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    ATLANTA Georgia football got the AllState Sugar Bowl invitation everyone expected and will face Baylor at 8:45 p.m. on Jan. 1 in New Orleans. The No. 5-ranked Bulldogs (11-2) are making a repeat trip to Mercedes-Benz Superdome, where last year they came off an SEC Championship Game loss and were defeated by Texas, 28-21. Big 12 runner-up Baylor (11-2) is coming off a 30-23 overtime loss to College Football Playoff semifinalist Oklahoma on Saturday. This marks the fifth time the Bulldogs and the Bears have met, UGA holding a 4-0 series lead with all four prior meetings taking place in Athens. This marks Georgia's 10th Sugar Bowl appearance and fourth in the past 18 years. The Bulldogs have played in the Sugar Bowl more than any other postseason game. It's a rich history that includes the program's most recent national championship, a 17-10 win over Notre Dame on Jan. 1, 1981. Kirby Smart's current Bulldogs entered this season with national championship aspirations, but injuries took a toll, particularly in the receiver ranks where there was already heavy attrition. Georgia lost its top five pass catchers from the 2018 season, and the passing game took a major hit when go-to target Lawrence Cager suffered shoulder, rib and ankle injuries the second half of the season. Freshman Dominick Blaylock, another of the Bulldogs top targets, suffered a season-ending knee injury in the 37-20 SEC Championship Game loss o LSU on Saturday. Blaylock has a torn ACL. Georgia also figures to be without junior tailback D'Andre Swift, who was limited to five touches in the SEC title game on account of a shoulder injury. Swift is expected to declare himself eligible for the NFL Draft and not play in the bowl game. Bulldogs' junior All-American left tackle Andrew Thomas is also headed tor the NFL Draft, but Thomas might still decide to play in the Sugar Bowl as he has maintained his health throughout the season. DawgNation Georgia football D'Andre Swift discusses limits and pain in SEC Championship Jake Fromm makes no excuses after defeat in SEC Championship Game What's next for Georgia football: Bowl bid, players leaving, staff changes WATCH: Kirby Smart sheds light on LSU, Jake Fromm passing issues Bulldogs stock report, LSU crashes Mercedes-Benz Stadium How LSU beat Georgia in SEC title game, scoring, injuries The post Georgia football lands Sugar Bowl bid, aims for sweet ending against Baylor appeared first on DawgNation.
  • Joe Burrow collected a shiny award as the game's MVP. LSU's fans had another trophy on their minds. 'Heisman! Heisman! Heisman!' they chanted. The coronation is likely complete. Burrow turned in another dazzling performance on the big stage, leading No. 1 LSU to a spot in the College Football Playoff with a 37-10 rout of No. 4 Georgia in the Southeastern Conference championship game Saturday. “Joe is the heartbeat of this team,” running back Clyde Edwards-Helaire said. The Tigers, going for their first national title since 2007 season, will either return to Atlanta or head west to suburban Phoenix for a semifinal game on Dec. 28. They surely made a persuasive case to be the top overall seed when the four-team field. and pairings are announced Sunday. Burrow was all over the stat sheet for LSU (13-0, No. 2 CFP). He threw for 349 yards and four touchdowns. He was the Tigers' second-leading rusher with 41 yards on 11 carries, often leaving the Bulldogs grasping at air as he twirled this way and that. He even caught a pass on a ball that was batted down at the line and wound up his arms, taking off for a 16-yard gain. ''He's a great athlete, man,' Georgia safety J.R. Reed said. “We had a lot of plays out there we were supposed to make, and he'd just squeeze out of it.' The Heisman-worthy moment came late in the third quarter. With Georgia (11-2, No 4 CFP) bringing the heat, Burrow spun to his left to get away from lineman Travon Walker, whirled back to his right to send Walker sprawling to the turf, then delivered a pass on the run while sprinting toward the LSU sideline with another defender in hot pursuit. Justin Jefferson hauled in the throw just beyond midfield and took off down to the Bulldogs 9 for a 71-yard play. Three plays later, Burrow delivered his third TD pass of the game, hooking up with Terrace Marshall Jr., on a 4-yard touchdown pass that essentially finished off the Bulldogs. “It was all improvised,” Burrow said. “Justin ran a 6-yard hitch route and saw me scrambling and took off deep. We got a great feel for each other. I knew exactly where he was going to be when I got out of there.” Burrow wasn't done. Derek Stingley's second pick of Jake Fromm turned the ball back over to the prolific LSU offense at the 13, and Burrow wasted no time finding Jefferson for an 8-yard TD in the waning seconds of the third quarter to send many in the predominantly Georgia crowd heading for the exits. LSU left no doubt it is the king of the mighty SEC, completing its run through a gauntlet of the league's top teams. The Tigers had already knocked off Alabama, Florida and Auburn. Now, they can add the Bulldogs to the list, ensuring the SEC will only get one team in the national playoff. LSU came into the game as the second-highest scoring team in the country behind Ohio State. They figured to have a tougher time against Georgia's stellar defense, ranked No. 2 in points allowed. but Burrow kept the Bulldogs on their heels the entire game. It was by far the most points Georgia has given up their season. Until Saturday, they held every opponent under 20 except South Carolina, which stunned the Bulldogs in double overtime nearly two months ago. There was no such drama in this one. Just total domination by the Tigers. It was a painful loss — literally — for the Bulldogs, who were making their third straight appearance in the SEC title game. Two players were carted off the field with apparently major injuries. Another player wobbled off with a concussion after being leveled on a kickoff. Fromm twisted an ankle and had to go to the medical tent to get taped up, though he missed only one play. Not that it mattered. Fromm, who guided Georgia to the cusp of the national title two years ago as a freshman, was 20 of 42 for 225 yards with those two interceptions. He didn't get much help from his teammates: Tyler Simmons dropped a deep ball on the very first possession, and Matt Landers couldn't hang on to a throw in the end zone. Georgia finally reached the end zone with just under 12 minutes remaining on Fromm's 2-yard TD pass to George Pickens. “That is a really good football team,” coach Kirby Smart said. “We were going to have to make explosive plays. We were unable to do that.” INJURY REPORT Georgia's sideline looked like a M(asterisk)A(asterisk)S(asterisk)H unit. Receiver Dominick Blaylock crumpled to the turf after going up for a catch in the first quarter. He was carted to the locker room with a left knee injury. Outside linebacker Walter Grant suffered a concussion in the third quarter from a special teams hit. LSU’s Tory Carter was ejected for targeting. Backup middle linebacker Quay Walker (right shoulder) and cornerback Tyrique Stevenson (apparent leg injury) also left the field with injuries. Star running back D'Andre Swift clearly wasn't at full strength, either, after going out of the regular-season finale against Georgia Tech with should injury. He had just two carries for 13 yards. THE TAKEAWAY LSU: The Tigers could certainly take pride in putting up 481 yards on a defense of Georgia's caliber, but the most encouraging aspect of this game was another strong performance from LSU's defense. Maligned much of the season, they followed up a 50-7 rout of Texas A&M in the regular-season finale with another championship-worthy showing against the Bulldogs, who were held to 286 yards. Georgia: Fromm came into the season projected as a high NFL draft pick who would likely go pro after his junior season. Now, it's not a reach to say he might be better off returning for his senior season to try to boost his stock. He has now failed to complete even half his passes in five straight games. UP NEXT LSU: Makes its first appearance in the College Football Playoff, which began in 2014. The Tigers last played for a national title during the 2011 season, when they won 13 straight games before a dismal 21-0 loss to Alabama in the BCS championship game. Georgia: Appears likely to make its second straight appearance in the Sugar Bowl against Baylor, loser of the Big 12 championship game. ___ More AP college football: https://apnews.com/Collegefootball and https://twitter.com/AP_Top25 ___ Follow Paul Newberry on Twitter at www.twitter.com/pnewberry1963 His work can be found at https://apnews.com
  • 21 faculty members across UGA’s schools and colleges met to discuss the development of UGA’s Innovation District on Dec. 3 in the Peabody Board Room of the Administration Building. The Innovation District Faculty Advisory Council will meet throughout the year to provide input on the Innovation District initiative, with particular focus on programming, resources and support for research commercialization and university-industry engagement. The council will be led by the Innovation District leadership team: Kyle Tschepikow, special assistant to the president and director for strategy and innovation; David Lee, vice president for research; and Rahul Shrivastav, vice president for instruction. The members of the council are: Jenay Beer, Insitute of Gerontology Karen Burg, College of Veterinary Medicine Justin Conrad, School of Public and International Affairs Andrew Crain, Graduate School Joseph Dahlen, Warnell School of Forestry Naola Ferguson-Noel, Poultry Diagnostic and Research Center Chris Garvin, Lamar Dodd School of Art Chris Gerlach, New Media Institute Kristina Jaskyte, Institute for Nonprofit Organizations Kirk Kealey, Food Product Innovation and Commercialization Center Eileen Kennedy, College of Pharmacy William Kisaalita, College of Engineering Kevin McCully, College of Education Sergiy Minko, College of Family and Consumer Sciences Michael Myers, Small Business Development Center Jonathan Murrow, AU/UGA Medical Partnership Usha Rodrigues, School of Law Pejman Rohani, Odum School of Ecology Christine Szymanski, Complex Carbohydrates Research Center Amitabh Verma, College of Environment and Design Dee Warmath, College of Family and Consumer Sciences
  • U.S. Rep. Doug Collins was as pugnacious as ever as he delivered his opening remarks during Wednesday’s House Judiciary Committee hearing on impeachment. The Gainesville Republican repeated his critique that the Democratic-led investigation was primarily fueled by contempt for President Donald Trump. He described the probe as a rushed attempt to ram through charges without evidence that the president had done anything wrong. “This is nothing new, folks; this is sad,” said Collins, the ranking Republican on the committee. There were some points of levity — including when Collins joked about the room’s chilly temperature and uncomfortable chairs — but most of his comments were pointed and biting, both toward the Democrats on the committee and the three constitutional law experts who backed impeachment. Collins also used his opening statement to criticize the decision to invite four constitutional law experts to the hearing, three of whom were recommended by Democrats and one called by Republicans. One of them, Stanford University law professor Pamela Karlan later said she took offense at his insinuation they had not reviewed the House Intelligence Committee’s impeachment report before testifying. “Mr. Collins, I would like to say to you, sir, that I read transcripts of every one of the witnesses who appeared in the live hearing because I would not speak about these things without reviewing the facts,” she said. “So I’m insulted by the suggestion that as a law professor I don’t care about those facts.” Throughout the meeting, Collins and other Republicans forced procedural votes on requests varying from postponing the hearing to requiring House Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam Schiff and an anonymous whistleblower to testify. Democrats, who are in the majority, objected each time.
  • The Athens Symphony will perform the first ever public performance of a new arrangement of “O Holy Night” at their annual Christmas concerts on December 7 and 8.    The piece, arranged by Hollywood film scorer Chad Rehmann, was initially featured in the 2018 film A Christmas Arrangement. Following rave reviews, Rehmann re-arranged the score for orchestral performance and dedicated it to his wife Kari.    “After reaching out to a few regional orchestras known for their holiday concerts,” said Rehmann, “Brad Maffett (Athens Symphony’s Associate Conductor) contacted me expressing interest in performing the work. The more we corresponded, the more excited I became about the Athens Symphony premiering this work, especially given the ensemble’s commitment to family-friendly programming and its focus on a relationship with the Athens community. “   The Symphony will host Rehmann at the December 7 concert with a red-carpet welcome planned for 7:30 p.m.    A Christmas Tradition   A longstanding tradition, the Athens Symphony’s annual Christmas Concerts bring Athenians and Northeast Georgia residents together to celebrate with classic Christmas favorites, a sing-along, and even a visit from Santa.    “The Athens Symphony Christmas Concerts are known for being premier events of the holiday season in our community, bringing people from all walks of life together to celebrate the season,” said Symphony Executive Director Dr Richard Hudson. “It’s a privilege that the Symphony is able to continue its mission of providing free concerts that are open to everyone, knowing that the power of music is a unifying force.”   Complimentary tickets will be available at The Classic Center Box Office beginning Nov. 25 and are required for entry into the concerts, which will be held Saturday, December 7 at 8:00 p.m. and Sunday, December 8 at 3:00 p.m.
  • Oconee County says the new traffic signal at the three-way intersection of Mars Hill, Virgil Langford, and Rocky Branch roads will become operational next week. Crews have been working for the past several weeks to reconfigure the busy intersection off Highway 316.  The Georgia DOT is partnering with Georgia State University to conduct a survey, looking to find out what drivers think about new express lanes on I-85.  MARTA might see rate hikes next year: that word comes from the CEO of the transit system in Atlanta, who tells a state legislative panel that fare revenue is below the 35 percent threshold required to put towards operating expenses. The last time the authority raised the price was in 2011, when the fare for a one-way ticket increased by 50 cents. Any rate hike would take effect next summer. 
  • The Georgia Bulldogs don’t have the only big game this weekend. There is high school playoff football tonight in Watkinsville: the Oconee County Warriors host the Sandy Creek High School Patriots in a game that will kick off at 7:30 tonight in the last game of the season at Warrior Stadium.  Both teams come into the game with 12-1 records. The winner advances to next week’s state championship game. 
  • The Jackson County Sheriff’s Office says its deputies confiscated more than $300,000 worth of methamphetamine this week: US Homeland Security was also in on the arrests of three suspects accused of trafficking more than 25 kilos of meth confiscated in Jefferson. 59 year-old Randy Brown, 58 year-old Tamorah Draper, and 50 year-old Rodney Scott were all booked into the Jackson County jail.  A former Gainesville police officer gets twelve months probation after pleading no contest to a reckless driving charge: Adam Davis is 31 years old, from Cornelia. Davis was arrested last year, accused of driving 90 miles per hour on I-985 in Hall County. Besides the probation, Davis has to pay an $1,100 fine.  Crews worked through the night in Hall County, where a gas tanker overturned on I-985, spilling gasoline on the roadway. Hall County Fire Services says there were no injuries. 
  • The Georgia Bulldogs post-season fate is on the line in Saturday afternoon’s SEC Championship Game in Atlanta: the Dogs take on the LSU Tigers, with a spot in the college football playoffs at stake. The game kicks at 4 o’clock in Mercedes Benz Stadium in Atlanta, with television on CBS. The Bulldogs are 7-point underdogs to the undefeated Tigers. From John Frierson, UGA Sports Communications… All around Vince Dooley's study, there are plaques and paintings and other items from a life spent coaching, leading and learning. There's one honoring the former Georgia football coach and director of athletics' College Football Hall of Fame induction in 1994. There's one marking the start of the Dooley Distinguished Fellows program at UGA in 2018. There are, it seems, dozens more. The most abundant things in the large and comfortable room, already decorated for Christmas — Barbara Dooley has been busy on the Friday morning after Thanksgiving — are bulldogs. There are bulldogs all over the room, particularly in a pair of bookcases that are overflowing with them, as well as other Georgia knickknacks. The bulldogs range from life-sized Uga lookalikes to thimble-sized pieces. 'Somebody kept asking me, 'How many? How many?' So I had two of my grandsons over here and I said, 'You count this side and you count that side,' and there were close to 300 of them,' said Dooley, Georgia's head coach from 1964-1988 and director of athletics from 1979-2004. On Saturday, the beloved Bulldog, a Mobile, Ala., native and former Auburn player and assistant, will be recognized as a member of the 2019 SEC Legends class at the SEC Championship Game at Mercedes-Benz Stadium in Atlanta. It's a fitting honor, one of so many that he's received over the years, for a Georgia legend in every sense of the word. During a post-Thanksgiving Quick Chat, Dooley talked about some other SEC legends, making Athens home for more than 50 years, what's happening in his garden and much more. Here's some of what he had to say:  Frierson: Is there one thing in this room that means the most to you? Dooley: I hadn't thought about that, they're all special in some ways. Of course, the national championship. To have a team that's undefeated, undisputed national champions is special, because it's special to that bunch and special to Frank Ros, who was the captain — the best captain we've ever had. Not only during the season, but he's kept that group together. He's been a real leader with that group and they have remained very close. Frierson: What is a Thanksgiving like at the Dooley household these days? Dooley: Thanksgiving every year, we have been going out to the farm in Madison County. I've got about 300 acres out there and a lake, so I was envisioning spending time out there in retirement. I did for a while, cut paths and got to know the place, but what it has served now is, on two occasions each year, Barbara gets about 60 relatives, kin in some way, I'd say about 55 are hers and five are mine ... and every year we got out there for Thanksgiving lunch. And then we do it for Easter, so those are the two times we get out there. I keep saying this is the time I'm going to spend some more time out there, but I'll take a lap around (the property) and that's about it. Then I'll watch football games. Frierson: You're being recognized as one of the SEC Legends at the championship game. How does that feel? Dooley: I was involved in the start of that, and the idea was that it was supposed to be for the players. I think our first one might have been Billy Payne or Fran Tarkenton, and that was the idea, to recognize those type people. That's what we did for a long time, and all of a sudden they started recognizing coaches, so I think because somebody else was recognizing coaches they thought they ought to recognize me. It's a nice honor and it'll be good. Frierson: When you think about SEC legends in your lifetime, who immediately comes to mind? Besides Herschel Walker, of course. Dooley: Well, you'd have to go back to people you've never heard of [laughs], that was almost two generations ago now, when I was growing up. There was a fellow named Travis Tidwell, who was an Auburn freshman quarterback and I think he made All-American. As a youngster in high school, that was someone I remember.  I remember Harry Gilmer, an Alabama All-American I used to listen to on the radio. I had a scrapbook with guys like Frank Sinkwich and Charley Trippi, like a lot of young kids I kept a scrapbook with the All-Americans in the SEC, so those were some of the ones from when I was younger. Then there were a lot of my own players: Terry Hoage is certainly one; Billy Payne, not only for what he did as a player but a player that has also continued to have a positive influence, he's definitely one of them; Herschel is definitely one of them. There are a lot of them out there. There were also coaches growing up, I had heroes: Bud Wilkinson, John Wooden, as a young coach I studied Coach (Shug) Jordan, who was my coach (at Auburn), but also Bear Bryant and Bobby Dodd. Anybody that's done well, and they all did it in different ways, in different styles, but you studied them and learned from them. And as you get older your heroes expand and I could throw Nelson Mandela in there and a lot of others. Frierson: When did you know that Athens was going to be home forever? Was there ever any thought post-retirement of going down to Florida somewhere or moving anywhere else? Dooley: No, no. My hometown of Mobile would have been the only one that I would have considered. I grew up around the water in my hometown, so I always liked the water because I grew up around it, and if I'd ever thought about retiring somewhere that would have been it. Certainly, I've had a lot of opportunities to move to other places but I would never let it be known because I didn't want my name associated with every job opening. The only two that I ever considered were Oklahoma before you were born, and that's because Bud Wilkinson called me and told me I ought to take a look. And the other was Auburn where I went to school. But by then I'd been here so long, all of my children were here — when I told Derek I was going over to interview, he started crying. He said, 'I hate Auburn, I'm not going to Auburn.' So it made me realize, they're all Georgia, and we'd been here 17 years. I thought about all the players I'd coached and I'd just been here too long.  My roots were deeper (here) and more recent, so I said, this is where we are. Barbara has mixed in with Georgia people all over the state and here in Athens, so there's no better place than right here. Frierson: It's amazing how much Athens and the University of Georgia have grown and changed in your time here. Dooley: I've spent most of my life around a university, 12 years at Auburn and the rest here, and there are certain things that are great benefits of growing up around a university. That is another big reason that we didn't want to go anywhere. The only other town I thought would be nice is Madison (30 miles outside of Athens). I wish we were about 30 minutes closer to the (Atlanta) airport) — that's about the only thing I could say that keeps this from being 100-percent perfect. It's a great town. Frierson: Do you have anything special going on in your garden these days? Dooley: There's something happening all the time, so I've got a garden for all seasons. Whenever you go out there, something is going on. And we're just now on the back end of what has been a great fall color. I've got so many Japanese maples that over a six-week period have got incredible color — some that turned colors early, some after those start to fade, a medium, and then the last of the Mohicans now. Frierson: Speaking of changes, the view of your house from the road has changed dramatically over the years. You used to see a long stretch of lawn and then the house and now there are so many things growing out front that you can't see much of anything. Dooley: Well, I enjoy going out in the garden — it's my golf. I don't have to have a tee time, I can just go out and I enjoy working outside. It's a get-away in that respect, and I enjoy learning. I've always said, the great thing about living around a university is if you've got a curiosity about anything (there are resources available), and that's how I first got into it, because I knew nothing. I tell people I'm an inspiration for anybody that wants to be a gardener late in life, particularly anybody that wants to write a book about something they don't know anything about — I've written a book about gardening as well. Gardening is a learning process, which is a joy, and that's what's great about the university, and then it's good physically. I enjoy working in the yard and I do most of the work — I just get one of my nephews to come help me, that's all — and then it's good for the soul, so I enjoy it. There's a satisfaction when you see it done and you're always looking for another plant to plant somewhere. You're going to run out of space — there are all these things you plant and they look good then, but then they grow. Barbara will look around and say, 'It's a jungle out there! You've got to do something.' Frierson: When you watch football now, how much of it are you still watching through the eyes of a coach and how much of it can you just watch as a fan of the game? Dooley: Well, I can watch in three ways: I can watch as a fan, particularly when I'm watching Georgia; I can also watch as an athletic director, and I also watch as a football coach. So, three ways, and I find myself shifting from one to the other based on what's happening. That ballgame last night (the Ole Miss-Mississippi State Egg Bowl) was entertaining but then I thought about that guy that did that (the Ole Miss player that now-infamously drew an unsportsmanlike conduct penalty after scoring late to cut State's lead to 21-20). You just can't tolerate that, so I found myself watching as an athletic director and a coach and a fan. It was good to see Ole Miss come back and make a great game out of it. When they scored I thought, this is going to be good, going to overtime. Then the guy pulls that, so I immediately become an athletic director and coach that wouldn't tolerate that, and I wouldn't. ... That's what got us into putting in this (no excessive celebration) rule, because it was getting worse and worse. I was chairman of the rules committee when all that was happening and I am very much against it. 
  • The University of Georgia gets a federal grant: UGA says $7.4 million from the Federal Transit Administration will be used to buy 13 new electric buses. From Allison Brannen, UGA Today… The funding, along with UGA’s 30% matching share, will grow the university’s fleet to 33 electric buses, representing a tremendous step forward in reducing emissions and increasing opportunities for experiential learning and research. Twenty electric buses were purchased in April 2019 through a competitive grant from the Georgia State Road and Tollway Authority and are currently in production at the Proterra Inc. plant in Greenville, South Carolina. These buses will begin arriving on campus later this month and are anticipated to go into service this academic year, giving UGA one of the largest electric bus fleets of any university in North America. “The University of Georgia is continually seeking ways to increase the efficiency and sustainability of our campus operations,” said President Jere W. Morehead. “The purchase of additional electric buses with funds from the Federal Transit Administration will help us achieve these important institutional objectives.” Earlier this year, the university built an expandable state-of-the-art charging facility on Riverbend Road to prepare for the electric buses already scheduled to arrive on campus. With this infrastructure in place, the FTA grant funding will be used to purchase electric buses without the need for additional charging capacity. A fleet of 33 electric buses will significantly lower life-cycle costs for the university. The expected useful life of electric buses far exceeds the 12-year standard for diesel buses. Fuel costs will decrease by approximately 90%, and with no internal combustion engine or transmission, maintenance costs will be drastically reduced as well.  Having a large fleet of electric buses on campus also creates opportunities for faculty and students to use field assets in their research and studies. UGA Auxiliary Services has partnered with the College of Engineering to work with four student teams as they complete capstone projects related to electric bus technology. Auxiliary Services also has partnered with the college on proposals for two transportation-related National Science Foundation grants. These projects have the potential to advance electric bus technology and improve lives through better transportation worldwide. “The positive benefits that come from receiving this grant are remarkable,” said Robert Holden, associate vice president for Auxiliary Services. “In addition to reducing costs and contributing to research, advancing electric bus technology on our campus will allow us to provide better, cleaner transportation for the community by significantly reducing the university’s greenhouse gas emissions.” The additional buses are anticipated to be purchased within the next year.

Local News

  • ATLANTA Georgia football got the AllState Sugar Bowl invitation everyone expected and will face Baylor at 8:45 p.m. on Jan. 1 in New Orleans. The No. 5-ranked Bulldogs (11-2) are making a repeat trip to Mercedes-Benz Superdome, where last year they came off an SEC Championship Game loss and were defeated by Texas, 28-21. Big 12 runner-up Baylor (11-2) is coming off a 30-23 overtime loss to College Football Playoff semifinalist Oklahoma on Saturday. This marks the fifth time the Bulldogs and the Bears have met, UGA holding a 4-0 series lead with all four prior meetings taking place in Athens. This marks Georgia's 10th Sugar Bowl appearance and fourth in the past 18 years. The Bulldogs have played in the Sugar Bowl more than any other postseason game. It's a rich history that includes the program's most recent national championship, a 17-10 win over Notre Dame on Jan. 1, 1981. Kirby Smart's current Bulldogs entered this season with national championship aspirations, but injuries took a toll, particularly in the receiver ranks where there was already heavy attrition. Georgia lost its top five pass catchers from the 2018 season, and the passing game took a major hit when go-to target Lawrence Cager suffered shoulder, rib and ankle injuries the second half of the season. Freshman Dominick Blaylock, another of the Bulldogs top targets, suffered a season-ending knee injury in the 37-20 SEC Championship Game loss o LSU on Saturday. Blaylock has a torn ACL. Georgia also figures to be without junior tailback D'Andre Swift, who was limited to five touches in the SEC title game on account of a shoulder injury. Swift is expected to declare himself eligible for the NFL Draft and not play in the bowl game. Bulldogs' junior All-American left tackle Andrew Thomas is also headed tor the NFL Draft, but Thomas might still decide to play in the Sugar Bowl as he has maintained his health throughout the season. DawgNation Georgia football D'Andre Swift discusses limits and pain in SEC Championship Jake Fromm makes no excuses after defeat in SEC Championship Game What's next for Georgia football: Bowl bid, players leaving, staff changes WATCH: Kirby Smart sheds light on LSU, Jake Fromm passing issues Bulldogs stock report, LSU crashes Mercedes-Benz Stadium How LSU beat Georgia in SEC title game, scoring, injuries The post Georgia football lands Sugar Bowl bid, aims for sweet ending against Baylor appeared first on DawgNation.
  • Joe Burrow collected a shiny award as the game's MVP. LSU's fans had another trophy on their minds. 'Heisman! Heisman! Heisman!' they chanted. The coronation is likely complete. Burrow turned in another dazzling performance on the big stage, leading No. 1 LSU to a spot in the College Football Playoff with a 37-10 rout of No. 4 Georgia in the Southeastern Conference championship game Saturday. “Joe is the heartbeat of this team,” running back Clyde Edwards-Helaire said. The Tigers, going for their first national title since 2007 season, will either return to Atlanta or head west to suburban Phoenix for a semifinal game on Dec. 28. They surely made a persuasive case to be the top overall seed when the four-team field. and pairings are announced Sunday. Burrow was all over the stat sheet for LSU (13-0, No. 2 CFP). He threw for 349 yards and four touchdowns. He was the Tigers' second-leading rusher with 41 yards on 11 carries, often leaving the Bulldogs grasping at air as he twirled this way and that. He even caught a pass on a ball that was batted down at the line and wound up his arms, taking off for a 16-yard gain. ''He's a great athlete, man,' Georgia safety J.R. Reed said. “We had a lot of plays out there we were supposed to make, and he'd just squeeze out of it.' The Heisman-worthy moment came late in the third quarter. With Georgia (11-2, No 4 CFP) bringing the heat, Burrow spun to his left to get away from lineman Travon Walker, whirled back to his right to send Walker sprawling to the turf, then delivered a pass on the run while sprinting toward the LSU sideline with another defender in hot pursuit. Justin Jefferson hauled in the throw just beyond midfield and took off down to the Bulldogs 9 for a 71-yard play. Three plays later, Burrow delivered his third TD pass of the game, hooking up with Terrace Marshall Jr., on a 4-yard touchdown pass that essentially finished off the Bulldogs. “It was all improvised,” Burrow said. “Justin ran a 6-yard hitch route and saw me scrambling and took off deep. We got a great feel for each other. I knew exactly where he was going to be when I got out of there.” Burrow wasn't done. Derek Stingley's second pick of Jake Fromm turned the ball back over to the prolific LSU offense at the 13, and Burrow wasted no time finding Jefferson for an 8-yard TD in the waning seconds of the third quarter to send many in the predominantly Georgia crowd heading for the exits. LSU left no doubt it is the king of the mighty SEC, completing its run through a gauntlet of the league's top teams. The Tigers had already knocked off Alabama, Florida and Auburn. Now, they can add the Bulldogs to the list, ensuring the SEC will only get one team in the national playoff. LSU came into the game as the second-highest scoring team in the country behind Ohio State. They figured to have a tougher time against Georgia's stellar defense, ranked No. 2 in points allowed. but Burrow kept the Bulldogs on their heels the entire game. It was by far the most points Georgia has given up their season. Until Saturday, they held every opponent under 20 except South Carolina, which stunned the Bulldogs in double overtime nearly two months ago. There was no such drama in this one. Just total domination by the Tigers. It was a painful loss — literally — for the Bulldogs, who were making their third straight appearance in the SEC title game. Two players were carted off the field with apparently major injuries. Another player wobbled off with a concussion after being leveled on a kickoff. Fromm twisted an ankle and had to go to the medical tent to get taped up, though he missed only one play. Not that it mattered. Fromm, who guided Georgia to the cusp of the national title two years ago as a freshman, was 20 of 42 for 225 yards with those two interceptions. He didn't get much help from his teammates: Tyler Simmons dropped a deep ball on the very first possession, and Matt Landers couldn't hang on to a throw in the end zone. Georgia finally reached the end zone with just under 12 minutes remaining on Fromm's 2-yard TD pass to George Pickens. “That is a really good football team,” coach Kirby Smart said. “We were going to have to make explosive plays. We were unable to do that.” INJURY REPORT Georgia's sideline looked like a M(asterisk)A(asterisk)S(asterisk)H unit. Receiver Dominick Blaylock crumpled to the turf after going up for a catch in the first quarter. He was carted to the locker room with a left knee injury. Outside linebacker Walter Grant suffered a concussion in the third quarter from a special teams hit. LSU’s Tory Carter was ejected for targeting. Backup middle linebacker Quay Walker (right shoulder) and cornerback Tyrique Stevenson (apparent leg injury) also left the field with injuries. Star running back D'Andre Swift clearly wasn't at full strength, either, after going out of the regular-season finale against Georgia Tech with should injury. He had just two carries for 13 yards. THE TAKEAWAY LSU: The Tigers could certainly take pride in putting up 481 yards on a defense of Georgia's caliber, but the most encouraging aspect of this game was another strong performance from LSU's defense. Maligned much of the season, they followed up a 50-7 rout of Texas A&M in the regular-season finale with another championship-worthy showing against the Bulldogs, who were held to 286 yards. Georgia: Fromm came into the season projected as a high NFL draft pick who would likely go pro after his junior season. Now, it's not a reach to say he might be better off returning for his senior season to try to boost his stock. He has now failed to complete even half his passes in five straight games. UP NEXT LSU: Makes its first appearance in the College Football Playoff, which began in 2014. The Tigers last played for a national title during the 2011 season, when they won 13 straight games before a dismal 21-0 loss to Alabama in the BCS championship game. Georgia: Appears likely to make its second straight appearance in the Sugar Bowl against Baylor, loser of the Big 12 championship game. ___ More AP college football: https://apnews.com/Collegefootball and https://twitter.com/AP_Top25 ___ Follow Paul Newberry on Twitter at www.twitter.com/pnewberry1963 His work can be found at https://apnews.com
  • 21 faculty members across UGA’s schools and colleges met to discuss the development of UGA’s Innovation District on Dec. 3 in the Peabody Board Room of the Administration Building. The Innovation District Faculty Advisory Council will meet throughout the year to provide input on the Innovation District initiative, with particular focus on programming, resources and support for research commercialization and university-industry engagement. The council will be led by the Innovation District leadership team: Kyle Tschepikow, special assistant to the president and director for strategy and innovation; David Lee, vice president for research; and Rahul Shrivastav, vice president for instruction. The members of the council are: Jenay Beer, Insitute of Gerontology Karen Burg, College of Veterinary Medicine Justin Conrad, School of Public and International Affairs Andrew Crain, Graduate School Joseph Dahlen, Warnell School of Forestry Naola Ferguson-Noel, Poultry Diagnostic and Research Center Chris Garvin, Lamar Dodd School of Art Chris Gerlach, New Media Institute Kristina Jaskyte, Institute for Nonprofit Organizations Kirk Kealey, Food Product Innovation and Commercialization Center Eileen Kennedy, College of Pharmacy William Kisaalita, College of Engineering Kevin McCully, College of Education Sergiy Minko, College of Family and Consumer Sciences Michael Myers, Small Business Development Center Jonathan Murrow, AU/UGA Medical Partnership Usha Rodrigues, School of Law Pejman Rohani, Odum School of Ecology Christine Szymanski, Complex Carbohydrates Research Center Amitabh Verma, College of Environment and Design Dee Warmath, College of Family and Consumer Sciences
  • U.S. Rep. Doug Collins was as pugnacious as ever as he delivered his opening remarks during Wednesday’s House Judiciary Committee hearing on impeachment. The Gainesville Republican repeated his critique that the Democratic-led investigation was primarily fueled by contempt for President Donald Trump. He described the probe as a rushed attempt to ram through charges without evidence that the president had done anything wrong. “This is nothing new, folks; this is sad,” said Collins, the ranking Republican on the committee. There were some points of levity — including when Collins joked about the room’s chilly temperature and uncomfortable chairs — but most of his comments were pointed and biting, both toward the Democrats on the committee and the three constitutional law experts who backed impeachment. Collins also used his opening statement to criticize the decision to invite four constitutional law experts to the hearing, three of whom were recommended by Democrats and one called by Republicans. One of them, Stanford University law professor Pamela Karlan later said she took offense at his insinuation they had not reviewed the House Intelligence Committee’s impeachment report before testifying. “Mr. Collins, I would like to say to you, sir, that I read transcripts of every one of the witnesses who appeared in the live hearing because I would not speak about these things without reviewing the facts,” she said. “So I’m insulted by the suggestion that as a law professor I don’t care about those facts.” Throughout the meeting, Collins and other Republicans forced procedural votes on requests varying from postponing the hearing to requiring House Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam Schiff and an anonymous whistleblower to testify. Democrats, who are in the majority, objected each time.
  • The Athens Symphony will perform the first ever public performance of a new arrangement of “O Holy Night” at their annual Christmas concerts on December 7 and 8.    The piece, arranged by Hollywood film scorer Chad Rehmann, was initially featured in the 2018 film A Christmas Arrangement. Following rave reviews, Rehmann re-arranged the score for orchestral performance and dedicated it to his wife Kari.    “After reaching out to a few regional orchestras known for their holiday concerts,” said Rehmann, “Brad Maffett (Athens Symphony’s Associate Conductor) contacted me expressing interest in performing the work. The more we corresponded, the more excited I became about the Athens Symphony premiering this work, especially given the ensemble’s commitment to family-friendly programming and its focus on a relationship with the Athens community. “   The Symphony will host Rehmann at the December 7 concert with a red-carpet welcome planned for 7:30 p.m.    A Christmas Tradition   A longstanding tradition, the Athens Symphony’s annual Christmas Concerts bring Athenians and Northeast Georgia residents together to celebrate with classic Christmas favorites, a sing-along, and even a visit from Santa.    “The Athens Symphony Christmas Concerts are known for being premier events of the holiday season in our community, bringing people from all walks of life together to celebrate the season,” said Symphony Executive Director Dr Richard Hudson. “It’s a privilege that the Symphony is able to continue its mission of providing free concerts that are open to everyone, knowing that the power of music is a unifying force.”   Complimentary tickets will be available at The Classic Center Box Office beginning Nov. 25 and are required for entry into the concerts, which will be held Saturday, December 7 at 8:00 p.m. and Sunday, December 8 at 3:00 p.m.

Bulldog News

  • ATHENS Georgia has opened as a 7 1/2-point favorite over Baylor in the AllState Sugar Bowl Game, according to VegasInsider.com. The No. 5-ranked Bulldogs (11-2) and No. 7 Bears (11-2) are both coming off losses in their respective conference championship games. Georgia got manhandled by No. 1-ranked LSU, falling 37-10 in Mercedes-Benz Stadium in Atlanta on Saturday. Baylor, meanwhile, lost its rematch with No. 4 Oklahoma in overtime, falling 30-23 to the Sooners at . The Bulldogs could be without some marquee players in the Sugar Bowl. Junior tailback D'Andre Swift has been dealing with an injured shoulder that led him to a limited role against LSU. Swift, who has indicated he will declare himself eligible for the upcoming NFL draft, had just two carries and three catches, none after the first series of the third quarter. Georgia junior offensive tackle Andrew Thomas is widely projected as a Top 10 pick, but Thomas seemed to leave the door open to playing following Saturday night's loss in Atlanta. Smart said he learned last season to only bring the players to the bowl site who are 'engaged' and want to be there. 'Bottom line is, it's your job to go play in a football game, and you get a great opportunity,' Smart said on the Sunday night Sugar Bowl teleconference. 'There's a lot of teams all across the country that would be dying to play in a game like this, he said. 'We're gonna sell it that way. It's a once in lifetime opportunity to be Sugar Bowl champs. 'We're going to take the ones that want to do that and want to play well.' The Bulldogs will also be without two of their top three receivers, both sidelined by injuries. Graduate transfer Lawrence Cager underwent ankle surgery on Nov. 29 and is in the early stages of recovery. Freshman Dominick Blaylock suffered a torn ACL in the first half of the SEC Championship Game and will be aiming for the start of fall drills. Smart is also dealing with a coaching vacancy, with celebrated offensive line coach Sam Pittman taking the Arkansas head coaching job on Sunday night. SEC bowl games Dec. 27, Academy Spors & Outdoors Texas Bowl, Houston Texas A&M -5 over Oklahoma State Dec. 28, Chick-fil-A Peach Bowl, CFP Playoff Semifinal, Atlanta LSU -13 over Oklahoma Dec. 30, Franklin American Mortgage Music City Bowl, Nashville Mississippi State vs. Louisville, no line yet Dec. 30, Capital One Orange Bowl, Miami Florida 13 1/2 over Virginia Dec. 31, Belk Bowl, Charlotte Kentucky vs. Virginia Tech, no line yet Jan. 1, Outback Bowl, Tampa Auburn 7 1/2 over Minnesota Jan. 1 VRBO Citrus Bowl, Orlando Alabama -7 over Michigan Jan. 1 All State Sugar Bowl, New Orleans Georgia -7 1/2 over Baylor Jan. 2 TaxSlayer Gator Bowl, Jacksonville Tennessee vs. Indiana, no line yet The post Georgia football favored by more than a touchdown over Baylor in Sugar Bowl appeared first on DawgNation.
  • ATHENS The Georgia football program is spinning around Kirby Smart with the possibility of coaches and players coming or going. The Bulldogs' head coach, fresh off his fourth regular season, remains calm in the center of it all. Smart, master of time management, has his to-do list in order and seems to be taking the approach the chips will fall where they may in the aftermath of an 11-2 season that has his program ranked No. 5 and headed for the Sugar Bowl to play Baylor. Smart calmly addressed Sunday reports that celebrated offensive line coach Sam Pittman could be headed for Arkansas as the Razorbacks head coach when asked by DawgNation on the Sunday night Sugar Bowl teleconference. 'You always hear rumors flying around and different things, and you don't know what to be true and what's not,' Smart said. 'Right now, we're focused on the Sugar Bowl and getting ready for it.' A source at Arkansas told DawgNation on Sunday night that Arkansas has had several candidates fall through, and that Pittman is indeed in play. Smart said he doesn't have a clear idea of which players will be traveling to New Orleans to play the No. 7-ranked Bears in the 8:45 p.m. game on Jan. 1 at the Mercedes-Benz Dome. Smart confirmed that receiver Dominick Blaylock (ACL) is out for the season. Smart also said it's 'very doubtful' that grad-transfer Lawrence Cager will be healed up from the ankle surgery he underwent on Nov. 29. The other Georgia players who were knocked out of the SEC Championship Game are expected to be back, Smart said. The Bulldogs have a handful of underclassmen, however, who could be leaving early for the NFL draft and may elect not to play in the game. 'That's obviously a fluid situation, I think we'll find out more as it comes about,' Smart said. 'Guys really haven't had time to sit back and evaluate where they are and get information. We really only had one last year, and that was Deandre Baker. '(So) I don't know where that will fall, and I'm really not concerned with that right now as much as I am finishing up final exams, and finishing up recruiting, and then getting started on Baylor.' Junior tailback D'Andre Swift is not expected to play in the Sugar Bowl, while offensive tackle Andrew Thomas has left the possibility open. Junior quarterback Jake Fromm and junior safety Richard LeCounte are other underclassmen who could be considering declaring early for the NFL draft. But, as Smart suggested, players are still in the process of getting NFL draft grades to help them make better-informed decisions. 'What I found out last year was that for a lot of kids, it was the most important game of their season and meant so much to them,and then maybe for some others it didn't,' Smart said. 'You've got to take the guys that are engaged and excited about playing, because that matters a whole lot more than how good they are.' The post Kirby Smart at center of whirlwind: Stays on point amid coaching rumors, player attrition appeared first on DawgNation.
  • Lewis Cine got his first chance to speak to the media at Georgia on Saturday night after the loss to LSU in the SEC championship game. It allowed a DawgNation correspondent to unravel the answer to a few 2019 mysteries involving Cine. It wasn't just how the Under Armour 2019 All-American has worked himself into a regular contributor this fall. Cine is one of just six Bulldog freshmen to play in every game this year. With Cine, the biggest question coming in could have been in regard to his jersey choice. Or choices. Was he No. 8? Or No. 16? Or No. 28? Cine wore that No. 28 earlier this year when he picked off the first pass of his Georgia career. ( For the record, he's No. 16. Definitely.) Did he have a certain number for road games? Home games? Was it his destiny to befuddle play-by-play announcers with the unique phonetics of his last name (Sounds like 'Scene' as in the movies) AND his revolving door of jersey numbers in 2019? Those were all good thoughts coming in, but all of that went out of the wayside as he started his first game as a Bulldog against LSU. He had to because his unique blend of size, speed, skills and smarts made him the perfect extra defender to stay on the field to try and half Heisman favorite Joe Burrow and that prolific LSU offense. Cine tied for the team-best totals in tackles against LSU. That furthered the notion that if both fans and those play-by-play TV guys don't have the phonetics of his last name down yet, then they will soon. Georgia employed seven defensive backs early in the game to try and keep those receivers hemmed in. Mark Webb Jr. was in the game as usual. But that challenge meant that both Cine and another highly-touted and successful freshman in Tyrique Stevenson also started his first career game. The platter was full by then of material to cover with Boston native by way of Texas. And then the sky bump happened. Cine made a play. Scooped up an apparent early LSU fumble and his head coach wanted to meet him for a tap about nine feet in the air. That's when Kirby Smart also looked like a man who made a lot of big plays at safety for Georgia. Except maybe one that was coming up fast on his 44th birthday. 'Kirby whenever us players make a big play he's a player's coach,' Cine said. 'He's always going to want to celebrate with us. But I didn't think he would fall like that.' It appears that Cine was a little too jacked about helping his team and putting those spiked savage shoulder pads on again. 'I think I got a little too high and came with a little too much energy,' he said. 'Then he fell like a pile of bricks. I didn't think that.' RELATED: Check out the reason why Lewis Cine will always wear No. 16 at Georgia Lewis Cine: His thoughts on his first season at Georgia Burrow was tough to deal with on Saturday. 'Joe Burrow makes it very tough to cover,' he said. 'Because he extends a lot of plays with his legs. You have got to give him credit. He's a really good player. He made a lot of plays that we didn't think he was going to make with his legs. The whole plan was to cover the guys but hen he got around us and made some plays.' He is going forward from that LSU game with his eyes on making an even bigger contribution to the defense in 2020. J.R. Reed, the brilliant three-year starting safety, will be in the NFL. Junior talent Richard LeCounte III will also have some thinking to do about that subject, too. 'I've got a lot for J.R. and a lot of respect for Rich,' Cine said. 'I watch what they do. The plays they make and I learn from that. Even mistakes they might have made, they told me Lew don't do that' and Learn from this' and I'm hoping really to fill in some big footsteps.' What else did Cine have to say? Check out his answers in his DawgNation conversation in the featured video atop this post. How does he assess his freshman year? Cine's thoughts on his progression for his sophomore year Why his number changes were part of being a team player with his special teams duty in 2019 What does he have to do to get better? What makes him feel like Georgia can return to the SEC championship game in 2020? The Day after on DawgNation: LSU 37, Georgia 10 Beloved Georgia line coach Sam Pittman emerging as a leading candidate at Arkansas Georgia accepts potential sweet ending to the season with Sugar Bowl bid What did Nolan Smith say about his first year at UGA? The news is as feared for freshman WR Dominick Blaylock Travon Walker shares his thoughts on his first season as a Bulldog LSU gets No. 1 playoff seed, Bulldogs await likely Sugar Bowl bid Bill King: Georgia couldn't keep up with a great LSU team Georgia slips in polls but remains seen as a national powerhouse Joe Burrow says the Georgia defense forced his scrambles WATCH: D'Andre Swift slowed by a lot of pain against LSU Report card: Georgia fails test against LSU The post WATCH: Talented freshmen safety Lewis Cine knows his time is coming soon appeared first on DawgNation.
  • ATLANTA Georgia football got the AllState Sugar Bowl invitation everyone expected and will face Baylor at 8:45 p.m. on Jan. 1 in New Orleans. The No. 5-ranked Bulldogs (11-2) are making a repeat trip to Mercedes-Benz Superdome, where last year they came off an SEC Championship Game loss and were defeated by Texas, 28-21. Big 12 runner-up Baylor (11-2) is coming off a 30-23 overtime loss to College Football Playoff semifinalist Oklahoma on Saturday. This marks the fifth time the Bulldogs and the Bears have met, UGA holding a 4-0 series lead with all four prior meetings taking place in Athens. This marks Georgia's 10th Sugar Bowl appearance and fourth in the past 18 years. The Bulldogs have played in the Sugar Bowl more than any other postseason game. It's a rich history that includes the program's most recent national championship, a 17-10 win over Notre Dame on Jan. 1, 1981. Kirby Smart's current Bulldogs entered this season with national championship aspirations, but injuries took a toll, particularly in the receiver ranks where there was already heavy attrition. Georgia lost its top five pass catchers from the 2018 season, and the passing game took a major hit when go-to target Lawrence Cager suffered shoulder, rib and ankle injuries the second half of the season. Freshman Dominick Blaylock, another of the Bulldogs top targets, suffered a season-ending knee injury in the 37-20 SEC Championship Game loss o LSU on Saturday. Blaylock has a torn ACL. Georgia also figures to be without junior tailback D'Andre Swift, who was limited to five touches in the SEC title game on account of a shoulder injury. Swift is expected to declare himself eligible for the NFL Draft and not play in the bowl game. Bulldogs' junior All-American left tackle Andrew Thomas is also headed tor the NFL Draft, but Thomas might still decide to play in the Sugar Bowl as he has maintained his health throughout the season. DawgNation Georgia football D'Andre Swift discusses limits and pain in SEC Championship Jake Fromm makes no excuses after defeat in SEC Championship Game What's next for Georgia football: Bowl bid, players leaving, staff changes WATCH: Kirby Smart sheds light on LSU, Jake Fromm passing issues Bulldogs stock report, LSU crashes Mercedes-Benz Stadium How LSU beat Georgia in SEC title game, scoring, injuries The post Georgia football lands Sugar Bowl bid, aims for sweet ending against Baylor appeared first on DawgNation.
  • ATLANTA Georgia football didn't get the SEC Championship Game win it was aiming for this season, but the Bulldogs clearly earned some respect. Georgia finished No. 5 in the final AP Top 25 and Coaches' regular-season polls. UGA is the highest-ranked two-loss team on the heels of a 37-10 loss to No. 1-ranked LSU on Saturday. It was Georgia's third straight trip to the SEC Championship Game. UGA soldiered through an injury filled season to score marquee wins over Top 15 teams Notre Dame, Auburn and Florida. The Bulldogs are expected to receive a Sugar Bowl bid. The New Year's Six Bowl played annually in New Orleans features the top ranked teams from the SEC and Big 12 that aren't a part of the College Football Playoff. Baylor (11-2) is the top-ranked team from the Big 12, No. 8 in both the AP Top 25 and the Coaches' Poll. The SEC has five of the top 10 ranked teams in the AP Top 25, with LSU No. 1, Georgia No. 5, Florida No. 7 and Alabama and Auburn tied at No. 9. AP Poll Top 25 Week 16 rankings Ranking Team Record 1 LSU 13-0 2 Ohio State 13-0 3 Clemson 13-0 4 Oklahoma 12-1 5 Georgia 11-2 6 Florida 10-2 7 Oregon 11-2 8 Baylor 11-2 Tie-9 Alabama 10-2 Tie-9. Auburn 9-3 11 Wisconsin 10-3 12 Utah 11-2 13 Penn State 10-2 14 Notre Dame 10-2 15 Memphis 12-1 16 Minnesota 10-2 17 Michigan 9-3 18 Boise State 12-1 19 Iowa 9-3 20 App State 11-1 21 Navy 9-2 22 USC 8-4 23 Cincinnati 10-3 24 Air Force 10-2 25 Oklahoma State 8-4 Coaches Poll Top 25 Week 16 rankings Ranking Team Record 1 LSU 13-0 2 Ohio State 13-0 3 Clemson 13-0 4 Oklahoma 12-1 5 Georgia 11-2 6 Oregon 11-2 7 Florida 10-2 8 Baylor 11-2 9 Alabama 10-2 10 Utah 11-2 11 Wisconsin 10-3 12 Penn State 10-2 13 Auburn 9-3 14 Notre Dame 10-2 15 Memphis 12-1 16 Minnesota 10-2 17 Michigan 9-3 18 Boise State 12-1 19 Iowa 9-3 20 App State 12-1 21 Navy 9-2 22 Cincinnati 10-3 23 USC 8-4 24 Air Force 10-2 25 Virginia 9-4 The post Georgia football slips in polls but remains among national powerhouses appeared first on DawgNation.