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UGA Softball alters schedule for 15th annual Georgia Classic

UGA Softball alters schedule for 15th annual Georgia Classic

UGA Softball alters schedule for 15th annual Georgia Classic
Photo Credit: Steffenie Burns
Georgia utility Kaylie Harding (7) during the Bulldogs' game against Evansville at Jack Turner Softball Stadium in Athens, Ga. on Saturday, Feb. 17, 2018. (Photo by Steffenie Burns)

UGA Softball alters schedule for 15th annual Georgia Classic

ATHENS, Ga. – Due to the threat of inclement weather on Sunday in Athens, #14 Georgia softball has changed the schedule for this weekend’s 15th Annual Georgia Classic.


Georgia will host College of Charleston, ETSU, and Gardner-Webb at Jack Turner Stadium. The eight-game tournament will be played Friday and Saturday.


Friday’s slate will begin with Gardner-Webb vs. ETSU at 10:30 a.m. followed by Charleston vs. ETSU at 1. Georgia will begin tournament play at 3:30 against Charleston followed by a matchup with Gardner-Webb in the nightcap at 6.


Saturday’s schedule will also be changed. A rematch between ETSU and Gardner-Webb will begin the day followed by Gardner-Webb taking on Charleston at 1. Georgia takes on Charleston at 3:30 followed by ETSU to round out the tournament.


Admission to all Georgia softball games is free for all fans.


Live stats will be available all weekend long at GeorgiaDogs.com as well as live Twitter updates on the official Twitter page of the Bulldogs, @UGAsoftball.


15th Annual Georgia Classic Schedule


10:30 a.m. – Gardner-Webb vs. ETSU

1 p.m. – College of Charleston vs. ETSU

3:30 p.m. – College of Charleston vs. Georgia

6 p.m. – Gardner-Webb vs. Georgia


10:30 a.m. – ETSU vs. Gardner-Webb

1 p.m. – Gardner-Webb vs. College of Charleston*

3:30 p.m. – College of Charleston vs. Georgia

6 p.m. – ETSU vs. Georgia


Home team is listed second and will occupy the third base dugout

*College of Charleston will be the home team but will occupy the first base dugout

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Local News

  • The Georgia Bulldog football team held its second spring practice session Thursday: coach Kirby Smart and the Dogs are gearing up for the April 21 G-Day game in Sanford Stadium.    From UGA Sports Communications…   Under cloudless skies with a steady wind and temperatures hovering in the upper 50s, the Georgia football team had its second practice of the spring on Thursday afternoon.   The Bulldogs kicked off the spring on Tuesday with a two and a half hour session. On Wednesday, all 32 NFL teams sent representatives to Athens to cover the annual Pro Day where 21 former players worked out in preparation for the coming NFL Draft on April 26-28. The current Bulldogs returned to work at the Woodruff Practice Fields on Thursday with another two and a half hour practice in shorts and helmets.   This marks the second of 15 spring practices for Georgia, including the annual G-Day intrasquad scrimmage on Saturday, April 21. The Bulldogs will complete their first week of the spring with another session this Saturday afternoon.   It was announced on Thursday that ESPN will televise the G-Day game in Sanford Stadium starting at 4 p.m. The Red team will face off versus the Black team and admission is free to the annual showdown. At halftime, fans attending G-Day can expect to be introduced to UGA's incoming class of 2018 signees.    Prior to the G-Day matchup, lettermen from the program’s past will square off on the field starting at 1:15 p.m. With expected high demand and temporarily reduced seating due to the construction on the new West End Zone complex, the UGA Athletic Association will be implementing a pass system. Upon entrance, each fan will receive a commemorative pass with a seating section. The UGAAA asks that each fan sits in this section to help manage what is expected to be a near-capacity crowd.    Gates 2-9 will be open as usual. However, Gate 10 (gate under the bridge next to the Tate Center) will be closed due to construction. To help reduce congestion and further improve ingress flow, please enter on the side of the stadium where each fan’s preferred seating location would be. Additional pass/entry questions can be directed to facilitysupport@sports.uga.edu. The Bulldogs begin their 2018 campaign with a home matchup versus Austin Peay on Saturday, Sept. 1. Georgia will then travel to Columbia, S.C., to open its Southeastern Conference schedule against South Carolina on Sept. 8.
  • A public input session on plans for Dudley Park is set for Saturday: it’s organized by the Athens-Clarke County Leisure Services Department. It’s underway at 8 o’clock tomorrow morning, lasting til noon at the Athens Farmers Market in Bishop Park. Leisure Services is looking for input on proposed changes to the Dudley Park master plan.    There is an afternoon meeting of the University of Georgia’s curriculum committee, a 3:30 session at New College on Herty Drive.    The Gainesville Fire Department gets money from the poultry processing firm Cargill: Cargill is giving the Department $10,000. Gainesville Fire Chief Jerome Yarbrough says they’ll use the money to beef up the Department’s search and rescue programs.  The City Council in Lula signs off on plans to renovate the Lula Depot. Estimated construction cost: a little more than $170,000.
  • The 1 year-old Madison County boy who was shot and wounded by his 2 year-old brother in Madison County has been transferred to a hospital in Atlanta. What the Madison County Sheriff’s Office says was an accidental shooting happened earlier this week at a home in Hull. The injured boy, who was shot in the shoulder, was taken first to hospital in Athens. He was, at last report, in stable condition at Eggleston Hospital in Atlanta.  His older brother was not injured. Athens-Clarke County Police were, at last report, still searching for a robbery suspect, a man who used an axe to break into a package store on Oconee Street. Store surveillance video shows the break-in. Store operators tell police the man stole about $40 worth of wine. A 40 year-old Gainesville man is arrested on methamphetamine distribution charges: the Hall County Sheriff’s Office says Edward Barker was arrested after a traffic stop on Old Cornelia Highway. He was booked into the Hall County jail. 
  • Hall County Commissioners voted on a new version of Hall County's short term rental ordinance last night in Gainesville, striking what the Commission says is a balance between the rights of property owners who want to rent their properties on a short term basis and the concerns of their neighbors.    'I'd like to thank the citizens and groups whom we've heard from concerning changes to the short term rental ordinance,' Hall County Commission Chairman Richard Higgins (pictured) said. 'We are thankful that our county is a vacation destination for people, and we want to balance the concerns and rights of property owners desiring to rent their properties on a short term basis with the welfare of their neighboring property owners.'   The latest version of the Hall County ordinance allows for short-term rentals as a permitted use in properties zoned Vacation-Cottage. The new ordinance also opens up short-term rentals to properties zoned Residential with approval from the Hall County Planning Commission that are within 500 feet of Corps of Engineers property or are within subdivisions with 10 lots or less.
  • A package that caused a scare Thursday morning at Emory Healthcare’s Woodruff Memorial Building was found to be harmless, an official said. Emory police responded to 101 Woodruff Circle in Druid Hills after a suspicious package was discovered in the mail room. Alerts went out urging people to avoid the area. However, an all-clear was issued after officials determined the package posed no threat, Emory spokeswoman Elaine Justice told The Atlanta Journal-Constitution in an email. She did not disclose the contents of the package.

Bulldog News

  • ATHENS — The week before Jake Fromm went to visit David Morris in Mobile, Ala., Eli Manning had come in and had some sessions with the renowned quarterback coach. So Morris’ perspective on good quarterback play is pretty strong. As founder of QB Country, Morris has also worked with AJ McCarron since the eighth grade, and had various stings with Matt Barkley, Chad Kelly, Jacob Coker and some guy named Tebow, Tim I believe the first name is. Morris wasn’t name-dropping. That was just me researching — OK, Googling — his list of clientele. That list includes Fromm, Georgia’s latest quarterback sensation. I reached out to Morris after I heard about Fromm using some of his spring break beach time to work out with Morris at QB Country. I was doing a story on Fromm’s offseason preparations for this season, so Morris seemed like a good guy to talk to. Being a coach in demand like he is — Morris was traveling this week to help prepare Toledo’s Logan Woodside and Riley Ferguson of Memphis for their respective pro days — he didn’t get back to me in time to be included in that story. But Fromm and Morris go back a way, and his observations were such that I definitely wanted to share them with DawgNation readers. First, a little background. They met when Fromm was just 15 years old. “I met Jake, I think it was right after his freshman year (in high school) maybe,” Morris said. “He and his father kind of found me. They reached out and we connected. They came to Mobile and we just started working together. That’s kind of how our stuff works with most of our guys. Dads do their homework and figure out what makes sense.” With those early interactions as a backdrop, Morris said he was not surprised to see Fromm have early success at Georgia. When he started working with Fromm, the kid was considered more of a baseball prospect that a football prospect. But Fromm had caught the eye of head coach Von Lassiter and quarterbacks coach Mike Chastain at Houston County High School. They, in turn, told Fromm’s father Emerson about Morris and his reputation for developing quarterbacks. The next thing Fromm knew, he was on his way to Mobile. “Coach Chastain reached out to me and said, ‘I’ve got a good one I’m going to send down to you,’ ” Morris said. “And I could see what he was talking about early on. When they’re that young, you’re thinking about things like, ‘is he mechanically sound, is he a big kid, can he make all the throws?’ Then you start projecting them out (as a prospect). Jake started getting a lot of attention that next year, his sophomore year. I think he got some offers about then. But early on, you could tell this kid had it.” Since then, Fromm and Morris have gotten together to work as often as possible. Fromm would attend the QB Country camps whenever possible, then he would seek out individual instruction anytime his schedule would allow it. It wasn’t real often, with Fromm living in another state. But that meant the visits were spread out just enough that Morris could distinctly see the progress that Fromm was making from semester to semester. Morris gives Chastain and Lassiter most of the credit for Fromm’s development. He said he showed up at QB Country with a strong foundation of fundamentals and a surprisingly strong aptitude for offensive concepts. “His ability to think fast goes back to high school,” Morris said. “He was well-coached by Coach Chastain and Coach Lassiter. Very honestly, those guys coached him up. It’s important to give those guys credit because he was a well-trained kid when he showed up. We focused more on footwork and arm position, things like that.” Fromm’s training was on display for everyone to see as a true freshman last season. After incumbent starter Jacob Eason sustained a knee injury in Georgia’s first game, Fromm started the next 14 and helped lead the Bulldogs to an SEC championship and National Championship Game berth. The national narrative on Fromm last season became that he was a game manager whose strongest contribution was to get the Bulldogs into good plays and out of bad ones. And he certainly was proficient in that regard. But Morris believes Fromm is being sold short on his passing ability. Fromm completed 62.2 percent of his passes for 2,615 yards and 24 touchdowns last season. He threw 7 interceptions and also had 3 rushing TDs. “He’s got plenty of arm strength,” Morris said. “The thing that he has that’s rare is his anticipation and touch. He’s very confident, too. As a result, you don’t see him late on throws very often. A lot of times, coming out of the gate, guys are late on throws because they’re nervous about making the wrong read. It seemed like he was on in that regard pretty much every game.” Morris was asked if he was trying to help Fromm gain velocity on his throws. “I would say he has plenty of arm,” Morris said. “He actually has a strong arm. He doesn’t have the Josh Allen arm where he can throw it 70 yards, but you don’t need to do that. And Josh Allen struggles with accuracy. Josh would like to have the accuracy Jake’s got. Jake has anticipation, touch, arm strength and accuracy. So, yeah, I’d say he’s ahead of his time on all that stuff. But I’d say the most important thing is he’s got confidence.” Like Eason last year, Fromm is wearing the hat as incumbent starter. But he can’t rest on his laurels. Georgia signed Justin Fields — the No. 1-rated dual-threat quarterback in America — to provide much-needed depth and compete with Fromm. Morris is actually quite familiar with Fields, too. Though the Kennesaw, Ga., native and Harrison High School standout has worked with Ron Veal as his personal quarterbacks coach since the sixth grade, Fields has actually had some sessions with Morris over the years at various camps. “I worked him out at the Rivals Camp last year,” Morris said. “He and the kid from Clemson (Trevor Lawrence) were there as well as (Marietta 2020 prospect) Harrison Bailey and some other guys. (Fields is) impressive. He’s a physically gifted guy that can throw it. I don’t know much more about him other than that, that he can really throw the ball.” Morris doesn’t have an opinion on the quarterback competition at Georgia, or whether it’s real or imagined. But he did say that he knows from experience that Fromm will be very difficult to run down from behind. Morris noted that Fromm’s constant and steady improvement has been uncanny to watch. That, and his physical growth. “Obviously, they’ve got a great weight program at Georgia,” Morris said with a laugh. “Jake’s 6-[foot-]2 and he’s a strong kid. I want to say he was 222, 225 when he was here, but it’s good weight. He’s got some tree trunks for legs. He doesn’t look too big to me, but I think that’s probably where he wants to stay. The one thing I always preach to him about being strong like that is that he has to maintain flexibility. You can tell early on in a workout if a kid has been paying attention to his flexibility because a lot of guys who work out too much get too stiff. They can’t turn their elbow over and it turns into a violent throw. I thought Jake still looked fluid and flexible. We spent a lot of time making sure he was as loose as he needs to be.” Morris said he spent two full days with Fromm in Mobile. Two other days, Fromm went to the beach. “He threw great,” Morris said. “I’m always challenging him on his feet, his release speed and speed in general. Those are big things for him. As far as physical traits, though, he looks like an NFL guy right now.” The post QB ‘guru’ impressed with what he saw from Jake Fromm during spring break appeared first on DawgNation.
  • Welcome to a new feature on DawgNation, where our writers answer (or try to answer) the best questions submitted by Georgia fans. If you’d like to submit a question, please e-mail us at ugaquestionoftheday@gmail.com. Or you can tweet us at here and here. Look for the Question of the Day every Monday through Friday. Did Charley Trippi make it to the championship game? What did he think of UGA’s two bowl games this year? — Susan Davis Thank you so very, very much, Ms. Davis, for sending in this question. It reminded me that I hadn’t followed up on that storyline from last season, and it also gave me a great excuse to talk to Charley and Peggy Trippi again. The last time I spoke to them was on the Sunday after the SEC Championship Game, after Georgia had learned that it would, in fact, play in the Rose Bowl for the first time since 1943, when Trippi did as a sophomore. His reaction was priceless! As for attending the actual game, Trippi and his wife had every intention of doing so. Both UGA and the Rose Bowl invited the couple to travel with the Bulldogs to California, and they were offered free passage and lodging with the Georgia contingent, of course. When the invitation was extended, Trippi told his wife immediately, “Oh, boy, let’s pack!” Unfortunately, just a short time later, when Georgia was needing to firm up arrangements, Trippi had a change of heart. He came in from his daily routine of working in the yard and realized that such a journey would be too great. While he’s in better shape than most people his age — Trippi turned 96 on Dec. 14 — he thought better of undertaking the challenge. The Trippis also were invited to the National Championship Game against Alabama at Mercedes-Benz Stadium in Atlanta. And although that game meant a car ride instead of a cross-country airplane trip, again they turned down the invitation, mainly because of the late hour of kickoff. “We were kindly invited to both,” Peggy Trippi said Thursday. “But it just wasn’t in the bag for us.” But Charley Trippi watched every play of both games on television, according to his wife. And as one might suspect, he was particularly thrilled with the Bulldogs improving to 2-0 in the Rose Bowl. “Oh, please, that was something!” Peggy Trippi said. “We enjoyed that one.” They actually enjoyed the National Championship Game a week later, too, even though the Bulldogs lost to Alabama 26-23 in overtime. Peggy said her husband still watches games intently, but very much with a coach/athlete mentality. “He watched every play, right here in our den,” Peggy said. “You know, he’s very calm and quiet. He’s kind of like, whatever happens, happens.” Charley has a hard time hearing on the phone, as one might expect. But after Peggy relayed it to him, he was able to answer my question about the Bulldogs coming oh-so-close in the national title game. “You know, they may have lost the game, but look what they’ve done in a year and a half!” Trippi said. Added his wife, “He’s behind the team, I’ll tell you that.” Have a question for beat writers Chip Towers and Seth Emerson? E-mail us at ugaquestionoftheday@gmail.com The post Charley Trippi was with Bulldogs every step of way in College Football Playoff appeared first on DawgNation.
  • ATHENS, Ga. – Seventh-ranked Georgia softball won its midweek series with in-state foe Georgia Southern Wednesday evening, 10-3.   The Bulldogs (27-2) scored in every inning and outhit the Eagles (19-9) 13-to-6. Sophomore second baseman Justice Milz scattered three hits to lead the Georgia offense. Five other Bulldogs each had two hits in the contest while sophomore first baseman Alysen Febrey drove in three runs.   Sophomore right-handed pitcher Mary Wilson Avant pitched three scoreless innings in her second start of the season. She allowed just one hit and fanned five. Freshman right-hander Lauren Mathis pitched two innings in relief in the circle, allowing both Eagle runs. Sophomore righty Amanda Ablan (2-1) earned the win as she pitched the final two innings, allowing a run.   The Bulldogs took a 2-0 in the first inning on a double off the bat of Febrey into right center.   Sophomore center fielder Ciara Bryan led off the bottom of the second with a triple to right center. She immediately scored on a groundout by freshman catcher Jessica Morgan, adding to the lead, 3-0.   Georgia pushed three runs across in the plate in the bottom of the third inning. The stanza began with a hit-by-pitch and back-to-back base hits to load the bases. Morgan singled to center, driving in pinch runner Tyler Armistead. A wild pitch in the dirt scored senior right fielder Kendall Burton. A dropped fly ball off the bat of senior left fielder Cortni Emanuel plated Bryan, lengthening the lead to 6-0 after three.   Two runs came in to score on a base hit up the middle by Alesha Mann in the Eagles’ half of the fifth, narrowing the Bulldog lead to 7-2.   A sacrifice fly off the bat of Febrey widened the margin back to six for Georgia in the bottom of the inning, 8-2.   Georgia Southern’s Logan Harrell hit a solo home run to left in the top of the sixth, narrowing the lead to 8-3.   The Bulldogs continued their scoring streak into the sixth with two more runs. The first scored when Emanuel stole second and the throw to the bag went array, allowing Morgan to come home. The next batter, Milz, reached on a fielding error by the first baseman, extending the inning and plating Emanuel, 10-3.   Georgia takes to the road this weekend for a three-game Southeastern Conference series with #21 Mississippi State. The series begins Friday at 7 p.m., EDT.   Head Coach Lu Harris-Champer 'I think we did a good job just coming out and playing softball. Allison did great tonight and had 3 RBIs, Justice came out and batted incredibly well, and Mary Wilson started us out excellently on the mound. Going on the road this weekend won't be very different for us because we're just going to play softball. We are really looking to take the positives out of every day, these girls can be upset by the outcome but what really matters is the process.'   Sophomore 2B Justice Milz 'I just kept thinking about the weather conditions tonight and knew I just needed to keep hitting groundballs up the middle and that's what happened. The weather doesn't change our game much we just have to maintain a solid mindset through the cold and the wind. My confidence has really skyrocketed going into Mississippi State because I've gotten out of my slump and I'm really excited about it.'   Sophomore RHP Mary Wilson Avant 'I think going out there and being able to command my pitches gave me confidence for the rest of the game. Also, knowing that my defense will always have my back. I think our reps, our hitters, and our defense doing everything we need to do has really boosted our confidence going into our series against Mississippi State. We can always keep our energy high, that's really the main thing we can work on this week.
  • UGA Football conducts Pro Day for NFL scouts and coaches 
  • ATHENS — Their situations are decidedly different. Then again, they’re much the same. Both Roquan Smith and Trent Thompson are juniors, so both had a year of eligibility at Georgia remaining when they decided to turn pro in January. As we understand it now, Smith toiled terribly over the decision. Thompson, by contrast, never really had a doubt. Yet, as they sit a month away from the NFL draft, it’s only Smith who seems assured of NFL riches. Nobody seems to be sure what to make of Thompson’s fortunes. He’ll get drafted, certainly, but how long he may have to wait is a matter of much debate. The buzz at Georgia’s pro day on Wednesday was that Thompson is looking at a third- or fourth-round call at best. Smith, by contrast, has been invited to the NFL draft ceremonies in Arlington, Texas, and projects as a top-15 pick. That was pretty much the feedback Smith, the 2017 Butkus Award winner, received when he filled out his underclassman evaluation application from the NFL back in December. Yet he insists his decision wasn’t the no-brainer that many of his Georgia teammates described. “Top 15 is pretty special,” said Smith, who led the SEC in tackles and the Bulldogs in sacks and tackles for loss, as well. “I knew I’d pretty much be a first-round pick; that’s what they were telling me. But, at the end of the day, it wasn’t even about that for me. It was more about the things I enjoy [at Georgia] and what we did together. It was special, very special. It’ll definitely be something I miss, but life goes on and you have to do what’s best for you.” Lorenzo Carter, Nick Chubb, Davin Bellamy and Sony Michel all chose to return in 2017 for their senior seasons for much the same reason. However, none of them received the level of draft grade that Smith did. Their feedback was similar to what Thompson heard. But these decisions aren’t based solely on draft grades and contract potential. There also can be extenuating factors. Thompson, a 6-foot-4, 295-pound defensive tackle from Albany, has been inundated with injuries throughout his college career. He had shoulder surgery a year ago and struggled with knee injuries last season. He also had a rather high-profile medical episode in February 2017 that resulted in his hospitalization and withdrawal from school. Not only did the incident create health concerns for Thompson, it also put him in a hole academically. Whether he would have been eligible to play another season for the Bulldogs is unclear. But most believe it was time for the player affectionately known as “Big Jolly” to make the jump to the pros, anyway. “Everybody has their own things going on,” said Bellamy, who also worked out for scouts Wednesday. “We don’t know what’s going on at home for a guy that may influence their decision. For Roquan, man, it was a no-brainer. I kind of felt like with him there was nothing else to prove. But I’d say the same with Trent, really. He was a three-year starter here. He put his body on the line for his team. It gets to a point where you have to be a little selfish, thinking about yourself and your career.” Thompson certainly arrived at UGA with more fanfare. In fact, when he signed with the Bulldogs out of Albany’s Westover High, he was the No. 1 overall prospect in the country, according to the composite rankings compiled by 247Sports. Thompson lived up to that billing at times. By the end of his sophomore year, he was almost unblockable. He definitely was for the AutoZone Liberty Bowl, earning both overall and defensive MVP honors with 8 tackles and 3 sacks. He’d finish the season with 56 total stops. But between recovering from shoulder surgery and battling a knee sprain, Thompson’s snaps decreased in 2017. He ended up alternating with sophomore Tyler Clark, who emerged as a star in his own right. Thompson missed two games and finished with 38 tackles, 3.5 of those for loss. “He’s been pretty beat-up,” Bellamy said of Thompson. “But he has three years of good film in the best conference in America and he’s been dominant all three of those years. I think he’s going to do pretty good at the next level.” Most everybody agrees about that. In all these cases, Georgia players who are considering making the jump early consult Kirby Smart as well as their position coaches. But they also look to sources outside the football program. The key is arriving at an informed objective opinion. “I tell them whatever that ask,” Smart said. “We’re advocates for our players and we want to do a great job for them. Trenton’s certainly done tremendous job for us since being here. He’s pushed through a lot of injuries and he’s a great kid. We wish him nothing but the best.” Smart was asked whether he thought Thompson would benefit from another year in college. “That’s not my decision,” he said. “Our job as coaches is to get them information. That’s what I always try to do. Whether they decide to go or decide to stay, it’s the same thing. You arm them with ammunition. I’ve got to give them all the information. Information is power. And then they do with the information what they want. That’s the best thing we can do as coaches.” Thompson seemed to struggle through some of his drills Wednesday. He appeared to be favoring his right leg whenever was asked to do timed runs and dummy step-overs, as well. Smith had a nearly flawless workout, even though his status indicated he need not even bother with participating. He didn’t do any of the physical testing but went through position drills with Patriots coach Bill Belichick and Lions coach Matt Patricia presiding. For as much fuss that is being made about him now, it’s hard to believe Smith ever considered coming back to Georgia one more year. “He was real close,” Smart said. “He had several moments where he was leaning toward coming back, several moments he was leaving. Again, that’s not my decision. All we do is give them the information we get and try to educate them with that information. He did a great job of handling it.” The post Same decision, different draft scenarios for Georgia juniors Roquan Smith, Trent Thompson appeared first on DawgNation.