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    The University of Georgia is ranked 13th in the nation for the number of students who study abroad, according to the latest Open Doors ranking from Institute of International Education. UGA was one of only two Southeastern Conference universities and the only institution in Georgia to be ranked in the top 20. Every year, with the backing of the U.S. Department of State’s Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs, IIE conducts a survey on U.S. students studying abroad for academic credit and publishes the results in the Open Doors Report. In addition to ranking 13th overall, UGA was ninth in short-term study abroad programs. “We at the Office of Global Engagement are thankful to the UGA leadership for the support of student global experiential learning,” said Yana Cornish, director of global education. “We are proud to support a culture of study abroad among students, faculty and staff and are committed to expanding global experiential learning opportunities to all students, with particular consideration for underrepresented, rural, first-generation and other underserved students.” More than 2,600 UGA undergraduate and graduate students studied abroad in programs facilitated UGA Office of Global Engagement during the 2017-2018 academic year. “UGA’s position in the national rankings reflects the growing demand among students for a study abroad experience, the increased availability of scholarship funding provided by the university and individual donors, and the tireless dedication of our faculty, who are committed to offering academically rigorous programs,” said Noel Fallows, associate provost for the Office of Global Engagement. “Although many of our programs take place during the summer months, they are a year-round commitment for faculty, who work behind the scenes developing cost-effective budgets and preparing culturally immersive courses to create optimal, memorable and transformative international experiences.” Jack Hu, the university’s senior vice president for academic affairs and provost, added that UGA’s Open Doors ranking underscores the institution’s stature as a national leader in experiential learning. “The University of Georgia is one of the nation’s largest public universities to ensure that all of our undergraduate students benefit from learning opportunities such as study abroad, internships, service-learning and research,” Hu said. “These experiences position students for career success and lay the foundation for a lifetime of engaged citizenship.” Additional information on all UGA Education Abroad programs are available on the StudyAway portal: https://studyaway.uga.edu/
  • ATHENS Georgia basketball has made it a historical start to the season with Wednesday night's 82-78 win over rival Georgia Tech. It was the Bulldogs' fifth-straight win in the series, the first time that has happened in 79 years, and the 10,205 fans at Stegeman Coliseum couldn't have been more happy. 'This is a huge rivalry,' Georgia coach Tom Crean said. 'I said to the team, there are gong to be things in life that are so much bigger than you, and a game like this is one of them. 'When those seniors can say they never lost those games, that's a big deal.' Junior Rayshaun Hammonds carried the load for the Bulldogs (4-0), matching his season high with 26 points while pulling down 9 rebounds against the Yellow Jackets (2-1). Projected NBA lottery pick Anthony Edwards had 18 points and 8 rebounds, and senior grad-transfer Donnell Gresham Jr. had 13 points and 6 rebounds. Edwards, of course, made history by scoring 53 points in his first two games, eclipsing the freshman record previously held by Georgia and NBA Great Dominique Wilkins (1979). Michael Devoe had 34 points including a last-second, half-court shot to lead Georgia Tech. The Yellow Jackets opened the Nov. 5 with an 82-81 overtime road win over North Carolina State. Hammonds dominated the first half, scoring 19 of his points through the first 20 minutes. It carried into the second half with Georgia leading by as many as 16 points. 'It's a big win for us,' Hammonds said. 'I haven't lost to them, I don't want to lose to them.' A degree of uncertainty crept into the building with 10:15 remaining, however, when Hammonds picked up his fourth foul while scrambling for a loose ball. Hammonds took his 26 points and 8 rebounds to the bench, and Crean and the Bulldogs turned to freshman Anthony 'Antman' Edwards. Edwards, 1-of-8 shooting to that point with 5 points, drained a 3-pointer on the next trip down to make it 59-48 a the 9:41 mark. It triggered a 10-2 run that Edwards capped with a drive to the basket that made it 66-50. 'We did a good job on Edwards, he made some big plays late,' Georgia Tech coach Josh Pastner said. 'He's a pro, he's going to be one of the top 3 draft picks, pros do that.' The Bulldogs had used a 13-2 run to end the first half and take control of what had been a back-and-forth first half, leading 35-27 intermission. Edwards had just 2 points at the half, and he didn't score his first field goal until hitting a long jumper that made it 42-31 with 17:50 left. The Bulldogs fans came to life, and it was another big crowd. Georgia, in fact, has the second-largest season attendance in school history through four games (35,152), approaching the record set in 1981 when Stegeman Coliseum held 11,200 and drew 38,741 through its first four games. More history will be made when Georgia returns to action at 2:30 p.m. next Monday in the Maui Invitational against Dayton (TV: ESPN2). The Bulldogs, making their first-ever appearance in the prestigious will play again on Tuesday (Michigan State or Virginia Tech) and Wednesday (TBD). DawgNation Georgia basketball coverage Georgia overwhelms Delaware State, Rayshaun Hammonds stars UGA drops The Citadel, Anthony Edwards scores 29 Anthony Edwards having fun, but Tom Crean expects more Tom Crean wants more control against The Citadel RELATED: Anthony Edwards draws standing ovation in opener Georgia basketball strikes exhibition gold vs. Charlotte 49ers Sahvir Wheeler hidden star, directs point after first exhibition Anthony Edwards lives up to hype in exhibition opener Georgia freshman already making basketball history The post Georgia basketball off to historic start, dumps Georgia Tech 82-78 appeared first on DawgNation.
  • ATHENS — A faint, round, red spot just above his shirt collar is the only obvious physical evidence that something happened to Tate Prezzano nearly seven months ago. However, inside the University of Georgia student’s body a bullet fragment remains lodged just one millimeter from his spinal cord after he was shot multiple times near campus.  “One millimeter. One ‘mm.’ It is the smallest measurement you can get in the metric system,” his father, Dobbin Prezzano, said. To Prezzano and his father, the abbreviation “1 mm” has taken on a new meaning: “One man’s mission,” the tagline for the new foundation and scholarship program Tate Prezzano created in the wake of the shooting.  Prezzano introduced the foundation Wednesday morning at a news conference at Piedmont Athens Regional Medical Center, the hospital where he underwent his medical treatment after the shooting. It was the 22-year-old’s first public appearance since the April 22 incident. Prezzano said the focus of his foundation, named the TateTough Foundation after the social media hashtag that began trending during his recovery, is to effect safety and security on college campuses.  RELATED: UGA victim ID’d as lacrosse player; police release sketch of alleged shooter Prezzano is part of UGA’s club lacrosse team and played lacrosse and football at Cambridge High School in Milton.  As the junior communications major was waiting at an Athens bus stop, a man approached him, robbed him and shot him multiple times in the upper part of his body. “Few incidents are more concerning than a young man standing at the bus stop, waiting to go to college, that is accosted by an armed assailant, robbed and shot,” Athens-Clarke County police Chief Cleveland Spruill said in a news conference after the shooting.  It happened about 7:15 a.m. the Monday after Easter, Prezzano said. His bus was scheduled to arrive at 7:18 a.m.  He said he saw something move out of the corner of his eye, and when he looked up a man was pointing a gun at him.  Prezzano was hit in the shoulder, in the neck and in the back of the head. He laid bleeding on the sidewalk, watching cars go by and hoping one would stop.  “I actually saw my bus go by,” he said.  One man pulled over. Phil Haymore, who manages the intensive care unit at Piedmont Athens, was on his way to work when he saw Prezzano on the ground.  “I have a son at UGA. He’s right around Tate’s age,” Haymore said. “As far as I’m concerned, my son was laying on the sidewalk.”  Haymore provided care for Prezzano until emergency medical services arrived and took him to the hospital. He remained there for six days.   A second UGA student was also robbed at gunpoint near the bus stop, which is just south of campus and the Athens Perimeter. That student was not hurt in the incident, which occurred moments before Prezzano was shot. He was able to give police a description of the suspect, which was used to create a sketch. It depicted a man with medium-length braids or dreads. Not long after the sketch was released, GBI special agent Mike Ayers said tips started pouring in from community members. MORE: Gwinnett man arrested in shooting of UGA lacrosse player from metro Atlanta Zarren Garner, 20, of Grayson, was arrested in Gwinnett County the next morning. Spruill said they were able to identify Garner through a number of citizen tips and because of the man’s prior “low-level criminal background.”  Thus began Tate Prezzano’s recovery process. He said he spent about five days a week in physical therapy over the summer. He wasn’t able to take summer classes for his major.  “His typical regimen over the summer of academics and athletics ... was going to be replaced by physical therapy, occupational therapy, aquatic therapy,” his father said.  The foundation is part of Prezzano’s recovery process. The first pillar of its three-part mission is to support Prezzano throughout his doctor visits, therapy sessions and various treatments.  The second part, Prezzano said, is to encourage other athletes.  “Our goal is to promote funding for scholarships at two schools that have been an integral part of and made an impression on Tate: The University of Georgia and Cambridge High School,” the TateTough website said. “The Foundation will award a $1,000 scholarship to one University of Georgia lacrosse player and one Cambridge High School athlete each year that the Foundation can support the effort.”  “This scholarship is going to go to the person (we) feel exemplifies what the ultimate teammate would be,” Prezzano said. “The ultimate teammate, in my opinion, is not necessarily the ‘rah-rah’ guy. It’s not necessarily the all-star or the best player. He’s the kind of person that would come off the field if he needs to, he would go on the field and play a different position, or just kind of do whatever is asked and be reliable.”  But invaluable to the TateTough Foundation is the need to augment campus safety, Prezzano said. The foundation is working with UGA to explore options to make the campus safer, such as improved kiosks and phone apps that would allow for a more immediate response in the case of an emergency. Campus safety is at the top of his mind now that Prezzano has resumed taking classes at UGA.   He is still undergoing physical therapy three times a week. However, he is taking 16 credit hours this semester, he said. After 15 more in the spring and one hour during a May semester, Prezzano will walk with his graduating class, he said.  Prezzano said he hopes the foundation’s mission of encouraging campus safety can reach other colleges. He wants his story to help other students be cognizant of their surroundings.  “We are still figuring the world out,” he said. “We don’t know what to look for.” 
  • A former Louisiana State University student was sentenced Wednesday to five years in prison for his role in the alcohol-related hazing death of a freshman from Roswell, but a judge suspended all but 2½ years of the term, according to local media reports.  Matthew Naquin was also sentenced to 1,000 hours of community service, three years of probation when released and he must pay a $1,000 fine, The Advocate reported.  Naquin, 21, of Fair Oaks Ranch, Texas, was convicted in July of negligent homicide in the September 2017 death of Max Gruver.  Gruver, 18, died after a hazing incident at the Phi Delta Theta fraternity house, according to investigators. He had an alcohol level of .495% — more than six times the legal limit for drivers — at the time of his death, the East Baton Rouge Parish Coroner’s Office previously said.  LSU President F. King Alexander temporarily suspended all Greek activities after Gruver’s death. The fraternity’s national headquarters also suspended the LSU chapter. Gruver was a 2017 graduate of Blessed Trinity High School and planned to study journalism at LSU. He loved sports and helped coach younger children, including his sister’s basketball team, according to his family.  “Max was very lovable. He cared a lot about people,” Eugene Gruver, Max’s grandfather, told The Atlanta Journal-Constitution the day after his death. “He was bright, he was intelligent. He was so talented. He knew all about sports.” Prosecutors placed the bulk of the blame for Gruver’s death on Naquin. At trial, they told the jury Naquin ripped up Gruver's bid card and made it his personal mission to keep Gruver out of the fraternity, the Advocate previously reported. During the ritual, when Gruver answered questions about the fraternity incorrectly, prosecutors said Naquin forced him to drink. In July, two other former LSU students were each sentenced to a month in jail for their roles in Gruver’s death.  Sean-Paul Gott, 22, of Lafayette, Louisiana, and Ryan Matthew Isto, 20, of Butte, Montana, pleaded no contest to misdemeanor hazing charges.
  • Planing to see the Georgia Bulldogs play at Mercedes-Benz for the SEC Championship on Dec.7?  Be aware of some rules and policies before heading to the game. Doors will open at 1:30 p.m. Kickoff is set for 3:30 p.m.  Leave your cash at home  In March, Mercedes-Benz Stadium became the first to adopt a stadium-wide cashless policy, a news release said. However, cash-to-card kiosks will be available at the Delta Sky360 Club, Mercedes-Benz Club, and by the team store. Fans can insert cash into a machine that will give back a pre-paid Visa card, with no transaction fee.  Don’t take just any bag Fans are encouraged to take clear bags to games for security reasons. Fans can take a one-gallon plastic freezer bag, or a clear bag no larger that 12 by 6 by 12 inches, according to SEC policy.  All bags will be checked at the secondary security perimeter set around the stadium and the Georgia World Congress Center.  For fans that take a bag, there will be four bag exchange locations: outside gates 1 and 2 of the stadium, and at the Georgia World Congress Center’s  Gold Deck and Hall B. Football fans will be charged $5 per bag they exchange. At Gate 1, fans can use the BinBox app to use a small locker for $5, a medium locker for $7, and a large locker for $9.  The clear bag policy exempts wallets and clutch purses that may be no bigger than 4.5 by 6.5 inches including the handle or strap.  There are exceptions to the the rule for medically necessary items.  Do your pom-poms or shakers have a paddle or a stick handle?  Mercedes-Benz stadium has a no stick handle policy for pompoms and shakers. Only those with a paddle handle will be allow inside the stadium, according to a news release. 
  • A Dahlonega man was shot and killed in his front yard Wednesday after pulling a knife on a Lumpkin County deputy, the GBI said. Shortly before 1:30 p.m., authorities received a 911 call from a woman on Black Mountain Road who reported a domestic disturbance involving her husband. Deputies arrived at the home and made contact with 55-year-old Paul Cheek, who was standing in his yard, the GBI said. Cheek then allegedly pulled out a knife, prompting the deputy to pull his weapon and fire. Cheek was struck once and died at the scene, the GBI said. No officers were injured in the incident.  In an emotional video posted to his department’s Facebook page Wednesday evening, Lumpkin County Sheriff Stacy Jarrard said he knows both the deputy and Cheek’s family. “I’m familiar with a lot of people that’s involved with this situation,” the sheriff said, adding that he’s known the deputy “all of his life.”  “My prayers go out for all individuals involved,” he said, fighting back tears. “I would ask for everybody to remember them in prayer and I will release more (information) as I can.”  Wednesday’s incident was the third officer-involved shooting reported in Georgia in less than 24 hours. The night before, a Richmond County investigator was shot and killed while conducting a routine patrol with a narcotics unit in Augusta, authorities said. Investigator Cecil Ridley was fatally injured at a gas station, Sgt. William McCarty with the Richmond County Sheriff’s Office told AJC.com. RELATED: Deputy killed, suspect injured in shooting in Augusta The 51-year-old is the third Georgia law enforcement officer killed by gunfire in 2019 and the seventh to die in the line of duty.  A suspect was also killed by police in Henry County after exchanging fire with officers outside a home in Hampton overnight, authorities said.  William Harris, 51, was fatally shot by Hampton police after telling officers he was going to kill them and opening fire, the GBI said. Police were sent to the home on North Avenue to conduct a wellness check, authorities said. MORE: Man dies after exchanging gunfire with police in Hampton, GBI says The three officer-involved shootings were the 77th, 78th and 79th that the GBI has been asked to investigate this year.  — Please return to AJC.com for updates.  In other news:
  • Georgia leaders like former Mayor Maynard Jackson, Stacey Abrams, Martin Luther King Jr. and U.S. Rep. John Lewis were all mentioned during tonight’s Democratic debate. Although it didn’t come up until late, Georgia-specific issues like the “heartbeat” anti-abortion bill and voting rights were topics of discussion. Read below for our lives updates from debate day. Here are live updates from Tyler Perry Studios and across the region: 11:22 p.m.: The debate has ended. Google Trends shows that U.S. Sen. Bernie Sanders saw a spike in searches toward the very end. Mayor Pete Buttigieg saw the largest spike around 10:38 p.m. 11:19 p.m.: The candidate who leads in the polls is given the last word: Vice President Joe Biden. “Get up,” he said. “Let’s take back this country and lead the world again, it’s within our power to do it. Get up and take it back.” 11:18 p.m.: U.S. Sen. Elizabeth Warren said many of the issues raised tonight touch American and the solutions are known, but government corruption prevents change from happening. She said government works for those at the top and not for anyone else and mentions her anti-corruption plans that include restricting lobbying and requiring more transparency for candidates. 11:17 p.m.: U.S. Sen. Bernie Sanders mentions that he is the son of an immigrant and has a sense of the immigrant experience. “I will stand with the 11 million undocumented immigrants in this country,” he said. He said he is also committed to fighting against all forms of discrimination and bigotry in this country. 11:16 p.m.: Mayor Pete Buttigieg in his closing speech name-checks former Atlanta Mayor Maynard Jackson. He said the country needs to provide a sense of belonging to those who have felt excluded. 11:14 p.m.: U.S. Sen. Kamala Harris said to beat Trump a nominee is needed to go toe-to-toe with him and she already has taken on other powerful man. She also said someone is needed with experience and ability to speak to all people regardless of race, gender, language, or geography. She reminds the audience that she has spent her entire career in public service, never working in the private sector. 11:12 p.m.: U.S. Sen. Amy Klobuchar references the open hearings under the House impeachment investigation. She said a coalition must be built not just to beat President Trump but flip the Senate. 11:11 p.m.: Entrepreneur Andrew Yang said Trump is a symptom of a larger disease and it must be addressed to make the nation better for our children. He said he never fantasized about running for president but decided to do it to make things better for the kids. 11:09 p.m.: U.S. Rep. Tulsi Gabbard mentions Martin Luther King Jr., his work for racial justice. She said Democrats need to defeat the divisiveness of Trump and work together. “Let’s make Dr. King’s dream a reality,” she said. 11:07 p.m.: Billionaire activist Tom Steyer said it’s time to get new people in charge and Democrats need to nominate someone willing to challenge Trump on the issues. “I’m the person who can do it,” he said. 11:05 p.m.: We are officially in overtime and we’ve reached closing statement. U.S. Sen. Cory Booker is first and mentions he needs help qualifying for the next debate. Then he says he is going to toss his prepared remarks and talks about seeing U.S. Rep. John Lewis in the audience and tells the story about Lewis’s civil rights work. H said American needs a leader to inspire people and, using a phrase from Lewis, said he is ready to cause “good trouble.” 11:00  p.m.: Buttigieg pivots from a question about saying he would send troops to fight the Mexican cartele to another attack on U.S. Rep. Tulsi Gabbard and whether she is more loyal to Republicans and Trump than the Democratic Party. Things got a little tense during what has otherwise been a mostly tame debate. 10:58 p.m.: Voting rights are finally the topic of discussion. Mayor Pete Buttigieg said the GOP-lead Senate should approve the voting access bill approved in the Democratic controlled House. He also said he supports making Election Day a federal holiday and making it easier for people to register to vote and to cast their ballots. “Right now we have politicians picking out their voters rather than the other way around,” Buttigieg said. U.S. Sen. Amy Klobuchar said Buttigieg is saying the right words but she has the experience in Congress working on these issues. She mentions her bill to hold social media companies accountable for political ads and also a bill requiring paper ballots. “I think experience should matter,” she said. Buttigieg hits back with what could be one of the quotes of the night. “Washington experience is not the only experience that should matter,” he said. The he mentions the collective years of political experience on the stage and asks what the country has to show for it. You could hear the crowd howling. 10:50 p.m.: Georgia’s abortion law, known as the “heartbeat” bill, is brought up. U.S. Sen. Amy Klobuchar said the right to abortion should become law in the U.S. She also said she would fight to restore funding to Planned Parenthood. Sen. Elizabeth Warren said abortion is a human right and an economic right, giving women the ability to make choices for their own body. Laws restricting abortion hit poor women and girls the hardest, she said. Sen. Bernie Sanders said men should get involved and see the abortion issue as a fight against government’s intrusion in citizens’ private lives. 10:47 p.m.: We are coming out of what should be the final commercial break. Most of the remaining time will be used by candidates to give their closing statements.  10:45 p.m.: U.S. Sen. Cory Booker said he wants to bring the conversation back to a focus on African-Americans. He talks about how drug laws have disproportionately affected black people and gets several applause lines. Former Vice President Joe Biden chimes in that he believes marijuana should be decriminalized and any conviction records expunged. Then he uses this chance to brag about his support in the black community, especially from black politicians. “A whole range of people,” Biden said. “That is not true,” Booker said. 10:42 p.m.: U.S. Sen. Elizabeth Warren said the government should use taxpayer dollars dismantle portions of President Donald Trump’s border walls if they serve no clear purpose. She then brings up the issue of family separations at the border and evokes the images of children in cages that gripped America. “When I found out that our government was actually taking away children from their families, I went down to the border; I went down there immediately,” Warren said. 10:38 p.m.: U.S. Sen. Kamala Harris discusses the Democratic Party’s reliance on support from African-American women while they continue to disproportionately face pay inequality, maternal mortality and the effects of police brutality. “The question has to be where you been and where are you going to do and do you understand what the people want?” Harris said. She said she is the candidate best positioned to address these issues in an authentic way. But Mayor Pete Buttigieg said his time leading South Bend, Ind., has given him tools he would use in hopes of connecting with black women. 10:34 p.m.: Former Vice President Joe Biden got a question about how he would respond to the “me too” movement. He said first he will push Congress to reauthorize the Violence Against Women Act, which he wrote. He spoke about the need to engage men in the discussion about domestic violence in America. But then he uses an unfortunate metaphor about “punching at” the issue. The crowd laughed nervously. 10:28 p.m.: OK we were wrong below: there is a second commercial break and we’ve reached it now. So far, no questions about Georgia’s “heartbeat bill” that has been interpreted by critics as an anti-abortion measure. There also haven’t been any questions specifically about the issues of voting rights and voter suppression that became such a huge topic during last year’s governor’s race and Stacey Abrams’ narrow loss. 10:22 p.m.: It appears that Andrew Yang has piqued the interest of debate watchers. According to Google Trends, he has had three peaks in searches for his name tonight at 9:34 p.m., 9:46 p.m. and 10:15 p.m. That third spike, we’re guessing, was after his Putin comment (see below). The green line is Mayor Pete Buttigieg, which had an early spike around 9:35 p.m. 10:18 p.m.: The Republican Party of Georgia is out with some counter-messaging about issues raised during the debate. 10:15 p.m.: Entrepreneur Andrew Yang gets this question: if elected president what is the first thing you would say to Russian President Vladimir Putin?  “I’m sorry I beat your guy,” Yang quipped, to applause. 10:04 p.m.: Businessman Tom Steyer, a self-funded candidate, gets a chance to play up his reputation on working to improve the environment. He said he is the only candidate on stage who has put environmental issues first in his campaign, including reducing the country’s reliance on fossil fuels. “I will declare a state of emergency on day one,” he said to pass reforms that address climate change. 9:55 p.m.: We have reached the first scheduled commercial break halfway through the debate. And we’ll use this time to direct you to our report of what folks are reacting to on social media. First, Joe Biden’s campaign accidentally sent his post-debate fundraising email out this afternoon.  “I’m leaving the fifth Democratic debate now,” it says. But the debate was hours away from starting at that time. Ouch. Then, once the debate began viewers began to comment that U.S. Sen. Amy Klobuchar has a slight shake or shiver as she speaks. More here on what folks on Twitter had to say about that and the debate in general. 9:53 p.m.: After focusing on family-related issues like paid parental leave and equal pay for women, the debate now pivots to affordable housing. “Our housing problem in American is a problem on supply side,” U.S. Sen. Elizabeth Warren said. She said she has a plan to build 3.2 million affordable housing units across America. U.S. Sen. Cory Booker brings up the effects of gentrification across U.S. cities. 9:40 p.m.: U.S. Sen. Cory Booker speaks about healing and bringing the nation together if he is elected president to succeed Donald Trump. “We are a nation that achieves great things when we stand together and work together and fight together,” Booker, the former Newark, N.J., mayor said. He also points out that, like Buttigieg, he is also a Rhodes Scholar mayor on the stage. A Huffington Post analysis of news reports pointed out that Buttigieg’s Rhodes credentials are mentioned considerably more often than Booker’s. 9:31 p.m.: U.S. Sen. Amy Klobuchar becomes the first candidate to name check Stacey Abrams. (Earlier, Joe Biden was the first to mention the state of Georgia.) Klobuchar said without voter suppression, Abrams would be the governor of Georgia. The audience applauded loudly. 9:30 p.m.: U.S. Sen. Kamala Harris goes on the attack against U.S. Rep. Tulsi Gabbard, saying she joined Republicans in attacking President Barack Obama during his tenure. Gabbard defended her record, saying these are false attacks that ignore her history of service to America. 9:26 p.m.: Another point of contrast among the candidates as they debate whether “Medicare for All” is the right way to expand healthcare. Both Sen. Elizabeth Warren, Sen. Bernie Sanders and Mayor Pete Buttigieg have advocated for different versions of “Medicare for All.”  Former Vice President Joe Biden says voters don’t want this type of healthcare overhaul and encourages improving President Barack Obama’s Affordable Care Act instead. 9:16 p.m.: We are seeing contrast among the candidates when it comes to how to pay for new initiatives and programs designed to help the poorest and neediest Americans.  Elizabeth Warren defends her proposed wealth tax while U.S. Sen. Cory Booker said he believes that is the wrong way to go. 9:09 p.m.: There were no opening statements, and the moderators got right to it with the U.S. House’s impeachment inquiry as the first topic. There are five senators on stage – Warren, Harris, Booker, Klobuchar, Sanders – and the question is about whether they support impeaching Trump and whether they will try to convince GOP colleagues to do the same. 8:50 p.m.: The candidates have arrived and taken their places on stage. The debate will begin in mere minutes.  Watch political columnist Jim Galloway, political reporter Greg Bluestein and Washington correspondent Tia Mitchell preview what to expect tonight. 8:15 p.m.: Watch the latest episode of LIVE In Context, which was is of course focused on the debate. Your hosts are the Joseph Ferguson and Maya T. Prabhu.  7:45 p.m.: AJC political columnist Jim Galloway writes his debate night perspective: “We are an hour and change away from the start of the first Democratic presidential primary debate in Atlanta since 1992, in a media center built to hold 500 or so representatives of the press – international, national and local.  “MSNBC is one of the sponsors. And its giant TVs spread over several acres. But none are focused on Sound Stage No. 1 at Tyler Perry Studios.  “No TV hosts are sitting in talent chairs in front of hot lights, previewing the two hours of dialogue about to happen. “Instead, every TV is tuned to the impeachment inquiry in Washington and its groundbreaking news. This debate is important, especially for Georgia Democrats. But it has clearly been overshadowed.” 7:22 p.m.:  The AJC’s Jim Galloway caught up with Democratic Party of Georgia Chairwoman Nikema Williams just now. She was showing off her debate-night shoes. Back outside, the Metro Atlanta Democratic Socialists of America turned out to support Bernie Sanders. “Bernie Sanders is the best candidate to defeat Donald Trump,” said Rishab Chawla of Atlanta, supporting a lighted Bernie sign. “He’s able to energize a multi-racial, multi-class coalition.” Adding to the carnival atmosphere outside the studio: a “Truckers for Yang” semi has been circling around, drawing cheers from candidate Andrew Yang’s supporters. 6:54 p.m.: As buses chartered people onto the debates grounds, residents stood on street corners outside the gates holding signs and cheering in support of their preferred candidates and other social causes. One Andrew Yang supporter waved fans while standing on stilts. A truck plastered with pro-Trump signs circled the area. One of the more entertaining ore-debate demonstrations came courtesy of a marching band promoting the Freedom Coalition for Charter Schools. The band parades along Hardee Avenue outside the studio.Kimberley Dukes of the Powerful Parent Network said the group does not only support charter schools, but wants excellent schools for all children.“We understand there are a lot of failing charter schools,” Dukes said. “There are a lot of failing public schools.”She said the group does not endorse candidates, but wants to ensure they get the message that educational choices are important. 6:33 p.m.: A small group of Donald Trump supporters had arrived by 6 p.m. Debbie Dooley with the Atlanta Tea Party said they are here to “show support for President Trump” amid the “impeachment witch-hunt.” She said the impeachment inquiry is making Trump’s base stronger. She doesn’t believe Georgia is on the verge of turning blue since “the candidates have moved so far left.” Robert Kunst traveled from Miami Beach to protest what he called the “Demorat Party.” He said he’s a registered Democrat, but decried the party’s effort ton impeach Trump.“I hope we have a landslide that teaches them a lesson, to stop playing games,” he said.Kunst sported a “Gays for Trump” sign and said he fought for gay rights in Florida. But he called the Democratic demonstrators around him “a collection of yahoos.” 6:15 p.m.: Stacey Abrams got candidate-level attention when she arrived Wednesday at Tyler Perry Studios. Swarmed by a few dozen reporters, the Democrat plugged her Fair Fight voting rights initiative and talked about why she plans not to endorse any presidential contenders. “I plan on being very involved in the race by pushing for conversations and policies on how we end voter suppression, how we build a democracy agenda and how we do the work to ensure the 2020 Census is a fair Census.”  Asked if she felt the moderate candidates were on the rise, Abrams said the race is “deepening.”  “We are getting more thoughtful information,” said Abrams. “As we get closer to the primaries, we’re going to start to see more robust discussion – and a deeper discussion – about not only what we want to see happen but how it happens.” “The entry of other candidates signals the excitement around this race – people know that we can win,” she added. “They know Democrats have the best values and the best ideas, and they want to be part of the conversation.”  5:56 p.m.: Outside the studio gates, several dozen demonstrators chanted “abolish ICE” to protest the actions of U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement.  “We’re here demanding that they end family separation,” said Geovani Serrano,” a community organizer with the Georgia Latino Alliance for Human Rights. “We’re here to demand they end deportation.”  Atlanta resident Lucy Sharpe turned out to support Joe Biden.“That ‘e’ is for extra Sharpe,” she said. “That’s why I support Biden.”Sharpe said the other candidates are “too socialist for me.”“I don’t think everything will be free,” she said. “I don’t think education will be free. I don’t think healthcare will be free. That’s just too socialist for me.”She said Biden “is the only one who can beat Trump.”“It’s clear that Mr. Trump is worried about Biden,” she said. “He’s gone worldwide with it. 5:12 p.m.: By 5 p.m. scores of the candidates’ supporters were already stationed outside the venue.Maggie Goldman, Georgia volunteer coordinator for Pete Buttigieg, said 150 supporters are expected.Given his recent rise in the polls, Goldman expects Buttigieg to come under fire at tonight’s debate.“I think Pete’s going to get a lot more air time,” she said. “He’s probably going to be defending himself the entire time.”  4 p.m.:  Later today, this room will be filled with about 500 journalists covering tonight’s debate. But right now, folks are just trickling in. This is also where candidates and their surrogates will circulate after the debate to make their pitch about winners and losers. That’s why it’s known as the “spin room.” 3 p.m.: Republicans aren’t planning a major event to counter Wednesday’s debate, but the GOP leaders are trying to make the most of the debate, too. Lt. Gov. Geoff Duncan sent out a fundraising plea for his new Advance Georgia group, urging supporters to “listen closely to the policy positions staked out by this new, far left, Democrat party.” And U.S. Sen. David Perdue started the day with an interview on Georgia Public Broadcasting’s “Political Rewind” accusing Democratic candidates of “trying to out-left themselves.”  “Nobody has owned up to what this would cost and how it would change the fabric of our country,” he said of the candidates’ plans.  He also talked about Gov. Brian Kemp’s search for a U.S. Senate candidate, which took a twist Wednesday when U.S. Rep. Doug Collins said he was “strongly” considering a run even if he’s not appointed.  Pressed by host Bill Nigut whether Kemp should seek a candidate who is a minority for the post, here’s what Perdue said: “The better question is who is going to best serve those constituencies. I’m a white guy, but I’ve been more involved with HBCUs and federal justice reform and all of those things that have helped that particular community moreso than anybody else I’ve seen in Georgia.” Here is some useful information about the debate, the candidates and what to expect tonight. The presidential debate is coming to Atlanta, here’s how to watch From protests to watch parties: Debate events happening in Atlanta MSNBC shows behind-the-scenes look at debate build out What to watch in Atlanta’s Democratic debate
  • The U.S. State Department has awarded $15.75 million to the University of Georgia to conduct research and find ways to reduce human trafficking around the world, the school announced Tuesday. The money will be used to increase efforts by the African Programming and Research Initiative to End Slavery, housed at the university, to continue its anti-human trafficking work. 'In addition to strengthening current anti-trafficking efforts, the goal of APRIES is to build a global community of researchers and learners in the science of estimating human trafficking prevalence,' David Okech, an associate professor of social work at UGA and director of APRIES, said in a statement. UGA said a lack of data hampers attempts to curtail human trafficking worldwide. The university will partner scholars from universities around the world to test and develop the best ways to estimate human trafficking. A conference is scheduled for early 2020.  
  • The Democratic showdown arrives in Atlanta on Wednesday with the race for president as fluid as ever. We're LIVE at Tyler Perry Studios, where the debate will be held, with what you can expect at tonight's debate, on Channel 2 Action News at 5 p.m. Impeachment proceedings have distracted attention from the contest, even as two new candidates have either launched a campaign or threatened a run. Moderate contenders are enjoying rising poll numbers after months of focus on the party's more liberal wing. And Georgia Democrats, long hungry for a chance to showcase the state before a national audience, are eager for their moment in the sun. Into this mix enter 10 top candidates, who will have a bit more room on the stage at Tyler Perry Studios but less time to make their point. The debate features two fewer contenders than last month's meetup in Ohio — and will stretch two hours instead of three. Here are a few key things to watch about Wednesday's debate: How will Georgia make its presence known?  White House hopefuls have hardly talked about voting rights during their first four Democratic debates, but that could change as the event lands in the heart of the political battle over ballot access. 'It must be asked,' U.S. Sen. Amy Klobuchar said. 'They need to hear what's happening around the country, when you've got people waiting for hours and hours at polling places, when you have laws being passed that are not meant to make it easier to vote but make it harder to vote.' The same could be said about a string of other Georgia-centric issues, such as the battle this year over the state's new abortion restrictions and an ongoing fight at the statehouse over Medicaid expansion. 'We just passed one of the most restrictive abortion bans in the country, and Georgia is like the New Hollywood of the South,' said State Sen. Nikema Williams, the chairwoman of the state Democratic Party. 'I hope that that is elevated because it has not gotten enough attention in the first four presidential debates.' Throughout the week, the candidates have tried to appeal to African American voters by rolling out platforms on ballot access and college affordability, and staging events at historically black colleges. A debate on Tyler Perry's turf seems a good opportunity to sharpen their approaches. 'Most of the candidates are courting the black vote with events before and after the debate,' said Fred Hicks, a veteran Democratic strategist. 'The question is, how will they court the black vote during the debate?' Will the debate continue a moderate moment?  The forces of moderation have claimed a string of victories in the runup to the debate. Centrist Democrats picked up major victories in off-year elections this month in Kentucky and Louisiana, despite President Donald Trump's best efforts to defeat them. Recent polls show more mainstream candidates, such as Mayor Pete Buttigieg of South Bend, Ind., and former Vice President Joe Biden, gaining ground at the expense of their more liberal rivals. Another moderate, ex-Massachusetts Gov. Deval Patrick, just joined the race, and former New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg is poised to run as a centrist. And recent polls in Georgia and other battleground states suggest most voters prefer a health care option that isn't Medicare for All. But the challenge for the moderate candidates on Wednesday's stage is to make sure the moment isn't fleeting. Staked to a clear lead in The Des Moines Register's latest Iowa Poll, Buttigieg is likely to come under fresh attacks from rivals who question his political experience or magnify his struggles with African American voters. Biden, too, faces a decision about whether to sharpen his attacks against Buttigieg, who threatens to slice off some of his support, or keep his focus on U.S. Sen. Elizabeth Warren, who is trailing close behind him in some recent national surveys. Is this a 'last stand' for some struggling candidates?  The same question has been asked about every debate, but pressure is mounting as the first round of 2020 votes approaches and standards for qualifying for debates tighten up. Klobuchar and two other U.S. Senate colleagues — Cory Booker and Kamala Harris — are locked in the single digits in most polls and face a challenge to transcend viral moments and do something more significant that fundamentally boosts their chances. A half-dozen other candidates are below them in surveys, struggling to gain any sort of traction. Some Democrats have seen enough. 'I sure hope the field is whittled down,' said Atlanta Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms, a Biden supporter. 'It's an embarrassment of riches. We have so many talented people who are willing to serve. But as we get into caucus and primary season, hopefully your numbers will begin to go down.' Hicks, the strategist, put a finer point on it: 'If they cannot make a move in this debate, there's no reason to stay in the race.' This article was written by Greg Bluestein, The Atlanta Journal-Constitution . Washington correspondent Tia Mitchell contributed to this article.

Local News

  • The University of Georgia is ranked 13th in the nation for the number of students who study abroad, according to the latest Open Doors ranking from Institute of International Education. UGA was one of only two Southeastern Conference universities and the only institution in Georgia to be ranked in the top 20. Every year, with the backing of the U.S. Department of State’s Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs, IIE conducts a survey on U.S. students studying abroad for academic credit and publishes the results in the Open Doors Report. In addition to ranking 13th overall, UGA was ninth in short-term study abroad programs. “We at the Office of Global Engagement are thankful to the UGA leadership for the support of student global experiential learning,” said Yana Cornish, director of global education. “We are proud to support a culture of study abroad among students, faculty and staff and are committed to expanding global experiential learning opportunities to all students, with particular consideration for underrepresented, rural, first-generation and other underserved students.” More than 2,600 UGA undergraduate and graduate students studied abroad in programs facilitated UGA Office of Global Engagement during the 2017-2018 academic year. “UGA’s position in the national rankings reflects the growing demand among students for a study abroad experience, the increased availability of scholarship funding provided by the university and individual donors, and the tireless dedication of our faculty, who are committed to offering academically rigorous programs,” said Noel Fallows, associate provost for the Office of Global Engagement. “Although many of our programs take place during the summer months, they are a year-round commitment for faculty, who work behind the scenes developing cost-effective budgets and preparing culturally immersive courses to create optimal, memorable and transformative international experiences.” Jack Hu, the university’s senior vice president for academic affairs and provost, added that UGA’s Open Doors ranking underscores the institution’s stature as a national leader in experiential learning. “The University of Georgia is one of the nation’s largest public universities to ensure that all of our undergraduate students benefit from learning opportunities such as study abroad, internships, service-learning and research,” Hu said. “These experiences position students for career success and lay the foundation for a lifetime of engaged citizenship.” Additional information on all UGA Education Abroad programs are available on the StudyAway portal: https://studyaway.uga.edu/
  • ATHENS Georgia basketball has made it a historical start to the season with Wednesday night's 82-78 win over rival Georgia Tech. It was the Bulldogs' fifth-straight win in the series, the first time that has happened in 79 years, and the 10,205 fans at Stegeman Coliseum couldn't have been more happy. 'This is a huge rivalry,' Georgia coach Tom Crean said. 'I said to the team, there are gong to be things in life that are so much bigger than you, and a game like this is one of them. 'When those seniors can say they never lost those games, that's a big deal.' Junior Rayshaun Hammonds carried the load for the Bulldogs (4-0), matching his season high with 26 points while pulling down 9 rebounds against the Yellow Jackets (2-1). Projected NBA lottery pick Anthony Edwards had 18 points and 8 rebounds, and senior grad-transfer Donnell Gresham Jr. had 13 points and 6 rebounds. Edwards, of course, made history by scoring 53 points in his first two games, eclipsing the freshman record previously held by Georgia and NBA Great Dominique Wilkins (1979). Michael Devoe had 34 points including a last-second, half-court shot to lead Georgia Tech. The Yellow Jackets opened the Nov. 5 with an 82-81 overtime road win over North Carolina State. Hammonds dominated the first half, scoring 19 of his points through the first 20 minutes. It carried into the second half with Georgia leading by as many as 16 points. 'It's a big win for us,' Hammonds said. 'I haven't lost to them, I don't want to lose to them.' A degree of uncertainty crept into the building with 10:15 remaining, however, when Hammonds picked up his fourth foul while scrambling for a loose ball. Hammonds took his 26 points and 8 rebounds to the bench, and Crean and the Bulldogs turned to freshman Anthony 'Antman' Edwards. Edwards, 1-of-8 shooting to that point with 5 points, drained a 3-pointer on the next trip down to make it 59-48 a the 9:41 mark. It triggered a 10-2 run that Edwards capped with a drive to the basket that made it 66-50. 'We did a good job on Edwards, he made some big plays late,' Georgia Tech coach Josh Pastner said. 'He's a pro, he's going to be one of the top 3 draft picks, pros do that.' The Bulldogs had used a 13-2 run to end the first half and take control of what had been a back-and-forth first half, leading 35-27 intermission. Edwards had just 2 points at the half, and he didn't score his first field goal until hitting a long jumper that made it 42-31 with 17:50 left. The Bulldogs fans came to life, and it was another big crowd. Georgia, in fact, has the second-largest season attendance in school history through four games (35,152), approaching the record set in 1981 when Stegeman Coliseum held 11,200 and drew 38,741 through its first four games. More history will be made when Georgia returns to action at 2:30 p.m. next Monday in the Maui Invitational against Dayton (TV: ESPN2). The Bulldogs, making their first-ever appearance in the prestigious will play again on Tuesday (Michigan State or Virginia Tech) and Wednesday (TBD). DawgNation Georgia basketball coverage Georgia overwhelms Delaware State, Rayshaun Hammonds stars UGA drops The Citadel, Anthony Edwards scores 29 Anthony Edwards having fun, but Tom Crean expects more Tom Crean wants more control against The Citadel RELATED: Anthony Edwards draws standing ovation in opener Georgia basketball strikes exhibition gold vs. Charlotte 49ers Sahvir Wheeler hidden star, directs point after first exhibition Anthony Edwards lives up to hype in exhibition opener Georgia freshman already making basketball history The post Georgia basketball off to historic start, dumps Georgia Tech 82-78 appeared first on DawgNation.
  • ATHENS — A faint, round, red spot just above his shirt collar is the only obvious physical evidence that something happened to Tate Prezzano nearly seven months ago. However, inside the University of Georgia student’s body a bullet fragment remains lodged just one millimeter from his spinal cord after he was shot multiple times near campus.  “One millimeter. One ‘mm.’ It is the smallest measurement you can get in the metric system,” his father, Dobbin Prezzano, said. To Prezzano and his father, the abbreviation “1 mm” has taken on a new meaning: “One man’s mission,” the tagline for the new foundation and scholarship program Tate Prezzano created in the wake of the shooting.  Prezzano introduced the foundation Wednesday morning at a news conference at Piedmont Athens Regional Medical Center, the hospital where he underwent his medical treatment after the shooting. It was the 22-year-old’s first public appearance since the April 22 incident. Prezzano said the focus of his foundation, named the TateTough Foundation after the social media hashtag that began trending during his recovery, is to effect safety and security on college campuses.  RELATED: UGA victim ID’d as lacrosse player; police release sketch of alleged shooter Prezzano is part of UGA’s club lacrosse team and played lacrosse and football at Cambridge High School in Milton.  As the junior communications major was waiting at an Athens bus stop, a man approached him, robbed him and shot him multiple times in the upper part of his body. “Few incidents are more concerning than a young man standing at the bus stop, waiting to go to college, that is accosted by an armed assailant, robbed and shot,” Athens-Clarke County police Chief Cleveland Spruill said in a news conference after the shooting.  It happened about 7:15 a.m. the Monday after Easter, Prezzano said. His bus was scheduled to arrive at 7:18 a.m.  He said he saw something move out of the corner of his eye, and when he looked up a man was pointing a gun at him.  Prezzano was hit in the shoulder, in the neck and in the back of the head. He laid bleeding on the sidewalk, watching cars go by and hoping one would stop.  “I actually saw my bus go by,” he said.  One man pulled over. Phil Haymore, who manages the intensive care unit at Piedmont Athens, was on his way to work when he saw Prezzano on the ground.  “I have a son at UGA. He’s right around Tate’s age,” Haymore said. “As far as I’m concerned, my son was laying on the sidewalk.”  Haymore provided care for Prezzano until emergency medical services arrived and took him to the hospital. He remained there for six days.   A second UGA student was also robbed at gunpoint near the bus stop, which is just south of campus and the Athens Perimeter. That student was not hurt in the incident, which occurred moments before Prezzano was shot. He was able to give police a description of the suspect, which was used to create a sketch. It depicted a man with medium-length braids or dreads. Not long after the sketch was released, GBI special agent Mike Ayers said tips started pouring in from community members. MORE: Gwinnett man arrested in shooting of UGA lacrosse player from metro Atlanta Zarren Garner, 20, of Grayson, was arrested in Gwinnett County the next morning. Spruill said they were able to identify Garner through a number of citizen tips and because of the man’s prior “low-level criminal background.”  Thus began Tate Prezzano’s recovery process. He said he spent about five days a week in physical therapy over the summer. He wasn’t able to take summer classes for his major.  “His typical regimen over the summer of academics and athletics ... was going to be replaced by physical therapy, occupational therapy, aquatic therapy,” his father said.  The foundation is part of Prezzano’s recovery process. The first pillar of its three-part mission is to support Prezzano throughout his doctor visits, therapy sessions and various treatments.  The second part, Prezzano said, is to encourage other athletes.  “Our goal is to promote funding for scholarships at two schools that have been an integral part of and made an impression on Tate: The University of Georgia and Cambridge High School,” the TateTough website said. “The Foundation will award a $1,000 scholarship to one University of Georgia lacrosse player and one Cambridge High School athlete each year that the Foundation can support the effort.”  “This scholarship is going to go to the person (we) feel exemplifies what the ultimate teammate would be,” Prezzano said. “The ultimate teammate, in my opinion, is not necessarily the ‘rah-rah’ guy. It’s not necessarily the all-star or the best player. He’s the kind of person that would come off the field if he needs to, he would go on the field and play a different position, or just kind of do whatever is asked and be reliable.”  But invaluable to the TateTough Foundation is the need to augment campus safety, Prezzano said. The foundation is working with UGA to explore options to make the campus safer, such as improved kiosks and phone apps that would allow for a more immediate response in the case of an emergency. Campus safety is at the top of his mind now that Prezzano has resumed taking classes at UGA.   He is still undergoing physical therapy three times a week. However, he is taking 16 credit hours this semester, he said. After 15 more in the spring and one hour during a May semester, Prezzano will walk with his graduating class, he said.  Prezzano said he hopes the foundation’s mission of encouraging campus safety can reach other colleges. He wants his story to help other students be cognizant of their surroundings.  “We are still figuring the world out,” he said. “We don’t know what to look for.” 
  • A former Louisiana State University student was sentenced Wednesday to five years in prison for his role in the alcohol-related hazing death of a freshman from Roswell, but a judge suspended all but 2½ years of the term, according to local media reports.  Matthew Naquin was also sentenced to 1,000 hours of community service, three years of probation when released and he must pay a $1,000 fine, The Advocate reported.  Naquin, 21, of Fair Oaks Ranch, Texas, was convicted in July of negligent homicide in the September 2017 death of Max Gruver.  Gruver, 18, died after a hazing incident at the Phi Delta Theta fraternity house, according to investigators. He had an alcohol level of .495% — more than six times the legal limit for drivers — at the time of his death, the East Baton Rouge Parish Coroner’s Office previously said.  LSU President F. King Alexander temporarily suspended all Greek activities after Gruver’s death. The fraternity’s national headquarters also suspended the LSU chapter. Gruver was a 2017 graduate of Blessed Trinity High School and planned to study journalism at LSU. He loved sports and helped coach younger children, including his sister’s basketball team, according to his family.  “Max was very lovable. He cared a lot about people,” Eugene Gruver, Max’s grandfather, told The Atlanta Journal-Constitution the day after his death. “He was bright, he was intelligent. He was so talented. He knew all about sports.” Prosecutors placed the bulk of the blame for Gruver’s death on Naquin. At trial, they told the jury Naquin ripped up Gruver's bid card and made it his personal mission to keep Gruver out of the fraternity, the Advocate previously reported. During the ritual, when Gruver answered questions about the fraternity incorrectly, prosecutors said Naquin forced him to drink. In July, two other former LSU students were each sentenced to a month in jail for their roles in Gruver’s death.  Sean-Paul Gott, 22, of Lafayette, Louisiana, and Ryan Matthew Isto, 20, of Butte, Montana, pleaded no contest to misdemeanor hazing charges.
  • Planing to see the Georgia Bulldogs play at Mercedes-Benz for the SEC Championship on Dec.7?  Be aware of some rules and policies before heading to the game. Doors will open at 1:30 p.m. Kickoff is set for 3:30 p.m.  Leave your cash at home  In March, Mercedes-Benz Stadium became the first to adopt a stadium-wide cashless policy, a news release said. However, cash-to-card kiosks will be available at the Delta Sky360 Club, Mercedes-Benz Club, and by the team store. Fans can insert cash into a machine that will give back a pre-paid Visa card, with no transaction fee.  Don’t take just any bag Fans are encouraged to take clear bags to games for security reasons. Fans can take a one-gallon plastic freezer bag, or a clear bag no larger that 12 by 6 by 12 inches, according to SEC policy.  All bags will be checked at the secondary security perimeter set around the stadium and the Georgia World Congress Center.  For fans that take a bag, there will be four bag exchange locations: outside gates 1 and 2 of the stadium, and at the Georgia World Congress Center’s  Gold Deck and Hall B. Football fans will be charged $5 per bag they exchange. At Gate 1, fans can use the BinBox app to use a small locker for $5, a medium locker for $7, and a large locker for $9.  The clear bag policy exempts wallets and clutch purses that may be no bigger than 4.5 by 6.5 inches including the handle or strap.  There are exceptions to the the rule for medically necessary items.  Do your pom-poms or shakers have a paddle or a stick handle?  Mercedes-Benz stadium has a no stick handle policy for pompoms and shakers. Only those with a paddle handle will be allow inside the stadium, according to a news release. 

Bulldog News

  • ATHENS Kirby Smart opened the football portion of his Monday press conference talking about injuries, updating media on his banged-up offensive line and hobbled go-to receiver. It was a pre-emptive strike. The Georgia football head coach doesn't want to be asked abut the specifics, or go down the laundry list of players limited, or out or dealing with injuries. The media viewing portions of practices have been closed the past two weeks, the Bulldogs understandably not wanting opponents to know who is healthy enough to go through drills, and who has been sitting out. Georgia's football season is on the line once again this Saturday and Smart is no different than any other coach in the sense that he doesn't want to give away any more information than necessary. The No. 4-ranked Bulldogs (9-1, 6-1 SEC) play host to No. 24 Texas A&M (7-3, 4-2) at 3:30 p.m. on Saturday at Sanford Stadium (TV: CBS). It's a Georgia team that survived Auburn, 21-14, despite being out-gained 158 yards to 2 yards in the fourth quarter. The Bulldogs were missing three offensive by the end of the contest. Smart revealed after last Saturday's game that Ben Cleveland missed two practices following his SEC Offensive Lineman of the Week performance against Missouri. On Monday, Smart acknowledged that Georgia's Swiss Army Knife Offensive Lineman Cade Mays would miss time on the practice field. On Tuesday, Smart offered some hope, albeit, limited. Cade has been out there working, and Ben has practiced,' Smart said on Tuesday. 'Cade didn't do much yesterday, he did a lot more today as far as reps, we're hopeful he'll be able to go.' For receiver Lawrence Cager, who has been playing with a separated shoulder, Smart said it's a matter of how much he could 'sustain.' Even the staff photographer, Lauren Chamberlain, has been held out of action this week after her sideline collision with Brian Herrien. But Georgia has a fair share of players who have been playing despite injuries, receivers Tyler Simmons (shoulder) and Demetris Robertson (hamstring) both appearing somewhat limited, as well as defensive lineman David Marshall (foot) and offensive linemen Isaiah Wilson (ankle) and Trey Hill (ankle). Others simply don't put the pads on and thus don't get asked about anymore: Defensive back Tyrique McGhee (foot), receiver Tommy Bush (groin), quarterback D'Wan Mathis (head), lineman Justin Shaffer. Georgia football injury report WR Lawrence Cager (shoulder) probable WR Tyler Simmons (shoulder) probable C Trey Hill (ankle) probable OG Ben Cleveland (foot) probable DL David Marshall (foot) probable OL Cade Mays (ankle) questionable DB Tyrique McGhee (foot) doubtful QB D'Wan Mathis (head) out WR Tommy Bush (groin) out OL Justin Shaffer (neck) out Georgia football DawgNation Kirby Smart reveals redshirt plan for Georgia senior defensive lineman WATCH: Gus Malzahn says Auburn 'stuffed' Georgia in 4th quarter Georgia football stars make short list for Outland Trophy, Nagurski Award WATCH: Georgia QB Jake Fromm says offense must get better Georgia in select company, clinches third-straight SEC East Division title Jimbo Fisher says Jake Fromm as good as anyone in the country The post Georgia football injury report: Offense hobbled entering Texas A&M battle appeared first on DawgNation.
  • There's a different way to look at the bottom line for Georgia-Texas A&M this week. Especially in terms of what Jimbo Fisher and Kirby Smart bring to the table. Try a bottom line that charts $14,371,600. That is the reported combined 2019 salaries for the head coaches for that big SEC clash on Saturday. Read that line again. Digest that $14.3 million part. That's the number according to the latest 2019 salary figures in the annual USA Today report on coaching salaries for NCAA football . Fisher, who signed a 10-year deal worth $75 million in December of 2017, ranks as the fourth-highest paid head coach in college football. It makes one wonder why the nachos will not be $14.30 inside Sanford Stadium on Saturday. Fisher still has a robust buyout of $60 million. ( That means Jimmy Sexton's great-great-grandchildren are also getting Gucci every Christmas. Sexton represents five of the nation's 10-highest paid coaches and almost all of the SEC.) Smart comes in at No. 5 on that listing. His buyout is a mere $24.2 million for the remaining years on his deal. Several coaches, such as Auburn's Gus Malzhan (No.6) are slated to receive yearly pay hikes that will also take them into the $7 million per year range in 2020, too. The USA Today study places a somewhat unexpected name at the top. It was not Nick Saban, but still the head coach of the defending national champions nonetheless. Clemson's Dabo Swinney rates No. 1 on that database with a total compensation figure of $9,315,600 for 2019. Saban follows at No. 2 ($8.9 million) and Jim Harbaugh ($7.504 million) round out the top 3. The SEC also flexes the power of its TV deals and respective fan bases by placing the head coaches from five of its member schools among the top 10 in that survey. Mississippi State pays Joe Moorhead $3,050,000 on that listing. It will rank him last in the SEC, but that windfall places him at No. 48 out of the 122 coaching salaries tracked in that database. The post Jimbo Fisher and Kirby Smart both rank among the NCAA's highest-paid coaches appeared first on DawgNation.
  • ATHENS Rayshaun Hammonds says he just wants to win, and now that the 6-foot-8, 240-pounder has figured out what it will take from him, Georgia basketball could prove dangerous. Hammonds matched his season high in scoring with 26 points, also leading the young Bulldogs with 9 rebounds in their 82-78 win over an experienced and battled-tested Georgia Tech on Wednesday night. It was Georgia's fifth-straight win in the rivalry, the first time that has happened in 79 years. RELATED: Anthony Edwards helps spark historical start to season 'Rayshaun has had a breakthrough,' second-year Georgia coach Tom Crean said Wednesday night. 'You never known when breakthroughs are going to come, (and) you never know how breakthroughs are going to come, and you can't plan them. 'They have to be natural and he's doing a good job. Ray is letting things come to him.' Anthony Edwards, one of 10 new players on the team and a 6-5 combo guard projected to be a lottery pick in the 2020 NBA Draft, explained why the ball went inside to Hammonds throughout the first half. 'They were pressing me and Tyree (Crump) hard when we were getting the ball,' Edwards said. 'So if they are pressing us, we've got the best four man in the country, he's going to eat.' Indeed, Hammonds scored 19 of his points in the first half, helping Georgia take a 35-27 lead to intermission. 'I thought [Rayshaun] Hammonds was a stud tonight,' Georgia Tech coach Josh Pastner said. 'Obviously, we recruited him hard, too. He's a really good basketball player and he really had a great game and is a big difference maker for them, especially in that first half. 'That was the difference tonight, what Hammonds did in the first half, that set the tone.' Crean has been challenging Hammonds to be a difference-maker and set the tone in practice, too, harping on him publicly and privately to become more consistent. Edwards can score all the points and make all the highlights, but if Hammonds doesn't provide a physical presence in the paint, Georgia will likely miss the NCAA Tournament for what would be the seventh time in the past eight years. The Bulldogs' hopes took a major hit last summer when All-SEC sophomore Nicolas Claxton left for the NBA, adding to attrition that included six seniors and three underclassmen transfers. Georgia lost more than 56 percent of its scoring off last year's team and 63 percent of its rebounding. But Edwards has come in with a signing class that ranked fifth in the nation, and the 10 new players have brought enough firepower and positive energy to help get Hammonds going. 'The incoming freshmen took a lot of stress off me, because they can play,' said Hammonds, who was ranked the 51st-best player in the 2017 class coming out of Norcross. 'We have dogs, nobody is scared to get on the floor. The main focus is to play physical, you don't want to get punked by other teams.' Hammonds has proven he can supply the muscle as well as provide an outside touch, connecting on 2 of 4 attempts beyond the 3-point arc against Georgia Tech. 'Rayshaun did a great job leading us,' Edwards said, 'and we followed.' Georgia basketball's Anthony Edwards and Rayshaun Hammonds Georgia basketball coach Tom Crean DawgNation Georgia basketball c Georgia overwhelms Delaware State, Rayshaun Hammonds stars UGA drops The Citadel, Anthony Edwards scores 29 Anthony Edwards having fun, but Tom Crean expects more Tom Crean wants more control against The Citadel RELATED: Anthony Edwards draws standing ovation in opener Georgia basketball strikes exhibition gold vs. Charlotte 49ers Sahvir Wheeler hidden star, directs point after first exhibition Anthony Edwards lives up to hype in exhibition opener Georgia freshman already making basketball history The post Georgia basketball forward Rayshaun Hammonds breakthrough' wrecked Georgia Tech appeared first on DawgNation.
  • ATHENS Georgia basketball has made it a historical start to the season with Wednesday night's 82-78 win over rival Georgia Tech. It was the Bulldogs' fifth-straight win in the series, the first time that has happened in 79 years, and the 10,205 fans at Stegeman Coliseum couldn't have been more happy. 'This is a huge rivalry,' Georgia coach Tom Crean said. 'I said to the team, there are gong to be things in life that are so much bigger than you, and a game like this is one of them. 'When those seniors can say they never lost those games, that's a big deal.' Junior Rayshaun Hammonds carried the load for the Bulldogs (4-0), matching his season high with 26 points while pulling down 9 rebounds against the Yellow Jackets (2-1). Projected NBA lottery pick Anthony Edwards had 18 points and 8 rebounds, and senior grad-transfer Donnell Gresham Jr. had 13 points and 6 rebounds. Edwards, of course, made history by scoring 53 points in his first two games, eclipsing the freshman record previously held by Georgia and NBA Great Dominique Wilkins (1979). Michael Devoe had 34 points including a last-second, half-court shot to lead Georgia Tech. The Yellow Jackets opened the Nov. 5 with an 82-81 overtime road win over North Carolina State. Hammonds dominated the first half, scoring 19 of his points through the first 20 minutes. It carried into the second half with Georgia leading by as many as 16 points. 'It's a big win for us,' Hammonds said. 'I haven't lost to them, I don't want to lose to them.' A degree of uncertainty crept into the building with 10:15 remaining, however, when Hammonds picked up his fourth foul while scrambling for a loose ball. Hammonds took his 26 points and 8 rebounds to the bench, and Crean and the Bulldogs turned to freshman Anthony 'Antman' Edwards. Edwards, 1-of-8 shooting to that point with 5 points, drained a 3-pointer on the next trip down to make it 59-48 a the 9:41 mark. It triggered a 10-2 run that Edwards capped with a drive to the basket that made it 66-50. 'We did a good job on Edwards, he made some big plays late,' Georgia Tech coach Josh Pastner said. 'He's a pro, he's going to be one of the top 3 draft picks, pros do that.' The Bulldogs had used a 13-2 run to end the first half and take control of what had been a back-and-forth first half, leading 35-27 intermission. Edwards had just 2 points at the half, and he didn't score his first field goal until hitting a long jumper that made it 42-31 with 17:50 left. The Bulldogs fans came to life, and it was another big crowd. Georgia, in fact, has the second-largest season attendance in school history through four games (35,152), approaching the record set in 1981 when Stegeman Coliseum held 11,200 and drew 38,741 through its first four games. More history will be made when Georgia returns to action at 2:30 p.m. next Monday in the Maui Invitational against Dayton (TV: ESPN2). The Bulldogs, making their first-ever appearance in the prestigious will play again on Tuesday (Michigan State or Virginia Tech) and Wednesday (TBD). DawgNation Georgia basketball coverage Georgia overwhelms Delaware State, Rayshaun Hammonds stars UGA drops The Citadel, Anthony Edwards scores 29 Anthony Edwards having fun, but Tom Crean expects more Tom Crean wants more control against The Citadel RELATED: Anthony Edwards draws standing ovation in opener Georgia basketball strikes exhibition gold vs. Charlotte 49ers Sahvir Wheeler hidden star, directs point after first exhibition Anthony Edwards lives up to hype in exhibition opener Georgia freshman already making basketball history The post Georgia basketball off to historic start, dumps Georgia Tech 82-78 appeared first on DawgNation.
  • ATHENS Georgia stars have made the short list for two of the most prestigious awards in college football, the Outland Trophy and the Nagurski Award. Junior left tackle Andrew Thomas was named one of six semifinalists for the Outland Trophy, which recognizes the top interior lineman on offense or defense. Outland Trophy semifinalists OT Andrew Thomas, Georgia OC Tyler Biadasz, Wisconsin DT Derrick Brown, Auburn OT Penei Sewell, Oregon OG John Simpson, Clemson OT Tristan Wirfs, Iowa. Reed, a senior safety, is one of five finalists for the Nagurksi Award, which recognizes the best defensive player in college football. SS J.R. Reed, Georgia DT Derrick Brown, Auburn LB Isaiah Simmons, Clemson DB Antoine Winfield Jr., Minnesota DE Chase Young, Ohio State Georgia DawgNation stories Kirby Smart reveals redshirt plan for Georgia senior defensive lineman WATCH: Gus Malzahn says Auburn 'stuffed' Georgia in 4th quarter WATCH: Georgia QB Jake Fromm says offense must get better Georgia in select company, clinches third-straight SEC East Division title UGA stock report: Bulldogs cash in at Auburn with 21-14 win Georgia game ball, punter Jake Camarda kept Tigers backed up Brian Herrien, Jake Fromm pray for injured UGA photographer The post Georgia stars Andrew Thomas, J.R. Reed semifinalists for Outland Trophy, Nagurski Award appeared first on DawgNation.