By the time I started college I was working full-time at a radio station, but it didn’t seem like career stuff. It felt like something I could do until my real job sent me an invitation with a bottle of champagne and a signing bonus.    Since one shall not find what one does not seek, a real job never materialized, forcing me to continue my pretend job.    I did enjoy radio and worked hard at it, but it took a long time for me to believe this was going to be my career work. I remember thinking, man, if I can just do this thing until I’m about 35, I’ll have it all figured out by then.    No, I wouldn’t have. By the time I hit my mid-30s I started figuring some things out, but by then I had decided to ride that radio pony until it threw me off.    Further, I had dropped out of college because radio was way more fun. So if radio had fallen through, I would have ___.    That’s another blank space.    These kids today…    #1) An 18-year old I randomly met, headed off to college soon.    “Whatcha gonna study?”    She wants to be an actress. If that doesn’t pan out, she thinks being a doctor in a trauma ward has appeal.    Why a trauma ward?    “You know, when a chandelier falls and pierces your body, I’d be there to help you.”    Yeah, right. Unless you’re performing the exact same surgery on Grey’s Anatomy, which I suspect is the only place such a surgery would ever be necessary.    #2) My 11-year old niece wants to know if she can live with us when she attends the University of Georgia.    “Whatcha gonna study?”    She wants to be either a veterinarian or study culinary arts.    Being the guy I am, I suggested she do both. Her failures as a vet could yield some tasty offerings at suppertime.    She wasn’t amused, but I dismissed that as her not understanding the high level of sophistication in my humor. Click here for more Tales from Tibby.
  • There was a day last week designated as National Moonshine Day. You’d think after all these years I’d know there was such a thing.  That same day was also National Gingerbread Day, National Running Day, and National Veggie Burger Day.   Nobody seems to know how National Moonshine day was assigned, but I’m guessing someone came across the day honoring running, gingerbread and veggie burgers and decided it was a date that needed something good going for it. I’ve only experienced true made-in-the woods kinda ‘shine a couple of times in my life.   Probably the best-tasting stuff was provided by my neighbor, Frank. Frank had been a mayor and a state representative and was a good ol’ boy with lots of good ol’ boy friends.   One of his friends was a judge in a tiny North Georgia town who had a still.   A judge. The same guy who sentenced bootleggers was one.   Frank claimed the judge wasn’t a bootlegger because he didn’t sell it, only gave it out to trusted friends.   That’s a finer point of the law I don’t know, so I didn’t judge. As the Good Book says, judge not lest ye be judged by a judge with the keys to a jail cell and the authority to put your a** in it.   My favorite moonshine memory is Ernest.   Ernest was a care-taker on a friend’s family farm in rural South Georgia. He was an affable, older gentleman who was friends with everyone.   Ernest’s job was tending the farm. He mowed, did light repairs and fed dogs.   And there were dogs.   The remote location of the farm made it an easy spot to drop off an unwanted dog, so strays were always showing up. Ernest and the family he worked for were quite happy to welcome those orphan hounds.   Ernest was easy to like. Whether or not he ever knew my name, he knew I was on the radio. Whenever I accompanied my friend to the farm, he’d flash that big jovial grin and say, “There comes the radio man!”   I don’t recall ever going to the farm when Ernest didn’t have his big cast-iron kettle of corn mash is some stage of preparation out in the yard behind his trailer.   One cool fall night, three of us high school buddies decided we’d grab a couple of six packs (drinking age was 18), head to the farm and build a fire.   Since the old farmhouse and Ernest’s trailer shared a yard, Ernest came to join us. He didn’t want our company as much as he wanted our beer.   His offer: a gallon of his corn mash in exchange for a 6-pack of what was very likely Schlitz Malt Liquor back then.   Judge not. We were young with undeveloped taste buds.   We accepted the offer and a gallon jug of Ernest’s fire water soon began circling the fire pit.   If you want to know how this saga ended, you’ll need to ask one of my other buddies.   I’m pretty sure that night I determined one of those stray dogs was a camel and rode him to Egypt. Click here for more Tales From Tibby. 
  • This needs a quick preface so it won’t come off as snooty.  We have no children. Therefore, no grandchildren. And no pets. Like everybody else, we occasionally spend a little money on things we probably shouldn’t but unlike y’all with kids and pets, we spend on things that don’t pout or poop.   For me, there’s something magical about the $100 price tag. Once an item crosses the $100 threshold, it’s officially expensive and that must be pointed out.   I was serving apple pie to neighbors recently and drizzled an aged balsamic vinegar on it, vinegar that had been brought back from Italy and cost…?   Yep, about $100. And I told them so. In defense of my spending so much for a tiny bottle of balsamic, it happened at a wine tasting that might have lasted just a wee bit too long. That same tasting also lead to the purchase of a $100 bottle of olive oil before my wife asked to ‘borrow’ my credit card then hid it.   But why did I need to point out the cost to my guests? Why not try to impress them with the fact that it was 30-year old balsamic - from Italy! - and leave it at that?   ‘Cause it cost a hun’erd dollars, that’s why. If I’m serving you a hun’erd dollar balsamic, you’re going to hear about it.   I’d probably do the same thing if I was serving you a $100 bottle of wine, but don’t hold your breath on that one. In our house, it’s likely the wine I’m serving you is only $2.99. For the whole bottle.   It would be a fair question to ask why I’m willing to spend $100 on olive oil but cheap-out on wine.   I think it has to do with longevity. I’ll have that oil and balsamic for some time to come, enjoying it along the way. Wine won’t make it past bedtime.   Once wine is opened, it evaporates or something. Maybe it grows legs and walks off, but it gets gone. If it’s expensive wine, at the end of the evening you’ve just plowed through a hun’erd dollar bill with nothing to show for it but a dopey grin on your face.   That’s not to say I would never pay up for good spirits. I have spent a few coins for good bourbon, though I have stopped chasing the ones that have gotten stupid expensive. There are some tasty whiskies and bourbons that are quite affordable once you get your nose out of the air and into a glass.   A cousin posted this for me to see. That is good stuff, but in my town if a store has any of this available at all, the store paid $30 for it. Thirty. That’s a ‘3’ with one ‘0’ attached. If they can get $200 for it, fine, but it ain’t coming from me.   With that proclamation though, I must confess to a recent bout of liquor lunacy.   A friend who knows I often find decent prices online for these things asked if I could find a particular tequila that was $100 in the store.   I did find a better price, though by the time you added in shipping it was $96/bottle.   Hey, $4 saved.   I was somewhat familiar with this tequila, having brought a bottle of it back from Mexico many years ago. I didn’t remember a thing about how it tasted, but at $100 it had to be good, right? So I figured I should also get a bottle for myself.   “Wait a minute,” he says. “I have a friend who might want a bottle, too. Before you order, let me check.”   I knew exactly what was happening. He was asking his friend (wife) if he could just go ahead and buy a second bottle while we were ordering.   Sure enough, he tells me his friend wanted a bottle, so I decided if he could get one for his friend, I could order one for my friend. So, the order was doubled to four bottles.   Turns out, he actually had a friend who wanted a bottle. I didn’t. But I now have two big bottles of expensive tequila, and one small problem.   I don’t care for it. Neither does my imaginary friend.   I cracked open a bottle for me and a buddy - after bragging that it cost $100, of course. We took a couple of sips and just sorta stared at each other with that look. The look that says, “um…. paid how much?“   And yay! There’s a whole ‘nother bottle!   Anybody need tequila? It’s a real purdy bottle. It even comes with instructions on how to turn it into a vase once it’s empty. (Spoiler alert: take the cap off and put flowers in it.)   I’m willing to let it go for a hun’erd dollar bill. I’ll even throw in $4 in change. 
  • If you haven’t been paying attention to the news, there’s a collard crisis underway. Not making this up. The cultivar Southerners crave this time of year is in serious short supply.  Blame the elements. In the Southeast, too much rain has flooded fields. California collards are the victims of wildfires, either too much scarring from blowing ash or too much smoke to harvest ‘em.   For me, none of this is particularly bad news. I hate collards.   Every year I seem to find myself in the company of friends and/or family who want that traditional New Year’s Day meal of collards, cornbread, black-eyed peas and ham.   Each of those foods supposedly represents something, though I have no idea what it is. Except for collards. Because they’re green, I think they represent money. Eat collards on the first day and you’ll enjoy prosperity throughout the entire new year.   I’d rather be poor. Collards taste nasty and give me gas.   I hate black-eyed peas, too, though I can tolerate them if I’ve got enough chow chow slopped on ‘em. (Chow chow is pickled something. In the South, usually cabbage or squash. Whatever it is, it’s mission is to mask the taste of the peas. Ketchup also works in a pinch.)   This is my own problem, I know. I’m a Southern boy with a Southern pedigree a mile long.  Having grown up with considerable exposure to three sets of great-grandparents, I learned things kids today aren’t allowed to learn or are simply not exposed to.   One grandfather was a sawmiller who taught me how to make a corncob pipe and smoke rabbit tobacco in it. His wife - grandmama - was a sturdy woman who dipped snuff and tried to teach me how to milk a cow. (I never learned. I was afraid I’d hurt the cow if I squeezed that thing too hard.)   Another grandpa raised chickens and cows and plowed his garden behind a mule while grandma was making stew from the snapping turtle her brother had killed and brought into the house, swingin’ it by the tail.   On my mom’s side, one great-grandfather was a preacher. A Baptist preacher. That’s an important Southern distinction. Wouldn’t be as meaningful if I had to identify him as Episcopalian. People might think we were drinkers. You know, whiskeypalians. And my elders did not drink. Had to learn to do that on my own.   I’ve skinned and consumed a hundred rabbits and squirrels and gnawed clean their bones. I can pick out a ripe melon by thumping it. And I can fry you up a mess of okra that will absolutely make you weep.   I shouldn’t have to prove my credentials as a Southerner, yet I’ve had a constant culinary clash with many of the foods beloved in the South.   It’s not just collards I don’t like, it’s turnip greens, mustard greens, rutabaga and virtually all peas and beans. (Except pork’n. I love me some pork’n beans. Probably because you gussy them up with brown sugar and bacon.)   I don’t like boiled peanuts, either.   Something’s wrong with my wiring. I much prefer Italian food to Southern fare. Given the choice of pizza or fried chicken…   Wait. Bad example. I’d definitely choose the fried chicken. And anything that taste like fried chicken. Frog legs, for example. Yum!   But I love Italian food the most. I’ve wondered if the doctor who delivered me was Italian. Or maybe he had just polished off a pizza and the first breathe I drew on this earth was a whiff of his breathe.   Adding insult to injury, the friend who prepares our collards every New Years Day is Italian. She claims what she cooks are Italian-style collards.   I don’t fight it, but I don’t buy it. If I cook up a possum with pepperoni, does that make it Italian-style possum?   Debate that while you eat your collards. If you can find any.   Personally, I’m hoping to catch a break this year.
  • “Always wear clean underwear. You never know when you might be in an accident, and you don’t want people in the emergency room seeing you in dirty underwear.” - Your mom or someone like her.  ‘Twas the day before Thanksgiving, and I was in the emergency room.   I had been golfing that day and couldn’t shake the uneasiness in my chest, so I quit halfway through the round and headed for the hospital.   Quick background: This had happened before. Seven years ago, I left the golf course, went to the emergency room and was invited to stay for a triple bypass. So I’ve got history. And trust me, that kind of history heaps a whole lot o’ paranoia on you when things start feeling squirrely in your chest.   I will say this: seven years ago, I was given an additional indicator something was amiss. That hot day in July, after finishing my round, I cracked open a cold beer and never took a sip.   There’s your sign.   Now, here I was again.   In the emergency room, the first thing that happens is a check of your pulse and blood pressure. My pulse was fine, but my blood pressure sent a message to Houston: We have a problem.   I’m not a guy that ever fights BP problems, but it was through-the-roof high. And that little piece of news was going to buy me an extended stay to ‘check on things.’   “Let’s get you into a hospital gown,” said the nurse. Oh, yeah… cute nurse. About age 30. Because when you’re a guy in your 60’s and you wind up in the hospital, you’re never gonna get the dude nurse who looks like he might have stayed up all night binge-watching Game Of Thrones and eating nachos. You’re getting the cute, young nurse.   And she’s just asked you to take off your clothes.   This is where UPS sets in. And it ain’t about nobody getting a delivery. (Though you could argue it involves a package.)   UPS = Underwear Panic Syndrome.   It’s real.   Underwear Panic Syndrome is that sinking feeling an older guy gets when the cute, young nurse is going to see his underwear, and he has no idea which pair he has on.   Let’s face it, y’all, we all have underwear that should have found the trash can a long time back. It’s got holes, it’s got a shot elastic band, it’s got (whispering…) stains! You know what I’m talking about here.   To further expound on UPS, here’s some info you didn’t ask for, but I’m a briefs guy. Always have been.   I get that briefs are not particularly cool, but neither am I. With briefs, I get the one thing I demand from my underwear: support for the troops.   Let’s keep everybody together. Nobody needs to be wandering off.   (For the record, briefs used to be cool. Google images of ‘Jim Palmer underwear.’)   In college, I experimented with a few things. One of those was boxers, because a lot of my friends wore boxers. I spent those few days doing a whole lot of… um, adjusting.   As I have lived my life and observed a few things, I’ve never regretted staying with briefs. I’ve said it before, I’ll say it again. Women aren’t the only ones affected by gravity.   At one point in my morning radio show career, I had a mid-20s, male co-host who wore boxers. Because we’re boys, I suppose, underwear was a frequent topic of discussion. Our female partner was proud to proclaim her preference for going commando, so she mostly just refereed our briefs vs boxers arguments.   “You’ll regret boxers,” I would warn him. “Your knees will have playmates when you’re older.”   One day, he texted me from the local YMCA. He had just finished a workout and while in the locker room had encountered a much older man, shaving in front of the lavatory mirror. Nude.   My cohort had just seen his future. And I have never received a text containing so many exclamation points.   He now wears boxer briefs.   And maybe that should be my direction. Boxer briefs tend to keep all the eggs in the basket, as some of us prefer, and are probably considered cooler than briefs. Again though, I’ve experimented and still prefer briefs.   The UPS I suffered the day before Thanksgiving wasn’t as much about just wearing briefs as it was about the color of briefs I might have on.   Underwear multi-packs usually contain various colors: black, gray, blue, red, even white can be included. (Never brown, though. Wonder why? Especially for men of a certain age.)   I rarely wear the white ones, usually opting for another color. But what if I was wearing the blue ones? They’re not a manly dark blue. They’re a baby blue. Carolina blue. Might as well be tighty-whities, really.   As I unbuckled my belt to drop my drawers, I secretly prayed: please no blue, please no blue.   Ta da! Black! Yes!   But they were still briefs, and I still felt some pangs of shame.   To wrap up the hospital story, my blood pressure had gotten whacked out (I had wa-a-a-y overdone salty foods the day before), and I was released 24 hours later after extensive testing determined my heart is actually in excellent condition.   But comfortably back home, I’m thinking I need an undies upgrade. Maybe buy some boxer briefs to keep in the truck. Next time I take myself to the hospital, I can do a quick-change before walking into the emergency room to announce that I may be having a heart attack.   When the cute nurse tells me to undress, she will still see an older man with a ponchy belly, large love handles, a developing turkey neck and gray, thinning hair, but she’ll see I still got style.   She won’t say it out loud, but she’ll be thinking, “Hey, cool undies.”   Winner, winner, chicken dinner, old man!   You take your little victories whenever they come.
  • This is not a story about traveling to Italy. It mentions Italy because that’s where I finally found clarity for my life.   Since clarity is a rarity, it is charity for me to share for thee.    I’m not gonna lie. Since retiring, I’ve struggled.    While comfortably tucked into my career as a morning radio show announcer, I knew how my day would go. I’d finish up work around 10 or 11 am every morning, then go join the old fart golf group that teed off every day around lunchtime. Many years, I would play 150 days or more.    The point is, I knew what I was doing with my days. In retirement, I’m playing maybe 50 rounds a year. That leaves a lot of days in limbo.    To some extent, golf has been replaced by travel. Oh, it’s not all exotic. For example, we’re taking in more live concerts now, so sometimes our trips are just a quick overnighter to hear an artist we enjoy.    We’ve fallen in love with Nashville, Tennessee’s music scene, so we wind up in Music City way more than I would have ever imagined.    Still, we are trying to see some other parts of the world and recently returned to Italy for the second time in two years. And for a second time, we hooked up with a travel guide named Max.    On our first tour of Old Italia, it took Max about one day to figure out what we liked: wine. With lunch.    On our just-completed trip, he didn’t even ask what we wanted to see. Every day, he had arranged a wine tasting at a nice winery, usually with lunch thrown in.    Lunch often lasted for a couple of hours. Afterwards, Max would just drive us around until we fell asleep. When we woke up, he’d tell us of the nice places he had taken us and say something like, “too bad you slept through it.”    In the Tuscany region, we hit a couple of places that are actually referred to as wine castles. Translated to English, that’s a castle with wine.    A castle, y’all. With wine. Take a moment, if you need to.    Besides wine, another thing to love about Italy is gelato. Gelato is actually Italiano for ice cream, but gelato is better. It uses more milk…. something, something, something… so it’s not just like American ice cream.    Gelato is sold in a gelateria. If you think about it, that makes sense. Pizza is sold in a pizzeria; gelato, in a gelateria.    I’m a big fan of gelato. Specifically, coconut, though I’m multi-gelatinous and can swing many directions.    So, the epiphany: I want to open a gelateria in a wine castle.    When I told my wife, she suggested I build the castle from the corks we have in the basement. It was meant as a snide remark, a dig at me for saving corks, even though I have no plan to do anything with them.    But her idea is brilliant. A cork castle!    Enemy bullets would bounce right off the cork walls. And if someone bombed my castle, what’s the damage? Broken cork? No problem.    “Hey, we need more cork!” And out comes a corkscrew.    My cork castle would also be flood-proof. The same rains that floated Noah’s arc would float my castle. When the rain subsided, who knows what country my castle would have landed in? But it wouldn’t matter. The local chamber of commerce would welcome me. Because I’ve got a castle full of wine.    And gelato.    Who wouldn’t want to be my friend?    Beautiful minds like mine – and Steve Jobs – don’t come along that often. I can only imagine that you’re thinking, ‘Dang, I wish I had thought of that first!’    But you didn’t.    Bring money. I will be charging admission.   
  • Maybe you’ve seen the post – or email – making the rounds about how ‘old’ people should present themselves? It defines old as 60 or over. So much for 60 being the new 40, eh? If you haven’t seen it, here’s a sample of some pairings it suggests you avoid: A nose ring and bifocals  Miniskirts and support hose Unbuttoned disco shirts and a heart monitor Bikinis and liver spots Thongs and Depends. Cute. But on a more serious note, I’m here today to address the first item, the nose ring.  *GRUMPY OLD MAN ALERT* I’m not good with some current trends. If I’ve not mentioned it before, I hate tattoos. I hate them more on women than men. To me, they look trashy.  I’m trying to adapt. Mainly, because everybody but me seems to have one. Also, I know some really quality, non-trashy ladies with tattoos. By ‘quality’ I mean I’ve Googled them and can’t find any pictures of them without clothes.  I’ve never liked belly button jewelry. (Unless you’re a belly dancer. In that case, you might as well put something shiny in that cavern.) Nose and lip studs? Nope. But I’m trying really hard to be a better person and stop judging the book by its cover. That’s probably my biggest flaw, honestly. But the one decoration I do not get is the nose ring. First thought: are you a dang cow?? If we go out on a date, can I hitch up a rope to that thing and lead you into the theater? I don’t care how otherwise beautiful you are, inside or out, something hanging out your nose does not look good. And there’s nothing – NOTHING – you can do to change that. Make it silver, gold, bejeweled, bigger, petite, or blessed by the Pope, it’s still something coming out of your nose and needs wiping. I know, shut up ol’ man!
  • Just returned from a trip that included a few days in New York City. It wasn’t my first time. We were there just two years ago, so I knew I was getting in to. I love/hate that place.    The over-the-top weirdness of Time Square. Visiting the M&M store and paying $14 a pound for peanut M’s that would cost about $3 at my local grocery store. A truly unintelligible subway system. The fabulous – use your ‘jazz hands…’ fab-u-louus - Broadway shows.    It’s like no other place. It’s also like no other place should aspire to be, really. Especially the subway trains. The subway system there was designed by chimpanzees who then hired kindergarteners to draw the maps and legends explaining it.    Locals eventually figure it out by osmosis; visitors have no chance.    The way we handle the trains is to wander around in the subway station looking lost until someone takes pity on us and helps.    Mostly, we just walk. We certainly don’t attempt to drive in that carnival.    If you do drive in NYC, you need to be fluent in ‘horn.’ It’s the official language of drivers there.    But here’s what I’ve figured out: Honkers are almost always several cars back in the pack.    The first car in line has stopped because it’s illegal to run over pedestrians. The second car can see what’s going on so sits quietly. Get back to about the fourth or fifth car and all they know is that the light is green and they ain’t moving.    *beeeeeep*    Honking changes nothing, but I reckon it gives the drivers a way to vent their frustration of being in a city where a billion people live and having to deal with another billion visitors who know it’s illegal for you to run over them with your car and will therefore cross the street whenever they dang well want, traffic lights be damned.    The other language of New York City is every other language in the world. Except English.    Look, I’m a bumkin in The City, but I’m telling you, it was rare to hear English conversationally spoken. On the streets, in the subways, in the bars (so I’m told), on the elevators, the conversations were almost always in a foreign language.    That’s more observation than complaint.    To start with, we all know that as a country we’ve become heavily reliant on immigrants for service work. The servers, dishwashers, attendants, hotel staff… the list is endless of jobs immigrants are willing to do for the opportunity to live in the States.    Now, couple that with all the foreign visitors who are simply making NYC one of their must-do destinations, and there’s a whole lot of no speak-y English going on.    What if, I thought… what if we passed a law that required everyone in an American city to speak only English. That would probably cut down on the crowds since so many people would have to learn the language instead of relying on a single interpreter to be the English voice for their entire bus.    Then there’s a possible downside. What if that law not only required English, but required the proper use of the language?    That would shut most Americans out of places like New York City.    So, let me just say this, y’all. I ain’t never gonna go back to that place. Not never, not no how. I don’t know what them farners are sayin’, an’ until them people done learned how to tawk like me, I’d just a-soon stay home.    Somebody fetch me a beer.

Local News

  • An Athens-based manufacturing firm will open a facility in Banks County, creating about 30 jobs: RAI will build in the Martin Bridge area off I-85 in Banks County.    “Georgia’s manufacturing industry has seen many wins in recent years, and we are proud that RAI is expanding their already successful operation into Martin Bridge,” says Governor Brian Kemp. “As the Top State for Business, our skilled workforce has received national recognition, and I am confident that it will meet the company’s needs as they create exciting, new opportunities for hardworking Georgians in Banks County.” RAI says it will be hiring welders, fabricators, machine operators, detailers, material handlers, project managers, coating specialists, and quality controllers at the new facility at the Martin Bridge exit, the only undeveloped exit on I-85.
  • Lumpkin County state Senator Steve Gooch will be among those taking part in the next Rural Prosperity Summit hosted by the Georgia Chamber of Commerce. It will take place next month at the UGA campus in Tifton.    From the Ga Chamber of Commerce…   The Georgia Chamber will be hosting its third annual Rural Prosperity Summit on October 1-2, 2019 at the UGA Tifton Campus Conference Center in Tifton.    About 450 attendees are anticipated to join for the two-day Summit which features expert speakers, elected officials, practitioner panels and small group conversations that will share meaningful solutions to challenges facing rural communities.    Notable speakers include: S. Congressman Buddy Carter S. Congressman Austin Scott Former U.S. Congressman Lindsay Thomas Attorney General Chris Carr President and CEO of the Woodruff Arts Center, Doug Shipman CEO of Goodwill North Georgia, Keith Parker S. Census Bureau Partnership Specialist, Thurmond N. Tillman Economic Innovation Group’s Director for Research and Policy Development, Kenan Fikri Atlanta-based rural community writer and advocate, Alan Richard   Elected officials planning to attend include:  Senator Ellis Black Senator Steve Gooch Senator Tyler Harper Senator Freddie Powell Sims Representative Debbie G. Buckner Representative Matthew Gambill Representative Dominic LaRiccia Representative Clay Pirkle Representative Ken Pullin Regional Representative from Congressman Austin Scott’s Office Regional Representatives from U.S. Senator David Perdue’s Office
  •  The University of Georgia, just in time for Notre Dame weekend, is hosting an art exhibit, featuring George Cooke’s Interior of St Peter’s Rome. From Larry Dendy... Enjoy a rare opportunity to view at close range an acknowledged 19th century art masterpiece by American artist George Cooke from 3 to 6 pm Friday, September 20, on the University of Georgia campus. Interior of St. Peter’s Rome, which is 17 feet high, 23 feet long, and weighs more than a ton,   was described as the largest framed oil painting in the United States when it was exhibited in the 1840s. George Cooke (1793-1849), an itinerant artist whose paintings have been found in private collections in a dozen states spent much time in Athens. His 1845 painting titled View of Athens from Carr’s Hill, is housed in the Rare Books section of the University of Georgia Libraries. Another of his works Tallulah Falls  1841, is part of the permanent collection at UGA’s Georgia Museum of Art. Art patron Daniel Pratt commissioned and owned Interior of St. Peter’s Rome. After Cooke’s sudden death from illness in New Orleans in 1849, Pratt became executor of the artist’s estate. Seeking an appropriate venue to exhibit this large work, and with the support of Cooke’s widow, who married an Athenian, Pratt donated the painting to the University of Georgia in 1867 and shipped the painting to Athens. University officials decided to mount the painting on the interior back wall of the 1832 Greek Revival-style University Chapel, and the installation was completed in 1868 and opened for public view. The painting has been restored twice, in 1936 and 1955, to recover from age and fire damage. Visitors on Friday, September 20, will be able to walk close to the painting and make photographs. The closest approach will be to enter the University of Georgia through its historic Arch on Broad Street, at the foot of College Avenue. SilverDawg volunteers will greet visitors and direct them along the walkway to the University Chapel.
  • The director of the Athens-Clarke County Animal Shelter is out of work: County Manager Blaine Williams says he has asked for and received the resignation of David Fluck, who has held the job for the past 12 years. The Shelter has been the focus of much community criticism over the past several months.  From the Athens-Clarke Co government website… Athens-Clarke County Unified Government Manager Blaine Williams announces the resignation of Central Services Department Director David Fluck. The resignation was effective September 16, 2019. Williams requested Fluck’s resignation.  'After careful consideration, I decided that it would be best for the community and the department for a change in leadership moving forward. I want to thank David for his work for the Athens community and the Unified Government,” said Williams. “Not only did he serve as the Central Services Director for over a dozen years, but he also served in an additional role as Interim Airport Director for a number of months while we conducted a search for a new director.”  Williams has appointed Sustainability Officer Andrew Saunders to serve as Interim Director until a permanent replacement is named after a national search. Saunders has worked with the Athens-Clarke County Unified Government since 2007 in various roles, including as the Community Forestry Coordinator, Environmental Coordinator, and Sustainability Officer.  The Athens-Clarke County Central Services Department consists of the Animal Control Division, which operates the Animal Shelter and Animal Control services; the Facilities Management Division, which maintains ACCGov-owned property; the Fleet Management Division, which manages most Unified Government vehicles; the Landscape Management Division, which maintains grounds and landscapes at ACCGov facilities and roadways; and Internal Support, which provides services for ACCGov departments such as mailing services, printing services, copy services, parking, and telephone services. The department also handles special event permitting, publication rack permitting, and downtown vending permits. 
  • Northeast Georgia Health System has reached an agreement to acquire Habersham Medical Center in Demorest. “Many people in Habersham County have asked for a deal like this for years, and many before us have tried to make it happen,” says Lynn Boggs, HMC’s chief executive officer. “We’re thrilled to deliver this agreement, which can lead to security and stability for this community’s local hospital. We are truly working together for healthier tomorrows.” “This is a win-win for the future of our community, and it has taken creative thinking and innovative solutions by all parties involved to create this positive path forward,” says Stacy Hall, chairman of the Habersham County Commission. “This puts power back in the hands of the people of Habersham County. By utilizing HMC’s services, they will make both the hospital and county financially stronger.” The five-year plan calls for Northeast Georgia Healty System to invest $3 million annually to help Habersham Medical Center fund capital projects to enhance and expand services for the hospital in Demorest.

Bulldog News

  • ATHENS Notre Dame coach Brian Kelly believes his quarterback will be at his best Saturday night against a talented, but 'not very complicated' Georgia defense. '(Ian Book) had a great week of practice, he's going to play really well against Georgia,' Kelly said on his radio show on Thursday night. 'You're going to see the best of Ian Book in Athens.' The No. 3-ranked Bulldogs (3-0) are a two-touchdown favorite over the No. 7 Irish, but you'd never know it listening to the confident Kelly. we play a lot of bigs games..our guys are used to playing a lot of bg gaems Georgia's massive offensive line, averaging 6-foot-5 and 329 pounds per man, is thought by many to rank among the best in college football Kelly has indicated throughout the week he's not overly concerned about how his defensive line matches up. 'It's an advantage for us,' Kelly said. 'We play these teams that slant and angle, and we haven't been very good with slant and angle teams, so we'll know where they are, and that's a good thing' Kelly has been complimentary of Georgia QB Jake Fromm throughout the week, but he's confident in Notre Dame's pass rush and pass defense. 'We're a top-down defense, certainly, but what we're better at this year is we're pressing on the outside, and the pass rush forces the ball out of your hands so quickly that the routes don't develop to the top end,' said Kelly, whose Irish rank third in the nation in pass efficiency defense. 'A lot of the interceptions, the route has not finished, so we're getting at the ball before the route finishes. When we can do that, we can be in position to undercut routes and not cheat on things. We're getting to the quarterback before he can get through his progression.' Kelly pointed out how simple the Georgia offense is, a necessity because of young receivers still learning their assignments. 'They do keep it fairly simple offensively, they're sitting down in zones and they are taking shots because they want to get their receivers to grow,' Kelly said. 'It's a young group, extremely talented, and they are coming on, and they re gong to be very good offensively once these receivers continue to mature. 'Early on they gave them some very simplified passing concepts, they did a great job with them, and we'll have to do a great job against them.' Crowd noise figures to be a factor, so Notre Dame went inside its new football building this week and turned the noise up to 107 decibels. Kelly is confident that Book's ability to communicate and adjust to Georgia's uncomplicated defensive schemes could provide a winning edge. 'How you quiet a great crowd is you score points and get ahead,' Kelly said. But if they are into the game and it's a close game, then you have to communicate effectively. 'We can't get into our process and into our traits, which I think can trump a lot of the things Georgia can do, unless we communicate effectively.' While crowd noise seems to be Kelly's biggest concern for his offense, tocus and gap integrity are the two areas Kelly stressed on defense. 'If you're distracted for a second against Georgia, they have a guy named D'Andre Swift, and he'll run past you if you do't fit the A gap,' Kelly said. 'You have to fit every play, and every play has to be 11 players playing together.' Beyond that, it's just a matter of playing Notre Dame football, the Irish accustomed to setting stadium attendance records (this will be the 10th time) wherever they go. 'Play fast, play free, be aggressiveyou don't go down there to play conservative football,' said Kelly, 23-17 vs. Top 25 teams at Notre Dame but 0-4 against Top 5 opponents. 'There's no pressure. We play in so many (big games) . and understand when you go on the road it's one play at a time, and you have to be patient. Very rarely are these games won early, they are won late.' Notre Dame coach Brian Kelly The post Notre Dame's Brian Kelly reveals Irish advantages, starting at quarterback appeared first on DawgNation.
  • ATHENS This season's edition of Georgia football has more talent than the 2017 Bulldogs that played for the national championship, according to Bulldogs' legend David Pollack. Pollack, speaking Friday as part of ESPN's College GameDay crew, had plenty to say about the rise of Georgia football and keys to this season. RELATED: 7 UGA players to watch closely Saturday The popular ESPN show is in Athens for the first time since 2013 to preview and highlight the No. 3-Ranked Bulldogs' showdown against No. 7 Notre Dame at 8 p.m. on Saturday at Sanford Stadium. It's also the first time CBS hasn't used it's one-time night game exemption for the Alabama-LSU clash since 2010. 2017 vs. 2019 Pollack's comments on the 2019 team's talents pack a punch when one considers the 2017 Bulldogs played in the CFP Championship Game. 'The 2019 team is more talented team than the 2017 team, that's fact, that's not even debatable,' Pollack said 'In 2017, Kirby was playing players that were really smart, that were in the right position, that weren't necessarily athletic freaks. Now it's fun to have both, he's got a combination of athleticism across the board, they're deep in every single spot. 'What does that mean? There's competition in every spot, that's the biggest thing, guys,' Pollack said. 'When you've got somebody breathing down your neck, to take your job, and take your spot, it makes you work harder, and Georgia has got that at every position across the board.' These are the good old days for Georgia football, Pollack said. Best ever? The Bulldogs haven't won a national championship since 1980, former UGA coach and athletic director Vince Dooley recently honored with the Sanford Stadium field being named in his honor. But Pollack believes times are good at Georgia and will get even better. 'You're living in the days where it's going to be the best in Georgia history,' Pollack said. 'If you need a team out there, Georgia is a good one to pick. If you're going to buy stock, they're stocked across the board. 'You look at all the 5-star guys and all the recruits, the discipline they play with now, and the toughness they play with, they're not going anywhere.' Pollack said there's only one Georgia position group that still concerns him, and he's looking to see who steps up against the Irish on Saturday night. Catching on 'Somebody has to step up at wide receiver for Georgia and be the guy, and I'm interested to see if it's (George) Pickens, if it's (Dominick) Blaylock Demetris Robertson is a little banged up, Kearis (Jackson) got banged up earlier in the year,' Pollack said. 'Somebody needs to get on the page with Jake Fromm that we saw years ago, with back shoulder fades, and a guy that he can trust,' Pollack said. 'Because if you're going to point to a weakness for this team, or a question mark for Georgia, it's the receivers. There is no other question mark on this team, everywhere else is pretty solid.' Pickens and Blaylock rank No. 1 and No. 2 in catches for Georgia to this point of the season, with grad transfers Eli Wolf (tight end) and Lawrence Cager rounding out the top four. Notre Dame's hope As for Notre Dame's chances against the Bulldogs, Pollack said it all comes down to Ian Book. 'I don't think there's any player in the country that has to be more productive for their team to win this week than Ian Book,' Pollack said. 'Ian Book has to be great, and it's got to be with his legs, he's got to run the ball effectively, he's got to scramble and throw the football effectively 'He's a really a talented kid, and if Notre Dame is going to come down here and pull off an upset against a Georgia team that's more talented them them, it's going to have to be Ian Book playing not (just) good, but really good, beyond good levels, to great levels.' Georgia legend David Pollack DawgNation Georgia-Notre Dame Georgia football injury report for Notre Dame game Irish QB Ian Book keeping his cool entering matchup David Pollack says Nolan Smith rising star Georgia zeroed in on Notre Dame quarterback World of difference in Jake Fromm now from 2017 Georgia newcomers proving pivotal to season success Jake Fromm, Crush it and flush it,' on to Notre Dame Brian Kelly says Irish found themselves' in 66-14 win Notre Dame coach says team in position to win national title 3 things Georgia must avoid against Notre Dame The post David Pollack: 2019 Georgia football more talented than 2017 version, that's fact' appeared first on DawgNation.
  • ATHENS Georgia takes center stage in college football on Saturday in a game with No. 7-ranked Notre Dame that will set the 2019 narrative for the Bulldogs. Much has already been learned about this season's team, Georgia holding its No. 3 ranking with a 3-0 start that has featured impressive wins. WATCH: Georgia's exciting It Takes What It Takes' pregame video The Bulldogs have, in fact, been so overwhelming that top players haven't seen a great deal of action in the past two outings. Georgia legend Herschel Walker took note on Thursday, saying it's time for Georgia to show why it's Running Back U. 'You talk about Swift, people don't know how good that kid is,' Walker said. 'He's only running the ball 11 times (per game), but he's averaging 9 yards a carry.' Let's talk more about Swift leading the '7 players to watch' against Notre Dame. D'Andre Swift This game has been a long time coming for Swift. Swift is coming off his first healthy collegiate offseason. The results are obvious, with Swift adding power and authority to his sharp-cutting arsenal since his big-stage debacle in the Sugar Bowl. Swift's 16-carry effort in the season-opener against Vanderbilt fell one short of his carer-high, but there's a chance he could surpass that against Notre Dame. RELATED: Why Georgia could run over Notre Dame The Irish will be loaded up to stop the run, but Swift's ability to find seams, bounce runs and catch the ball makes him a sure-thing for a high volume of touches and more than 100 yards from scrimmage and at least one touchdown. The 'Great Wall' The Georgia offensive line has received more fanfare and celebrity than any college line in recent memory, and this is the game for it to truly make its mark. Andrew Thomas, Solomon Kindley, Trey Hill, Ben Cleveland and Cade Mays are on task, with Isaiah Wilson possibly coming back from his ankle injury. Notre Dame coach Brian Kelly said his defensive line hasn't gotten knocked off the ball this season, indicating the Irish's porous run defense (120th in the nation) has more to do with fits and run support. The lights will be shining on the Bulldogs' trench giants. Charlie Woerner Why do I get a sneaky feeling the senior tight end might be in for a big night? Is it because his uncle, Scott, was an All-American who starred for Georgia and was part of the 1980 national championship team that beat Notre Dame? RELATED: An inside story on Charlie Woerner and his recruitment Let's face it, America loves a good storyline, and seeing Charlie Woerner have a big game against the Irish is what most every Bulldogs' fan is looking for. As for fast-rising tight end Eli Wolf, Tennessee is up next on the schedule, and the former Vols' captain can get a carry into the Neyland Stadium end zone from the fullback position to make headlines that game week. Monty Rice It's time for Monty Rice to come out of relative anonymity on the national stage and show his value for Georgia. The Bulldogs have been playing a lot of defenders at linebacker, building depth. But Rice is the front-line backer and the heart of the defense. His sideline-to-sideline play and hard-hitting should be evident against the Irish. Rice has 15 tackles this season, but he could end up with 10 or more against Notre Dame. James Cook Cook is a weapon who should touch the ball at least 10 times every game, whether that's on handoffs, passes or in the return game. Cook averages 12.9 yards per carry and 9.5 per catch and 20.5 on kick return. Explosive, dynamic and fast, there don't seem to be enough adjectives to describe just how exciting of a player Cook is in the open field. Every time Cook touches the ball, there's an electricity in the air that he could score. SportsCenter Highlight in 3-2-1 . George Pickens Pickens is on the DawgNation 'Watch' List every week, and every week, the player wearing the No. 1 on offense shows why. Smart said Pickens still has work to do, but the quarterback and offensive coordinator keep showing confidence in the work that he does with the football thrown in his direction. Kudos to Smart and his staff recognizing that taking advantage of Pickens' great talents. Even while he's ironing out other wrinkles, having Pickens in the game plan gives Georgia its best chance to win. Nolan Smith Speaking of tremendous potential coming to fruition, outside linebacker Nolan Smith has a raptor-like burst that all-time UGA defensive great David Pollack described as 'freaky.' Smith saw limited snaps last Saturday, and one can't help but wonder if Smart wanted to do his best to keep this elite pass-rushing talent under wraps for one more week. Nolan Smith will be a household name in the SEC soon enough. DawgNation Georgia-Notre Dame Georgia football injury report for Notre Dame game Irish QB Ian Book keeping his cool entering matchup David Pollack says Nolan Smith rising star Georgia zeroed in on Notre Dame quarterback World of difference in Jake Fromm now from 2017 Georgia newcomers proving pivotal to season success Jake Fromm, Crush it and flush it,' on to Notre Dame Brian Kelly says Irish found themselves' in 66-14 win Notre Dame coach says team in position to win national title 3 things Georgia must avoid against Notre Dame The post 7 Georgia football players to watch closely against Notre Dame appeared first on DawgNation.
  • DawgNation has four staffers who cover Georgia football from every angle: Beat, live streams, photos, podcasts, recruiting, etc. The 'Cover 4' concept is: 1) Present a topic; 2) Offer a reasoned response; 3) Share a brisk statement to support the informed opinion. 4) Pepper the page with photos for the big picture. For this edition, we discuss the most improved Bulldogs on the team since last season. DawgNation continues with the 'Cover 4' concept. It was a regular in our story rotation in 2018. We have four staffers who cover UGA athletics on a full-time basis. It means the focus shifts to a timely 'Cover 4' look with each of our guys manning the secondary here. The quick in-and-out game remains. These takes are designed to come out quicker than former Bulldog Mecole Hardman Jr. ran the 40 at the NFL combine. We're trying a DawgNation.com first today in advance of the Notre Dame game: Join us in the DawgNation forum for a live chat at 3 p.m. today WHAT: A DawgNation first. The Cover 4 crew (BA, Connor, Griff and some lowly intern type) will be in this forum thread from 3-4 PM talking and answering anything you good people have for the Georgia-Notre Dame game. WHEN: Today. 3-4 PM HOW DO I GET THERE: Click this link. New forum members will have to go through a brief and free sign-up for our DawgNation forums. WHY: We figured you needed to wrap up your workweek a little early given the big game on Saturday HAVE A QUESTION?: Go ahead and drop it in that forum thread now. We'll be sure to answer the first ones we see once that 3 p.m. start time hits. FOR REAL?: Yes, that's just a way to thank each and everyone one of you for helping make this forum what it is today. We want to continue to build this to be a place where you can get in touch with us, interact and get your UGA questions acknowledged right from our guys. Be there. Get ready for The The 2019 season 'Cover 4' topics so far: Georgia's biggest edge on Notre Dame will be . The most improved Bulldog since last season is . A few big non-score predictions for Georgia-Vanderbilt Which returning Bulldogs impressed the most in fall camp? The players set to become the new fan favorites for 2019 are . What will convince you the Bulldogs are throwing the ball more this fall? What kind of numbers will D'Andre Swift put up in 2019? Jake Fromm's best quality? The Cover 4 crew chops that one up DawgNation Nickel: What was the alarming trend coming out of spring ball in Athens? The post Cover 4: Join us in the DawgNation forum at 3 PM for a live chat appeared first on DawgNation.
  • ATHENS Georgia football coach Kirby Smart appears on the verge of letting the so-called lion out of the cage after a week of keeping his team emotionally balanced and focused on the task at hand. 'It takes what it takes,' has been one of the Bulldogs' team slogans throughout the offseason, and now it's featured in another classic UGA football video. The No. 3-ranked Bulldogs (3-0) play host to No. 7 Notre Dame (2-0) in the first non-conference game featuring two Top 10 teams at Sanford Stadium since 1966. RELATED: Herschel Walker says it's time for Georgia to display RBU 'Our guys are excited to get to play on a national stage in a home game atmosphere that will probably be unrivaled in Georgia history from a non-conference standpoint,' Smart said on the SEC teleconference on Wednesday. 'I know they are excited with a team like Notre Dame coming to town, it is really a special event.' The UGA football film crew captured the build-up in the national media along with sharing behind-the-scenes footage of Georgia's preparation. The Bulldogs' early season schedule at Vanderbilt, home against Murray State and Arkansas State hasn't provided much of a challenge. 'We're not really sure what to make of Georgia,' former Alabama national championship quarterback Greg McElroy says in the UGA hype video. 'This is going to be a different experience than anything else than they've ever had in the regular season,' said SEC Network analyst Marcus Spears. Joey Galloway, a former Ohio State star receiver now ESPN analyst, is spliced into the Georgia video saying what most in the Georgia fan base is thinking. 'Yeah, this Georgia Bulldogs team we've seen the past few years,' Galloway said. 'They've been there, they've done it, now they've got to find a way to get over the top.' Smart, shown talking to his team, summed it up. 'It's about showing the country we're one of the best teams,' Smart said, 'and you do that by how you play on the field.' It takes what it takes Week 4 Trailer | It Takes What It Takes #ATD #GoDawgs pic.twitter.com/hA1poL1LLe Georgia Football (@GeorgiaFootball) September 20, 2019 DawgNation Georgia-Notre Dame Georgia football injury report for Notre Dame game Irish QB Ian Book keeping his cool entering matchup David Pollack says Nolan Smith rising star Georgia zeroed in on Notre Dame quarterback World of difference in Jake Fromm now from 2017 Georgia newcomers proving pivotal to season success Jake Fromm, Crush it and flush it,' on to Notre Dame Brian Kelly says Irish found themselves' in 66-14 win Notre Dame coach says team in position to win national title 3 things Georgia must avoid against Notre Dame The post WATCH: Georgia football It Takes What It Takes' video captures pre-game excitement appeared first on DawgNation.