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National
Samuel Little: FBI releases chilling confessions, sketches of 5 unknown victims of serial killer
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Samuel Little: FBI releases chilling confessions, sketches of 5 unknown victims of serial killer

FBI - This man is now the deadliest serial killer in US history

Samuel Little: FBI releases chilling confessions, sketches of 5 unknown victims of serial killer

FBI agents are calling Samuel Little the most prolific serial killer in American history, but many of Little’s victims remain unidentified, their faces known only through crude colored sketches drawn for authorities by their killer.

Little, 79, has confessed to murdering 93 women between 1970 and 2005. Little, a high school dropout who has lived a mostly nomadic life, is currently serving life sentences in the California State Prison for three of those killings.

AP Photo/Damian Dovarganes
Samuel Little appears in court in Los Angeles in a March 2013 photo. Little, 79, has confessed to 93 murders and FBI agents, who have confirmed 50 of the killings, have named him the most prolific serial killer in U.S. history.
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Samuel Little Victims 01

Photo Credit: AP Photo/Damian Dovarganes
Samuel Little appears in court in Los Angeles in a March 2013 photo. Little, 79, has confessed to 93 murders and FBI agents, who have confirmed 50 of the killings, have named him the most prolific serial killer in U.S. history.

He is diabetic, has heart disease and relies on a wheelchair to get around, The New York Times reported. Besides the three murders he is serving time for in California, Little also pleaded guilty last year to one murder in Texas and, in August, pleaded guilty to four more in Ohio. 

The FBI on Sunday announced that agents have thus far been able to link Little to 50 of the slayings he has confessed to and said the bureau’s crime analysts believe all 93 of his confessions are credible. The findings mean that Little is believed to be responsible for more killings than Gary Ridgeway, who, labeled the “Green River Killer,” was convicted in 2003 of 49 murders in Washington State in the 1980s and 1990s.

Authorities in Knox County, Tennessee, said Monday that a woman named Martha Cunningham, who was found dead in a wooded area in 1975, is likely a victim of Little, The Associated Press reported. Investigators in countless other jurisdictions are also combing their files to determine if any of their cold cases fit Little’s confessions. 

Federal investigators are meanwhile seeking the public’s help in identifying five women Little said he killed, but who have remained unaccounted for.

One of those cases is more than 45 years old.

Federal Bureau of Investigation via AP
Pictured are some of the sketches made by Samuel Little of women he confessed to killing over a span of nearly 40 years. Little, 79, has been named the most prolific serial killer in U.S. history, responsible for at least 50 killings of women.
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Samuel Little Victims 15

Photo Credit: Federal Bureau of Investigation via AP
Pictured are some of the sketches made by Samuel Little of women he confessed to killing over a span of nearly 40 years. Little, 79, has been named the most prolific serial killer in U.S. history, responsible for at least 50 killings of women.

>> Related story: This Georgia-born serial killer is now the deadliest in US history, FBI says

Federal authorities said Little targeted women who lived on the outskirts of society, some of them prostitutes and drug users.

“Little’s method of killing also didn’t always leave obvious signs that the death was a homicide,” an FBI statement said. “The one-time competitive boxer usually stunned or knocked out his victims with powerful punches and then strangled them.”

Investigators said the beatings prior to the women’s deaths were so brutal that one victim’s autopsy showed she was struck in the abdomen with such force that it broke her spine, according to The New York Times.

The bodies were often found long after the signs of strangulation would have been gone, sometimes when the remains were nothing but bones.

“With no stab marks or bullet wounds, many of these deaths were not classified as homicides, but attributed to drug overdoses, accidents or natural causes,” authorities said.

AP Photo/Jae C. Hong
LAPD Detective Rick Jackson examines a map in March 2013 that is dotted with locations where Samuel Little had interactions with law enforcement over the years. Little, 79, has been named by the FBI as the most prolific serial killer in U.S. history.
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Samuel Little Victims 07

Photo Credit: AP Photo/Jae C. Hong
LAPD Detective Rick Jackson examines a map in March 2013 that is dotted with locations where Samuel Little had interactions with law enforcement over the years. Little, 79, has been named by the FBI as the most prolific serial killer in U.S. history.

>> Read more trending news 

As part of their efforts, FBI officials have taken the unusual step of posting online Little’s confessions in those homicides, along with the sketches Little drew of the women based on his own recollections.

The information comes with a couple of caveats: Little’s details may be off a little -- and the killer’s confessions are chilling.

“Samuel Little’s recollection of dates is not always accurate,” FBI agents said in a statement. “He also sometimes struggles to remember the exact clothing worn by a victim. Any potential links should not be dismissed based on these two factors alone.

“The videos of Little contain references to violent acts. Viewer discretion is encouraged.”

Federal Bureau of Investigation
Pictured is a sketch Samuel Little drew of a woman he says he killed in 1972 in Miami. Little, 79, has been named by the FBI as the most prolific serial killer in U.S. history, responsible for at least 50 killings of women over nearly 40 years.
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Samuel Little Victims 08

Photo Credit: Federal Bureau of Investigation
Pictured is a sketch Samuel Little drew of a woman he says he killed in 1972 in Miami. Little, 79, has been named by the FBI as the most prolific serial killer in U.S. history, responsible for at least 50 killings of women over nearly 40 years.

Little told authorities he first met Marianne, an 18- or 19-year-old transgender woman, at a bar known as the Pool or the Pool Palace in Miami around 1972. They encountered one another a few days later at another bar in Overtown, where Little said he offered to give Marianne a ride home.

Marianne, who Little said had a boyfriend named Wes, lived with roommates somewhere between Brownsville and Liberty City, according to his confession.

“When they arrived there, one of Marianne’s roommates asked them to buy a can of shaving cream, so they returned to Little’s car, a gold four-door Pontiac LeMans,” the FBI page on the case states.

In his confession, Little told agents he was driving his “stepdaddy’s” car at that time.

“Little drove Marianne north on Highway 27 and killed her on a driveway, possibly near a sugarcane field,” FBI officials said.

In his confession, Little stated that he was headed toward Fort Lauderdale when he noticed a road off of the main road, about a mile or two out of Miami.

“So, I got her out of the car,” Little told Texas Ranger James Holland, who is credited with eliciting the majority of Little’s confessions. “Pulled her out and drug her into the growth back there. And pulled her deeper into ... there’s a path, a little path that went in somewhere. I don’t know where it led to, but it running deeper into the undergrowth.

“It’s like Everglades like that, and we ran into some water running. And but before we got to the water, the earth was mushy. I turn her loose and she fell into it face down.”

Little told agents he doesn’t believe Marianne, who he dumped about 200 yards into the “thick, muddy water,” was ever found, agents said.

The killer described Marianne as good-looking, about 140 pounds and about 5 feet, 6 inches or 5 feet, 7 inches tall.

Federal Bureau of Investigation
Pictured is a sketch Samuel Little drew of a woman he says he killed in 1982 in New Orleans. Little, 79, has been named by the FBI as the most prolific serial killer in U.S. history, responsible for at least 50 killings of women over nearly 40 years.
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Samuel Little Victims 12

Photo Credit: Federal Bureau of Investigation
Pictured is a sketch Samuel Little drew of a woman he says he killed in 1982 in New Orleans. Little, 79, has been named by the FBI as the most prolific serial killer in U.S. history, responsible for at least 50 killings of women over nearly 40 years.

Little told investigators he met a black woman with “honey-colored” skin in New Orleans in 1982, possibly in the fall of that year. By that time, he was traveling in a Lincoln Continental Mark III.

He met the woman, who he said was wearing a pretty dress with buttons on the front, at a club where she was attending a birthday party with friends and one of her two sisters.

“Her youngest sister was having a birthday party,” Little said, according to transcripts. “Her sister was dancing with this guy on the floor. And when I come in, the girl that I was with offered to dance with me.

“While we’re dancing, she says, ‘You want to go riding after this, you know, after this party’s over?’ We walked outside, and she looked and seen my car, that Lincoln. She said, ‘Woo, that’s a beautiful car, too.’ So she had me, arm in arm, walking to the car. We got in. We stopped at a gas station.”

Little said he and the woman, who told him she lived with her invalid mother, were driving along Interstate 10 toward Slidell when he saw a sign for the Little Woods exit.

“So I cut off, I took off the exit,” Little said. “And we went and that, sure enough, was a road leading me into the woods. And we went in and park. So we finally got to where we were going, and it was by a bayou, a river, a little water thing. The big, they had a machine out there in that little river.”

“Dredging?” Holland asked.

“Dredging. I grabbed her by the legs and pulled her to the water,” Little said. “That’s the only one that I ever killed by drowning.

“I left her with her head still there in the water. Half her body underwater, and the thighs and legs on the bank.”

After killing the woman, Little drove back to the motel where he was staying in Pascagoula, Mississippi, according to FBI agents.

Little described this victim as between 30 and 40 years old, weighing about 150 pounds and about 5 feet, 8 inches tall.

“She had a beautiful body on her, a beautiful 150 (pounds),” Little said in his confession. “Well put together.”

Federal Bureau of Investigation
Pictured is a sketch Samuel Little drew of a woman he says he killed in 1984 in Kentucky. Little, 79, has been named by the FBI as the most prolific serial killer in U.S. history, responsible for at least 50 killings of women over nearly 40 years.
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Samuel Little Victims 11

Photo Credit: Federal Bureau of Investigation
Pictured is a sketch Samuel Little drew of a woman he says he killed in 1984 in Kentucky. Little, 79, has been named by the FBI as the most prolific serial killer in U.S. history, responsible for at least 50 killings of women over nearly 40 years.

Little told investigators he was driving his Lincoln from his hometown of Lorain, Ohio, to Cincinnati in the summer of 1984 when he met a white 25-year-old woman outside a strip club in Columbus, Kentucky. The woman asked him for a ride to Miami, where she said her mother lived.

He described her as having the aura of a hippie.

“You mentioned before that, that uh, you said she kind of had like this hippie aura to her?” Holland asked, according to transcripts.

“Yeah, she did give you a hippie feeling. I think she was some kind of hippie, yeah,” Little said.

The woman, who had short, “dishwater blonde” hair, got into Little’s car, and they drove south on Interstate 75, FBI agents said. They reached Cincinnati and spent some time on Vine Street before crossing the state line into Kentucky, where they went to Covington.

“We got to Covington, and then we continued through Covington. And there was a park that they were having a festival in,” Little said. “And she heard the music and (expletive) off the band in there. And by her being a hippie type, she ‘whoa,’ she want to get to that. But the police came over and peeked in the car. He really wanted me to move out of there.”

Little said they drove to an area not far from I-75, where he found a short road going up a hill.

“And up top, there was, uh, vegetation. There wasn’t no houses or nothing,” Little said. “So I pulled up in there and concealed the car in that little vegetation up there on top of the hill.”

Little strangled the woman in the back seat of his car, FBI officials said. He left her body on the hill, partially concealed by the vegetation.

Little remembers the woman as being somewhere between 130 and 170 pounds and about 5 feet, 6 inches or 5 feet, 7 inches tall.

Federal Bureau of Investigation
Pictured is a sketch Samuel Little drew of a woman he claims he killed in 1993 in Las Vegas. Little, 79, has been named by the FBI as the most prolific serial killer in U.S. history, responsible for at least 50 killings of women over nearly 40 years.
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Samuel Little Victims 13

Photo Credit: Federal Bureau of Investigation
Pictured is a sketch Samuel Little drew of a woman he claims he killed in 1993 in Las Vegas. Little, 79, has been named by the FBI as the most prolific serial killer in U.S. history, responsible for at least 50 killings of women over nearly 40 years.

Little told Holland he was driving a yellow 1978 Cadillac Eldorado to Los Angeles in 1993 when he passed through Las Vegas, where he met a thin, dark-skinned black woman about 40 years old. He said he believed she had naturally short hair but was wearing a long wig.

“She’s out there hustling. I think she was a drug addict because she wouldn’t been out there,” Little said in his confession.

He said he met the woman’s son that day, on Owens Avenue in Vegas. He described it as the “black section” of the city.

“The boy came, that was her son, and she called him over there,” Little said. “And he came over and (said), ‘Hey, how you doing?’ Shook my hand and everything.”

According to FBI officials, Little confessed to taking the woman to a motel room, where he strangled her to death. He placed her body in the trunk of his Eldorado and drove to the outskirts of Vegas.

“I was headed toward California. So as I drove out of Las Vegas, I seen a motel and a road leading up to the motel,” Little said. “And a lot of bushes and brushes beside the road, before you got to that motel. That’s where I dropped her.

“Pulled her body out and rolled it down there. And I heard a secondary road noise that meant she was still rolling.”

“So, you basically roll her into a pretty big ditch that’s got a bunch of …,” Holland said.

“Well, it wasn’t a ditch. It was a slope,” Little said.

Little said the slope didn’t necessarily look like one because of the vegetation growing out of it.

“It looked like, even though, you would think that the road would just be flat, but actually the road was going down the slope way. And that’s why she rolled,” he said.

Little described the woman as about 110 to 120 pounds and about 5 feet, 5 inches tall, authorities said.

“He … threw her clothes out further down the road. It is highly likely that her body was never found,” FBI officials said.

Federal Bureau of Investigation
Pictured is a sketch Samuel Little drew of a woman he says he killed in 1994 in Arkansas. Little, 79, has been named by the FBI as the most prolific serial killer in U.S. history, responsible for at least 50 killings of women over nearly 40 years.
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Samuel Little Victims 09

Photo Credit: Federal Bureau of Investigation
Pictured is a sketch Samuel Little drew of a woman he says he killed in 1994 in Arkansas. Little, 79, has been named by the FBI as the most prolific serial killer in U.S. history, responsible for at least 50 killings of women over nearly 40 years.

Little told Holland he met a black transient woman in Little Rock sometime between 1992 and 1994. She was about 24 years old and it may have been snowing when they met.

“Oh, man, I loved her,” Little said in his confession. “I forget her name … oh wait, I think it was Ruth. She was a heavy set, big old yellow gal. And had buck teeth. Had a gap between her teeth. That’s what it was. And she, she was light ... honey-colored skin.”

Little said he and Ruth met at a crack house, where she and about six other girls were sitting on the porch, and stayed together for about three days before he killed her.

They shoplifted together at Sears and a Kroger in North Little Rock, where Little recalled being arrested for the crime.

“Records indicate that Little was in fact arrested by North Little Rock Police Department for shoplifting from a Kroger on April 20, 1994,” according to FBI agents.

Little said he was released from jail after the Kroger manager dropped the charges so Little could move his vehicle, then either a 1978 yellow Cadillac El Dorado or a yellow Dodge, off the grocery store’s property. Ruth was apparently sleeping in the car while Little was in custody.

“I guess he got tired of her laying around on his property in that car,” Little told Holland.

According to authorities, Little said he drove the woman to meet up with her ex-boyfriend, a man called “Bear” who Little believes has since died, and then drove her to North Little Rock, where her mother lived.

The next day, Little picked Ruth up and drove toward either Benton or Bentonville.

“What’s that place where Walmart’s, uh, original store?” Little asked Holland.

Outside of Little Rock, Little said he drove down a dirt road and manually strangled Ruth to death, authorities said.

“I whipped off the road and backed into that little woods. It was a corn field back there,” Little said, according to transcripts. “I pulled through it. And on the other side was a corn field with a trash pile.

“Well, I parked the car face it out where I could see anybody coming in. So I pulled her out of the car. She’s too big for me to carry, carry her. So I just pulled her out of the car, laid her on that trash ... that was left there.”

Little said he left Ruth’s body on a pile of branches and old cornstalks. He described her as weighing about 200 pounds and standing between 5 feet, 5 inches and 5 feet, 7 inches tall.

Who is Samuel Little?

Little, who was reportedly born to a prostitute mother in 1940, has a criminal history dating back to 1956, including murder accusations of which he was cleared in Florida and Mississippi. The AP reported that his first arrest was for a burglary at the age of 16.

He served time in a youth facility for that crime, the AP said.

Between 1957 and 1975, Little, who sometimes used the alias Samuel McDowell, was arrested 26 times in 11 states. The New York Times reported that, all together, Little had been arrested nearly 100 times in his lifetime.

Before his murder convictions, he had served less than 10 years in prison for those crimes.

Federal Bureau of Investigation
A timeline of booking photos of Samuel Little is shown. Little, 79, has confessed to 93 murders and FBI agents, who have confirmed 50 of those killings, have named him the most prolific serial killer in U.S. history.
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Samuel Little Victims 03

Photo Credit: Federal Bureau of Investigation
A timeline of booking photos of Samuel Little is shown. Little, 79, has confessed to 93 murders and FBI agents, who have confirmed 50 of those killings, have named him the most prolific serial killer in U.S. history.

The charges he was booked on included shoplifting, theft, assault, rape, aggravated assault on a police officer, DUI, fraud, breaking and entering and solicitation of a prostitute, the AP said. He was convicted in 1976 of assaulting a Missouri woman, with the intent to rape her, and spent three months in a county jail.

Little was charged in 1982 with murdering Patricia Ann Mount, who was found dead in Forest Glove, Florida, and Melinda LaPree, whose skeletal remains were found in a Gautier, Mississippi, cemetery, the AP reported.

Despite witnesses identifying Little as the man last seen with LaPree in Pascagoula a month before her remains were found, a grand jury failed to indict him in the case.

He was also cleared of attacking two prostitutes who had come forward and claimed Little assaulted them in 1980 and 1981.

He was extradited to Florida, where he was acquitted in 1984 of Mount’s slaying.

Authorities’ timeline of Little’s movements shows he was accused of assaulting a woman in San Diego in October 1984, nine months after his Florida acquittal. Tried for attempted murder, the jury deadlocked and Little later pleaded guilty to assault and false imprisonment, the AP reported.

AP Photo/Jae C. Hong
Brenda Gordon looks at photos of her mother, Carol Alford, at her apartment in Los Angeles in March 2013. Alford was a victim of Samuel Little, who has been named by the FBI as the most prolific serial killer in U.S. history.
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Samuel Little Victims 04

Photo Credit: AP Photo/Jae C. Hong
Brenda Gordon looks at photos of her mother, Carol Alford, at her apartment in Los Angeles in March 2013. Alford was a victim of Samuel Little, who has been named by the FBI as the most prolific serial killer in U.S. history.

Paroled in February 1987, he moved to Los Angeles, where Carol Alford was found dead in an alley on July 13, authorities said.

Audrey Nelson was found strangled in a downtown dumpster on Aug. 14, 1989, the timeline shows. Guadalupe Apodaca was found dead on Sept. 3 of that same year, dumped in an abandoned commercial garage.

Little continued to rack up arrests on minor charges, like burglary, theft, shoplifting and drunken driving until 2012. That was when cold case detectives with the Los Angeles Police Department linked him through DNA evidence to the unsolved homicides of Apodaca and Nelson.

According to a 2013 LAPD news release, Little was tracked down at a Kentucky homeless shelter and arrested on a California drug warrant from 2009. He was extradited to Los Angeles County, where he sat in jail while cold case detectives Mitzi Roberts, Rick Jackson and Tim Marcia built murder cases against him.

In November 2012, Little was connected through DNA analysis to the killing of Carol Alford, the release said.

AP Photos/Nick Ut
Family members of murder victims Audrey Nelson, pictured in the framed photos, and Guadalupe Apodaca attend a 2014 news conference in Los Angeles. Nelson and Apodaca were victims of serial killer Samuel Little, the most prolific in U.S. history.
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Samuel Little Victims 14

Photo Credit: AP Photos/Nick Ut
Family members of murder victims Audrey Nelson, pictured in the framed photos, and Guadalupe Apodaca attend a 2014 news conference in Los Angeles. Nelson and Apodaca were victims of serial killer Samuel Little, the most prolific in U.S. history.

The Los Angeles Times reported in December that the DNA evidence came from semen on the shirts of two of the victims and skin under the fingernails of the third.

Investigators told The New York Times that Little showed no remorse for the murders. A Louisiana detective told the newspaper Little told her he had no need to fear God.

“He said God made him this way, so why should he ask for forgiveness?” Sgt. Crystal LeBlanc, of the Opelousas Police Department, said. “He said God knew everything he did.”

Little also seemed to get excited talking about his crimes, sometimes chuckling as he recounted how he took his victims’ lives.

“Believe it or not, you only see evil a few times in your career,” Marcia told The New York Times. “Looking into his eyes, I would say that was pure evil.”

AP Photo/Jae C. Hong
Tony Zambrano, son of murder victim Guadalupe Apodaca, is pictured in a March 2013 photo. Apodaca was one of at least 50 women authorities say were killed by Samuel Little, who the FBI has named the most prolific serial killer in U.S. history.
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Samuel Little victims 16

Photo Credit: AP Photo/Jae C. Hong
Tony Zambrano, son of murder victim Guadalupe Apodaca, is pictured in a March 2013 photo. Apodaca was one of at least 50 women authorities say were killed by Samuel Little, who the FBI has named the most prolific serial killer in U.S. history.

Little was convicted of the three Los Angeles killings in 2014 and sentenced to consecutive life sentences, without the possibility of parole. In court, he loudly protested his innocence, according to the AP.

FBI officials said that in the middle of the California serial killer case against Little, LAPD investigators notified the bureau’s Violent Criminal Apprehension Program, or ViCAP, of what they were working on.

ViCAP agents began a comprehensive background investigation of Little, who was born in Georgia but raised by his grandmother in Lorain, Ohio.

What the agents found was shocking. Again and again, throughout multiple states, ViCAP analysts found Little’s travels over the decades intersecting with “long-cold investigations into bodies and bones,” the Los Angeles Times reported.

“The FBI found an alarming pattern and compelling links to many more murders,” the FBI said in a statement last year.

One case in particular led ViCAP analysts to Texas.

“We found a case out of Odessa, Texas, that sounded very much like him, and we could place him passing through the area around the same time,” ViCAP crime analyst Christie Palazzolo said in November. “We sent that lead out to the Texas Rangers, who were eager to follow up on the long-cold case.”

The Odessa case was the 1994 strangulation death of Denise Brothers, whose body was found partially clothed in some bushes in a vacant lot. The Los Angeles Times reported that records showed Little had interactions with the Odessa Police Department around that time, meaning he was in town when Brothers was slain.

“This just felt like him,” Palazzolo told the newspaper.

Little pleaded guilty in December to killing Brothers.

ViCAP sent out a national alert in June 2013 asking cold case detectives across the country to check their files for cases similar to those in which Little was accused.

In Texas, the Little case landed on the radar of Holland, who the Los Angeles Times reported specializes in the study of sociopaths and psychopaths -- and how to properly interview them.

At a December 2017 law enforcement conference in Tampa, Florida, where Holland gave a presentation, detectives from Florida asked Holland and Angela Williamson, a ViCAP liaison and Department of Justice senior policy adviser, if they knew anything about Little. Little, who was in prison for the Alford, Apodaca and Nelson murders in Los Angeles, was suspected in killings in Florida as well, the Los Angeles Times reported.

Holland and Williamson promised to look into the case.

Williamson told the newspaper that Holland called her the following March at ViCAP, saying they had to do something “about this Little guy.”

Williamson said she turned in her seat to Palazzolo, who told her to tell Holland about the Odessa case.

A few weeks later, on May 17, 2018, Holland, Palazzolo and Williamson traveled to California to interview Little. According to the Los Angeles Times, they brought with them the Odessa case file, newspaper clippings and the details Palazzolo had tracked down about Little’s life.

“I was pretty pessimistic,” Palazzolo told the newspaper. “I thought he would just tell us to leave. Remember, he hadn’t spoken to anyone about any of this. Why would he?”

Little was initially tight-lipped, but within an hour of conversation with Holland, he began to talk in exchange for a transfer from the Los Angeles County Jail to the jail in Ector County, which was quieter, according to The New York Times.

It took 650 hours over 16 months, but Little told Holland details of the 93 women he claims to have killed over a span of nearly 40 years. The tally included the murders of Mount in Florida and LaPree in Mississippi, the Los Angeles Times reported.

In Los Angeles alone, Little said he killed 18 women.

“Over the course of that interview in May, he went through city and state and gave Ranger Holland the number of people he killed in each place,” Palazzolo said last fall. “Jackson, Mississippi -- one; Cincinnati, Ohio -- one; Phoenix, Arizona -- three; Las Vegas, Nevada -- one.”

Over his multiple interviews with Holland, Little ultimately confessed to killings in 19 states. Most were women and almost all were strangled, according to the FBI.

‘Why do you keep touching my neck? Are you a serial killer?’

FBI records show that authorities are still working to match confessions to more than 40 women Little has claimed as victims, many of whom he drew sketches, in Arizona, Arkansas, California, Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Louisiana, Mississippi, Nevada, Ohio, South Carolina and Texas.

At least eight of the victims listed on the FBI’s webpage about Little have been matched to Jane Does in multiple states, closing cold cases across the country.

In November 2018, authorities in Opelousas, Louisiana, announced that Little had confessed to the January 1996 murder of Melissa Thomas, 24, who was found strangled underneath a pecan tree in the cemetery of a Baptist church.

According to The New York Times, police there sent LeBlanc to Texas, where Little was jailed awaiting trial in Brothers’ death, to interview him about Thomas’ killing. Over the span of two hours, LeBlanc learned that Little knew Opelousas well, including the town’s streets, bars and the location of the church cemetery.

Little told the detective he and Thomas met on the street and went to the cemetery to do drugs together, the newspaper reported. He said they then moved into the back seat of his car for sex, at which time he began stroking Thomas’ neck.

“He said that she said, ‘Why do you keep touching my neck? Are you a serial killer?’” LeBlanc told The New York Times.

Little became enraged and strangled Thomas to death, LeBlanc said.

Opelousas police Chief Donald Thomas, who was until recently the lead investigator on the Thomas case, told The Opelousas Daily World that the case always stuck with him.

“The ending is sort of bittersweet for me, the family and this city,” Thompson told the Daily World. “It was also personal for me. I know (Thomas’) family well. A tragedy like this never goes away for the family and for all of us on the force who worked with such a passion to solve the case.”

Police that same month announced that Little had confessed to another two Louisiana killings, one in 1982 and another in 1996. Little was living in Terrebonne Parish, about 150 miles from Opelousas, at the time.

Houma police officials said that Little confessed to their detectives and Louisiana State Police investigators that he killed Dorothy Richard, 55, of Gray, on Sept. 14, 1982. Daisy McGuire, 40, of Houma, was found dead Feb. 6, 1996.

Monique Stepter, Richard’s granddaughter, told Houma Today that the confession opened a bevy of wounds for the family that had never healed.

“It’s very hard right now for the entire family,” said Stepter, who was 5 years old when her grandmother was killed. “I have kids that never met her. There are a lot of great-grandchildren who are left without their grandmother because of him.”

Little also in November confessed to the Aug. 26, 1979, slaying of Brenda Alexander, 23, in Phenix City, Alabama. According to the Ledger-Enquirer in nearby Columbus, Georgia, Little told detectives he met Alexander at a dance club in Columbus. They left the club together.

Phenix City police Capt. Jason Whitten told the newspaper a detail of Little’s demeanor as he described getting Alexander into his car.

“He wringed his hands together, smiled and said, ‘I knew she was mine,” Whitten said.

Alexander’s body, naked except for a Timex watch, was found discarded in a wooded area, the newspaper said.

Other slayings Little has confessed to include the 1978 killing of Julia Critchfield, 36, who was strangled and thrown off a cliff in the Gulfport, Mississippi, area; the killing of Evelyn Weston, 19, near Fort Jackson, South Carolina, in 1978; and the slaying of Rosie Hill, 20, in 1982 in Marion County, Florida.

The names and faces go on and on.

AP Photo/Jeffrey Collins
Richland County Sheriff Leon Lott’s handwritten notes from the 1978 killing of Evelyn Weston are pictured in Columbia, S.C. Weston is an alleged victim of Samuel Little, who the FBI has named the most prolific serial killer in U.S. history.
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Samuel Little Victims 10

Photo Credit: AP Photo/Jeffrey Collins
Richland County Sheriff Leon Lott’s handwritten notes from the 1978 killing of Evelyn Weston are pictured in Columbia, S.C. Weston is an alleged victim of Samuel Little, who the FBI has named the most prolific serial killer in U.S. history.

Investigators told the Los Angeles Times that Little’s memory is nearly photographic when it comes to the victims and details of their deaths, including one woman’s last meal.

Cold case detectives were able to verify Little’s confession in that case by reviewing her autopsy report, which listed her stomach contents, the newspaper said.

“It’s scary the clarity he has about certain things after all this time,” Marion County Sheriff’s Office Sgt. Michael Mongeluzzo, who questioned Little about Hill’s death, told The New York Times. “He remembers names and faces.”

His recall of dates has been less accurate.

“When you spent your life living in your car, things tend to blur,” Williamson told the Los Angeles Times. “You can imagine calling a police department and saying you have a potential homicide that occurred off a dirt road in 1984, or it could be 1974, or 1994. Did they even find the body? If they did, was it just bones?”

The FBI now needs the public’s help to identify the remaining unidentified women Little claims that he killed.

“For many years, Samuel Little believed he would not be caught because he thought no one was accounting for his victims,” Palazzolo said in a statement last week. “Even though he is already in prison, the FBI believes it is important to seek justice for each victim (and) to close every case possible.”

Anyone with information linked to Little’s confessions is asked to contact the FBI at 1-800-CALL-FBI or to submit tips online at tips.fbi.gov.

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Local News

  • A mistrial has been declared by Athens Judge David Sweat in the courthouse hacking case involving a Gwinnett County judge. Channel 2 Gwinnett County Bureau Chief Tony Thomas said Superior Court Judge Kathryn Schrader walked out of court without comment as she remains suspended from the bench on charges that she hired three men to hack into the county computer system amid fears the district attorney’s office was spying on her. After the mistrial, the jury foreperson, Rachel Steahr, told Thomas she was frustrated because basically the evidence didn’t provide any clear answers to what happened. “There was a lot of evidence and it was really good, but either side it wasn't strong enough. They needed more since they didn’t come to a conclusion of how this happened,” Steahr said. She said a majority of jurors thought Schrader was not guilty on count one of computer trespassing, were split on the second charge and wanted to convict on the third charge. Prosecutors said they are now trying to figure out if they want to retry this case. “We are going to continue to reevaluate the case. We are going to be in discussion with the executive director and make a decision,” prosecutor John Regan said. Schrader’s attorney maintains her client is innocent. “I'm always relieved when it's clear our message was heard. She is not guilty,” said defense attorney BJ Bernstein. Prosecutors said it remains unclear when they may retry the case, but they are hoping to make it happen sooner rather than later.
  • We are learning more about the three University of Georgia employees arrested last week on theft charges: Amy Stowers is from Gainesville and was manager of the University’s Vision Clinic. She’s facing felony charges, accused of masterminding a bribery scheme that netted a reported $2,500 from eyeglass vendors. Two other women are facing misdemeanor counts after taking gift cards from vendors, cards said to have been worth several hundred dollars.From Asia Simone Burns, AJC… Amy Stowers, Rita Melville and Jamie Fay Coley were each taken into custody in connection with the investigation.  Police said Stowers, who managed the University Health Center Vision Clinic, orchestrated the bribery scheme. According to the police report, she made a “prohibited” agreement with an optical vendor, who was not named. The vendor would give her gift cards, and in exchange she would lead the vendor to believe it would “influence the performance of her official duties,” the report said.                    Stowers received about $2,550 in gift cards from the vendor, police said.  As part of the same agreement, Melville and Coley, who were opticians in the clinic, received $348 and $404 in gift cards, respectively.  The funds stemmed from the sale of eyewear frames, the report said. The women were able to convert the proceeds for personal use.  Stowers is facing four counts of felony bribery, while Coley and Melville each face six counts of misdemeanor theft by conversion. Stowers was booked into the Clarke County Jail on Wednesday and released the following day on a $44,400 bond. Coley and Melville were both booked into the jail Friday morning and released the same day on $10,100 bonds.
  • The Newton County parents convicted of murder says there is no evidence they killed their 2-week-old daughter.  Both Christopher Michael McNabb and Cortney Marie Bell have filed motions for new trials, according to documents filed in Newton Superior Clerk. Both were convicted of killing baby Caliyah in May 2019.  In his motion filed Monday, McNabb says prosecutors were unable to prove he killed baby Caliyah and that his prior attorney was ineffective during the trial.  “There was no physical or direct evidence produced that demonstrated that Mr. McNabb caused the child’s death. Nor was the State able to demonstrate what actually caused the child’s severe injuries,” McNabb’s motion states. “The thrust of the State’s case was that Mr. McNabb was a bad man that lived in a bad environment.” In her motion for a new trial, filed in late January, Bell also says prosecutors did not prove she was responsible for Caliyah’s death.  “The State did not prove that Ms. Bell caused Caliyah’s death, at best they attempted at trial to prove that she contributed to the circumstances that led to Caliyah’s death,” her motion states.  A jury deliberated about an hour before convicting both McNabb and Bell following a joint trial. McNabb was sentenced to life in prison without parole, Bell to 30 years with 15 to serve. But both parents were adamant they weren’t responsible for Caliyah’s death.  “I’m innocent. I didn’t do it,” McNabb told Judge John Ott before his sentencing. “If you ever find out who did it, they deserve to be under the jail.” In October 2017, Bell reported the baby missing from the family’s mobile home. That night, McNabb angrily demanded the child’s return in front of television cameras. It’s likely that Caliyah was already dead by the time McNabb pleaded for the community’s help in finding her, according to investigators. 
  • Athens Democrats hold a debate watch party tonight, as Democratic presidential candidates take the stage in Las Vegas in advance of Saturday’s Nevada caucuses. Tonight’s local viewing is set for 8 o’clock at Little Italy on Lumpkin Street in downtown Athens. The debate—the first to include former New York City Mayor Mike Bloomberg--can be heard live on WGAU. It starts at 9 o’clock, with television on MSNBC. From Facebook… Join your fellow democratic socialists for some #yallidarity and FREE PIZZA! We'll gather in the back room of Little Italy downtown, and cheer Bernie on as he continues to rise above the fray of the party establishment. It's the first debate featuring American Oligarch and proud stop-and-frisk-er Michael Bloomberg, so it's a must-watch. Come have fun with like-minded folks, and learn more about how you can get involved with Athens Area DSA... we need your ideas and energy!
  • Barrow County state Rep Terry England says he will be a candidate for reelection: Republican England chairs the House Appropriations Committee. He was first elected in 2012. From Facebook… IT'S OFFICIAL: I'M RUNNING FOR RE-ELECTION With your support, I hope to serve another term in the Georgia House of Representatives. I will submit my paperwork on March 2, which is the first day for candidates to qualify. We will formally kick off the re-election campaign after the end of this legislative session. It is such an honor and a privilege to be able to represent the county where I was born and raised! — Terry

Bulldog News

  • ATHENS Georgia basketball coach Tom Crean is referring to it as an 'opportunity' game when the Bulldogs take on SEC powerhouse Auburn. Bruce Pearl looks at it as a 'must-win' for his Tigers. Georgia (12-13, 2-10 SEC) plays against No. 13-ranked Auburn (22-3, 9-3) at 7 p.m. with a sold-out crowd awaiting the tip at Stegeman Coliseum (TV: ESPN2). ' We have tremendous opportunity tomorrow night with Auburn, and the way that they're playing,' Crean said. 'They pose numerous challenges as most everybody else in this league does but especially the way they're playing. 'The way they're getting fouled right now, the way their offensive rebounding the ball, extremely high levels, playing extremely fast, aggressive. They play with great confidence and are playing like a veteran team.' Auburn is coming off a shocking 85-73 road loss to Missouri, a defeat that could be attributed to a 1-of-17 shooting night beyond the 3-point arc. Bruce Pearl's team did, however, get to the free-throw line to attempt an eye-popping 46 free throws. 'I look at it this way: the Georgia game is a must-win if we're going to stay in this conference championship race,' Pearl said. Kentucky is a game up on Auburn with its Tuesday night win over LSU. '(Georgia is a) tough place to play, hard to win on the road, but if we're going to be in this conference championship race, we have to win the game,' Pearl said. 'Strong statement with seven games left, but I've always kept it real with my team.' Georgia expects to have a healthy Anthony Edwards primed for the meeting. Edwards, recently projected by ESPN to be the No. 1 pick in the upcoming NBA draft, has been battling flu-like symptoms during the Bulldogs' four-game losing streak. Crean stressed the importance of team focus for the upcoming game. Junior forward Rayshaun Hammonds has shown signs of returning to form after going through a self-admitted slump. Freshman point guard Sahvir Wheeler appears recovered from an ankle injury that slowed him during the team's four-game losing streak the second half of January. If the Bulldogs can get Edwards, Hammonds and Wheeler healthy and playing well at the same time, it would greatly improve the team's chances for a strong finish. 'We just need to focus on playing well,' Crean said. 'Like playing longer stretches together, talking through it, playing with confidence not, you know, not waiting for the bottom to fall out right and that's what happens sometimes with teams it's just keeps playing.' A loud home crowd could go a long way for the Bulldogs on Wednesday night with the team looking to snap out of a funk that's seen it lose eight of the last nine games. Auburn won the first meeting between the teams this season, 82-60, on Jan. 11 in Auburn. The post Georgia basketball braces for Auburn team bringing must-win' mentality to sold-out Stegeman Coliseum appeared first on DawgNation.
  • ATHENS Georgia football coach Kirby Smart and athletic director Greg McGarity had plenty to say about the Bulldogs adding Clemson to the 2021 schedule on Tuesday. Smart, always an advocate for his players and the UGA fans, pointed to the unique experience the game creates. 'This is another great opportunity to schedule a national non-conference game with a top level opponent,' Smart said in the school release. 'Playing a regular season game in Charlotte will give our fans the opportunity for a completely new experience in a great city and top level stadium. I know our coaches and players will be excited for the challenge to kick off the season in this kind of environment.' Smart said last summer he wanted the Bulldogs on the national stage via scheduling. RELATED: Georgia football schedule boosted with national championship caliber opponent McGarity is already thinking about the national television exposure and branding the University of Georgia will receive coast to coast and perhaps even globally with a game like this. 'The eyes of the nation will be on Charlotte as we start the 2021 season,' McGarity said in the release. 'It is yet another opportunity to strengthen our schedule and provide an opportunity for our supporters to enjoy another huge matchup. We will now have at least two Power 5 opponents on our schedule through 2033.' Georgia's previously announced home-and-home series with Power 5 non-conference opponents include: Two with Clemson (2029 at Clemson and 2030 in Athens, and 2032 in Athens and 2033 at Clemson); Texas (2028 at Austin and 2029 in Athens) UCLA (2025 in Pasadena and 2026 in Athens) Florida State (2027 in Tallahassee and 2028 in Athens) Oklahoma (2023 in Norman and 2031 in Athens) Ohio State (2030 in Athens and 2031 in Columbus). The Bulldogs also have three neutral site Power 5 games in the Chick-fil-A Kickoff Game at Atlanta's Mercedes Benz Stadium: 2020 vs. Virginia; 2022 vs. Oregon; and 2024 vs. Clemson. The post Georgia football coach Kirby Smart on playing Clemson in Charlotte: completely new experience' appeared first on DawgNation.
  • ATHENS Georgia football has taken yet another step in beefing up its future schedule, agreeing to open the 2021 season against Clemson. NEWS: Georgia football beefs up 2021 schedule by adding Clemson Tigers Kirby Smart declared last summer 'I want Georgia on the national stage.' And now he has backed it up with what promises to be a much-anticipated, nationally televised showdown. Kirby Smart throws down gauntlet on national scheduling The addition of Clemson to the 2021 schedule indicates that UGA will either buy out or drop the currently slated Sept. 4 opening game at Sanford Stadium against San Jose State. Brett McMurphy reported the Clemson game could take place on Thursday, Sept. 2. The Bulldogs' other non-conference games in 2021 are against UAB (Sept. 11), FCS Charleston Southern (Nov. 20) and Georgia Tech (Nov. 27). CLOSER LOOK: Examining Georgia football future schedules DawgNation reported last spring that Clemson coach Dabo Swinney was eager to schedule Georgia. RELATED: Clemson coach Dabo Swinney wants more Georgia 'We should play Georgia every year if it was up to me,' Swinney said last April. 'We're 80 miles, and they need a game, we need a game. We had to travel to Texas A&M (2018), when we could have gone 80 miles.' Swinney talked exclusively to DawgNation about the rich history of what was once an annual rivalry. 'For years and years and years, Clemson and Georgia played every year, and somewhere along the line that went away,' Swinney said. 'It's a tough game because they are one of the best teams in the country, but it's great game for the fans, and we have to play people. I'd just as soon play them than have to go all the way somewhere else to get a game.' Georgia coach Kirby Smart has talked several times about wanting to increase the Bulldogs' schedule difficulty, likely in anticipation of an expanded College Football Playoff model. 'I just think that's the way football's headed, I'll be honest with you,' Smart said, discussing his desire to add more Power 5 non-conference opponents. 'I think the day of playing more competitive games, there's more parity in our conference. I think going out and playing tougher opponents is a good thing.' The forefathers at Clemson and Georgia were in agreement. UGA and Clemson played every year from 1897-1916, and all but two seasons from 1962 to 1987. Upon SEC expansion in 1992, Georgia had home-and-home series with Clemson in 1990-1991, 1994-1995, 1998-1999 and 2002-2003. Clemson plays in-state rival South Carolina as a non-conference home-and-home every season, just as Georgia is saddled with in-state non-conference opponent Georgia Tech annually. UGA and Clemson will also open their respective 2024 seasons against one another on Aug. 31 in Mercedes-Benz Stadium in Atlanta. The teams have a home-and-home series scheduled for 2029 and 2030. The Bulldogs play at Clemson in 2029. The Tigers will play the return game in Athens in 2030. 'I don't run from that competition,' Smart said. 'I think it's the best thing for the game.' 2020 Non-conference opponents Sept. 7 vs. Virginia in Atlanta Sept. 12 East Tennessee State Sept. 26 Louisiana-Monroe Nov. 28 Georgia Tech SEC opponents Sept. 19 at Alabama Oct. 3 vs. Vanderbilt Oct. 10 vs. Auburn Oct. 17 at Missouri Oct. 31 at Florida, at Jacksonville Nov. 7 at South Carolina Nov. 14 vs. Tennessee Nov. 21 at Kentucky 2021 Non-conference opponents TBA Power 5 opponent Sept. 4 San Jose State Sept. 11 UAB Nov. 27 at Georgia Tech SEC opponents Arkansas at Auburn Florida at Jacksonville at Tennessee Kentucky Missouri at Vanderbilt South Carolina 2022 Non-conference opponents TBA Non-Power 5 opponent Sept. 3 vs. Oregon in Atlanta Sept. 24 Kent State Nov. 26 Georgia Tech SEC opponents at Mississippi State Auburn Florida (Jacksonville/Athens Jax contract runs through 2021) Tennessee at Kentucky at Missouri Vanderbilt at South Carolina 2023 Non-conference opponents TBA Power 5 opponent TBA Non-Power 5 opponent TBA Indiana State Nov. 25 at Georgia Tech SEC opponents Ole Miss at Auburn Florida(Jacksonville/Gainesville Jax contract runs through 2021) at Tennessee Kentucky Missouri at Vanderbilt South Carolina 2024 Non-conference opponents Aug. 31 vs. Clemson in Atlanta TBA Non-Power 5 opponent TBA Non-Power 5 opponent Nov. 30 Georgia Tech SEC opponents at Texas A&M Auburn Florida(Jacksonville/Athens Jax contract runs through 2021) Tennessee at Kentucky at Missouri Vanderbilt at South Carolina 2025 Non-conference opponents Aug. 30 at UCLA TBA Non-Power 5 opponent TBA Non-Power 5 opponent Nov. 29 at Georgia Tech SEC opponents LSU at Auburn Florida(Jacksonville/Gainesville, Jax contract runs through 2021) at Tennessee Kentucky Missouri at Vanderbilt South Carolina 2026 Non-conference opponents Sept. 5 UCLA TBA Non-Power 5 opponent TBA Non-Power 5 opponent Nov. 28 Georgia Tech SEC opponents at Arkansas* (projected rotation beyond official schedule through 2025) Auburn Florida(Jacksonville/Athens Jax contract runs through 2021) Tennessee at Kentucky at Missouri Vanderbilt at South Carolina 2027 Non-conference opponents Sept. 4 at Florida State TBA Non-Power 5 opponent TBA Non-Power 5 opponent Nov. 27 at Georgia Tech SEC opponents Alabama* (projected rotation beyond official schedule through 2025) at Auburn Florida(Jacksonville/Gainesville Jax contract runs through 2021) at Tennessee Kentucky Missouri at Vanderbilt South Carolina 2028 Non-conference opponents Sept. 2 at Texas Sept. 16 Florida State TBA Non-Power 5 opponent Nov. 25 Georgia Tech SEC opponents at Ole Miss* (projected rotation beyond official schedule through 2025) Auburn Florida(Jacksonville/Athens Jax contract runs through 2021) Tennessee at Kentucky at Missouri Vanderbilt at South Carolina 2029 Non-conference opponents Sept. 1 Texas Sept. 15 at Clemson TBA Non-Power 5 opponent Nov. 24 at Georgia Tech SEC opponents Mississippi State* (projected rotation beyond official schedule through 2025) at Auburn Florida(Jacksonville/Gainesville Jax contract runs through 2021) at Tennessee Kentucky Missouri at Vanderbilt South Carolina 2030 Non-conference opponents Aug. 31 Clemson TBA Non-Power 5 opponent TBA Non-Power 5 opponent Nov. 30 Georgia Tech SEC opponents at LSU* (projected rotation beyond official schedule through 2025) Auburn Florida(Jacksonville/Athens Jax contract runs through 2023) RELATED: Greg McGarity clarifies new Georgia football rivalry schedule with Florida Tennessee at Kentucky at Missouri Vanderbilt at South Carolina The post Georgia football schedule in 2021 adds Clemson in neutral site opener appeared first on DawgNation.
  • Add Austin Blaske to the list of signees in the 2020 Georgia football signing class that won a state championship during their senior year. The South Effingham (Guyton, Ga.) didn't win his on the football field, though. The 6-foot-5, 305-pound future interior offensive lineman at UGA slimmed down some 20 pounds to be able to wrestle in the heavyweight division of the Georgia High School Association's Class 5A state tournament. The 5A state meet, which concluded this past weekend in Macon, ended with Blaske's arm held high. The 3-star prospect finished the 2020 cycle rated as the nation's No. 41 OT and the No. 526 overall prospect on the 247Sports Composite ratings. In the wake of Sam Pittman taking over the head coaching position at Arkansas, it saw the Bulldogs lose OT commitment Josh Braun to Florida. The Bulldogs worked quickly with the evaluation of new line coach Matt. Luke and sought to add both Blaske and New Jersey native Devin Willock to the offensive line room during the early signing period. RELATED: Austin Blaske signs with Georgia Blaske, a life-long Georgia fan, de-committed from a long pledge to N.C. State soon after receiving his offer from Luke. He then signed with the Bulldogs on the first day of the early period. It was actually a bit of an upset. 'Beefy' entered the state meet after a third-place finish in the 5A sectionals. The South Effingham standout was credited with four pins in the state meet, including one in the second round which secured the state title. Don Heath of the Savannah Morning News reported that Blaske finished his senior season with a 45-3 record on the mat. #SoHam boys did their best to hang with the crew from @bowdonrecruits today. Best performance of the day was @AustinBlaske hitting 5005 #SouthStrong pic.twitter.com/kpoQVN14Y9 Mike Pfiester (@Coach_Pfiester) December 11, 2019 Blaske has great lower beg strength and overall agility to play the position. Georgia signed four All-American offensive linemen among its seven-member class for Luke's room in 2020, but he is an impressive athlete in his own right. Blaske is every bit a character in his own right. Check out a tweet that highlighted his mood after a South Effingham game earlier this season. pic.twitter.com/GEvyMM99cm T. Andrew 'Coach' Blaske (@blaske_t) February 9, 2020 He was also channeling professional wrestling Steve 'Stone Cold' Austin heading into the state meet. Almost that time pic.twitter.com/wZ3BM6zChq Austin Blaske (@AustinBlaske) February 15, 2020 The post WATCH: 2020 Georgia football signee Austin Blaske wins state heavyweight wrestling title appeared first on DawgNation.
  • ATHENS The 2020 NFL Combine is just more than a week away, but you can bet it can't get here soon enough for at least three of Georgia's highest-projected players. RELATED: The 10 Georgia football players invited to 2020 NFL Combine Andrew Thomas, D'Andre Swift and Jake Fromm, expected to be picked as early as the first round in that order, have trailed off in recent NFL mock drafts. In one sense, that's somewhat logical considering all three are underclassmen who did not have the benefit of a Senior Bowl or East-West Shrine Game all-star appearance to boost their stock. Thomas elected to sit out the Sugar Bowl, where he could have impressed going up against Big 12 Player of the Year James Lynch. Swift, meanwhile, was limited in the postseason after getting knocked out of the Georgia Tech game with a bruised shoulder. But there's also a shell game of sorts taking place. It's common for NFL teams to hide their interest in a player right up until draft day, to the extent some get selected by teams that didn't interview them during the process. Still, a recent mock draft from CBSsports.com analyst Chris Trapasso raised eyebrows when it excluded Swift as a projected first-round pick. Swift has almost universally been projected as the top tailback in the NFL draft with most predicting he will be selected in the first round by Miami with the 18th overall pick, if not the Dolphins' selection at No. 26 in the first round. Trapasso has stood firm on Andrew Thomas, however, keeping him at No. 10 to the Cleveland Brown while a handful of others have recently dropped Thomas. ESPN analyst Todd McShay dropped Thomas and Swift from his first mock draft in December to his most recent one earlier this month. McShay originally had Thomas going No. 7 overall to the New York Jets, the first offensive tackle off the draft board. But in his most recent mock early this month, McShay projected Thomas No. 18 overall to Miami, as the fifth offensive tackle selected. McShay also dropped Swift a spot, from a projected No. 21 overall landing spot at Tennessee, to No. 22 to the Buffalo Bills. RELATED: D'Andre Swift compared to two top NFL backs McShay has been vocal in his support of Fromm, saying he has first-round talent. But McShay still doesn't project a team selecting Fromm in the opening round. RELATED: Two projections Jake Fromm lands with NFL team in South NFL.com analyst and former NFL scout Bucky Brooks doesn't have Fromm ranked among the top five quarterbacks in his most recent offering. Brooks does have Swift ranked as the top tailback prospect, but he has Andrew Thomas slotted as the No. 3 offensive tackle. DawgNation: Georgia in the NFL draft Jake Fromm evaluation, comparison, per former Super Bowl scout ESPN labels Georgia a 'loser' in NFL early entry process Evaluating Andrew Thomas, why he's a first-round lock Eli Wolf, Charlie Woerner, Brian Herrien, Tyrique McGhee shine in all-star games Todd McShay projects Georgia QB Jake Fromm to have first-round talent Closer look at Jake Fromm's decision, factors and faith The post Top Georgia NFL prospects see pre-combine dip in draft status projections appeared first on DawgNation.