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    Health authorities are closely watching an outbreak of respiratory illness caused by a new virus that originated in China. Governments are stepping up surveillance of airline passengers from central China and taking other steps to try to control the outbreak. Here's what you should know about the illness: WHAT IS THE NEW VIRUS? Scientists have identified it as a new coronavirus. The name comes from the Latin word for crowns or halos, which coronaviruses resemble under a microscope. The coronavirus family has many types that affect people. Some cause the common cold while others originating in bats, camels and other animals have evolved into more severe illnesses such as SARS — severe acute respiratory syndrome — or MERS — Middle East respiratory syndrome. WHERE DID IT COME FROM? The first cases appeared last month in Wuhan, a city in central China's Hubei province. Many of the first people infected had visited or worked at the Huanan Seafood Wholesale Market in Wuhan, which has since been closed for an investigation. Chinese health officials say they believe the illness first spread from animals to people. They now say it can spread between people. HOW WIDESPREAD IS IT? China has identified 440 cases and nine deaths, most of the illnesses and all of the deaths in Hubei province. Cases have also been confirmed in Thailand, South Korea, Japan, the U.S. and Taiwan. The outbreak coincides with China's busiest travel season as people visit their families or go abroad for the Lunar New Year holiday. That travel rush is expected to spread the disease more widely. WHAT ARE THE SYMPTOMS? Common symptoms include a runny nose, headache, cough and fever. Shortness of breath, chills and body aches are associated with more dangerous kinds of coronavirus, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. In serious cases, the virus can cause pneumonia. HOW IS IT TREATED? There is a test to identify the virus, but no vaccine to prevent an infection. Patients with the virus have been isolated in hospitals or homes to prevent spreading it. The symptoms are treated with pain and fever medication, and people are advised to drink plenty of liquids and rest while they recover. HOW IS IT SPREADING? Many coronaviruses can spread through coughing or sneezing, or by touching an infected person. Scientists believe the new virus can spread from person to person in close contact through the respiratory tract. COULD IT BE AS BAD AS SARS? So far, the virus appears less dangerous and infectious than SARS, which also started in China in 2002-03 and killed about 800 people. However, viruses can mutate into more dangerous and contagious forms, and it's too early to say what will happen with this one. ___ The Associated Press Health and Science Department receives support from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute’s Department of Science Education. The AP is solely responsible for all content.
  • Chinese health authorities urged people in the city of Wuhan to avoid crowds and public gatherings after warning on Wednesday that a new viral illness infecting hundreds of people in the country and causing at least nine deaths could spread further. The number of new cases has risen sharply in China, the center of the outbreak. There were 440 confirmed cases as of midnight Tuesday in 13 jurisdictions, said Li Bin, deputy director of the National Health Commission. Nine people have died, all in Hubei province, since the outbreak emerged in its provincial capital of Wuhan late last month. “There has already been human-to-human transmission and infection of medical workers,' Li said at a news conference with health experts. “Evidence has shown that the disease has been transmitted through the respiratory tract and there is the possibility of viral mutation.' The illness comes from a newly identified type of coronavirus, a family of viruses that can cause the common cold as well as more serious illnesses such as the SARS outbreak that spread from China to more than a dozen countries in 2002-2003 and killed about 800 people. Thailand authorities Wednesday confirmed four cases, a Thai national and three Chinese visitors. Japan, South Korea, the United States and Taiwan have all reported one case each. All of the illnesses were of people from Wuhan or who recently had traveled there. “The situation is under control here,' Thailand Public Health Minister Anutin Charnvirakul told reporters, saying there are no reports of the infection spreading to others. “We checked all of them: taxi drivers, people who wheeled the wheelchairs for the patients, doctors and nurses who worked around them.' Travel agencies that organize trips to North Korea say the country has banned foreign tourists because of the outbreak. Most tourists to North Korea are either Chinese or travel to the country through neighboring China. North Korea also closed its borders in 2003 during the SARS scare. Other countries have stepped up screening measures for travelers from China, especially those arriving from Wuhan. Worries have been heightened by the coming of the Lunar New Year holiday rush, when millions of Chinese travel at home and abroad. Officials said it was too early to compare the new virus with SARS or MERS, or Middle East respiratory syndrome, in terms of how lethal it might be. They attributed the spike in new cases to improvements in detection and monitoring. “We are still in the process of learning more about this disease.” Gao Fu, an academician of the Chinese Academy of Sciences and head of the Chinese Center for Disease Control said at the same news conference. Gao said officials are working on the assumption that the outbreak resulted from human exposure to wild animals that were being traded in illegally at a food market in Wuhan and that the virus is mutating. Health officials confirmed earlier this week that the disease can be spread between humans after finding two cases of people in southern Guangdong province who had not been to Wuhan. It's not clear how contagious it is, but person-to-person transmission could allow it to spread more widely. The Lunar New Year is a time when many Chinese return to their hometowns to visit family. Li, the health commission official, said that measures were being taken to monitor and detect infected people from Wuhan, and that people should avoid going to the city and people from the city should stay put for now.
  • Militants attacked a market in Burkina Faso’s Sanmatenga province, killing at least 36 people and wounding several others, the government said Tuesday. The gunmen then burned the market, according to a government statement. The violence is the latest in a surge of attacks in the West African nation’s north that led to the displacement of more than half a million people last year. The government urged people to collaborate with defense and security forces to restore safety. President Roch Marc Kabore called for two days of national mourning beginning Wednesday for the victims of the attack. For years, Burkina Faso was spared the kind of Islamic extremism that affected neighboring Niger and Mali, where it took a 2013 French-led military intervention to dislodge jihadists from power in several major towns. Militants staged a January 2016 attack in Burkina Faso's capital, Ouagadougou, that killed at least 30 people at a cafe popular with foreigners. The following year, 18 people were killed at a Turkish restaurant in the capital. Attacks intensified in 2019 across northern Burkina Faso, and jihadists have gained more ground.
  • Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu renewed a vow to annex Israeli settlements in the West Bank as the embattled leader kicked off a third election campaign in under a year Tuesday. Addressing Likud Party supporters at a campaign launch event in Jerusalem, Netanyahu promised to “impose Israeli sovereignty on the Jordan Valley and northern Dead Sea,' then pledged to annex all Israeli West Bank settlements “without exception.' Israel captured the West Bank in the 1967 Mideast war along with east Jerusalem and the Gaza Strip. The Palestinians seek those territories as part of a future state. Most of the international community considers Israel's West Bank settlements illegal under international law. Netanyahu had previously called for the annexation of the Jordan Valley ahead of September's repeat parliamentary elections. He and other Israeli officials contend the region is crucial to defending the country’s eastern flank. Annexation of the Jordan Valley, which makes up around a quarter of the West Bank and is the territory's agricultural heartland, would make a future Palestinian state unviable and would draw condemnation from the Palestinians and much of the international community. U.N. political chief Rosemary DiCarlo reiterated at a U.N. Security Council meeting Tuesday that “all settlements are illegal under international law and remain an obstacle to peace' and warned against annexation. Among the “negative developments” undermining prospects for a two-state solution, she cited the first meeting on Jan. 5 of an Israeli ministerial committee tasked with discussing annexation plans for the Jordan Valley and Israeli authorities advancing plans on Jan. 4-5 for some 1,900 residential units in settlements in Area C — the roughly 60% of the West Bank where Israel exercises full control and where most Jewish settlements are located. “The annexation of some or all of Area C, if implemented, would deal a devastating blow to the potential of reviving negotiations, advancing regional peace, and the essence of the two-state solution,' DiCarlo warned. Riyad Mansour, the Palestinian U.N. ambassador, told the council that “neither threats nor attempts at annexation should go unchallenged.” “The urgency of stopping Israeli annexation schemes cannot be underestimated; immediate action is needed before it is too late,' he said, stressing that the U.N. Charter's prohibition on acquiring territory by force must be upheld along with Security Council resolutions reaffirming the illegality of Israeli settlements. Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas's office said in a statement that the calls to annex areas of the West Bank 'undermine the foundations of the peace process' and regional stability. In her 2019 annual report, the International Criminal Court's chief prosecutor Fatou Bensouda said her office was following Israel's proposed annexation of West Bank areas “with concern.” The U.S. has not commented on Israel's stated intentions to annex the region. Both the prime minister and his main rival, Blue and White party leader Benny Gantz, have tried to pander to hard-line nationalist voters as the election approaches. Israel faces an unprecedented third parliamentary election in under a year on March 2 after Netanyahu twice failed to form a governing coalition after April and September's votes. Earlier on Tuesday, Gantz said his party would “work toward establishing sovereignty over the Jordan Valley and we will do so based on national agreement and in coordination with the international community.” Most political analysts see the March election as a referendum on Netanyahu's ability to lead following his indictment on a series of corruption charges in November. Netanyahu, Israel's longest serving prime minister, has denied any wrongdoing. ___ Associated Press writer Edith M. Lederer contributed to this report from the United Nations
  • A new Cabinet was announced in crisis-hit Lebanon late Tuesday, breaking a months-long impasse amid mass protests against the country's ruling elite and a crippling financial crisis, but demonstrations and violence continued. Hassan Diab, a 60-year-old former professor at the American University of Beirut, announced a Cabinet of 20 members — mostly specialists supported by the Shiite group Hezbollah and allied political parties. The new government, which comes three months after former Prime Minister Saad Hariri resigned, was rejected by protesters who have been calling for sweeping reforms and a government made up of independent technocrats that can deal with the country's economic and financial crisis, the worst since the 1975-90 civil war. Even before the Cabinet was announced, thousands of people poured into the streets, closing major roads in the capital of Beirut and other parts of the country in protest. The protesters complained that political groups still were involved in the naming of the new ministers, even if they are specialists and academics. Later, a group of protesters near Parliament threw stones, firecrackers and sticks at security forces, who responded with tear gas and pepper spray. “We want a government of experts ... who are they kidding?' said one protester, Fadi Zakour. “We have been protesting for 90 days and we are not happy to close roads,” he added. Diab saluted the protesters in the street and vowed to “work to fulfill your demands.” In a speech addressing the country following the government announcement, he added that his Cabinet is the first government in the history of Lebanon to be made up entirely of technocrats and insisted the 20 ministers are specialists who have no political loyalties and are not partisan. He appealed to citizens to help the government implement a “rescue program” and said this Cabinet has the “capability and qualifications, will and commitment” to carry it through. 'It’s time to get to work,” Diab said. U.N. Secretary-General Antonio Guterres welcomes the formation of a new government and looks forward to working with Diab and the incoming Council of Ministers, “including in support of Lebanon’s reform agenda and to address the pressing needs of its people,' U.N. spokesman Stephane Dujarric said. “The secretary-general reiterates the United Nations commitment to support Lebanon’s strengthening of its sovereignty, stability and political independence,' Dujarric said. For three months, the leaderless protests have been calling for a government made up of specialists that can work on dealing with the economic crisis. The protests have recently turned violent, with around 500 people injured in confrontations between protesters and security forces over the weekend. Although the government announced Tuesday is technically made up of specialists, the ministers were named by political parties in a process involving horse trading and bickering with little regard for the demands of protesters for a transparent process and independent candidates. Still, among the ministers named were accomplished academics and six women, including the minister of defense and deputy prime minister. The number is a record for Lebanon, with women now holding more than quarter of the Cabinet posts, including those of defense, justice, labor, youth and sports and the displaced. “The independence of justice will be among our top priorities and I will put all my efforts to move in this direction,” Justice Minister Marie-Claude Najm told local LBC TV. Analysts said the new government, being politically aligned with the Iranian-backed Hezbollah group, would likely have difficulty drumming up international and regional support needed to avoid economic collapse. “The Cabinet includes a fair number of capable technocrats, but it does not have any political independence to speak of,” wrote Paul Salem, president of the Middle East Institute. “This government is likely to be short lived, to preside over a steep decline in the economy, a dangerous swerve in the state's security relationships, and growing social and political unrest in the country,” he predicted. The heads of the main ministries include career diplomat Naseef Hitti for the Foreign Ministry. Economist Ghazi Wazni was named finance minister and former army Gen. Mohammed Fahmi was named minister of the interior. Zeina Akar was named minister of defense and deputy prime minister. Lebanon has been without a government since Hariri resigned Oct. 29, two weeks into the unprecedented nationwide protest movement. Diab dismissed accusations that his was a government made up of one political camp consisting of Hezbollah and its allies, insisting it was the government of all of Lebanon. He also said it was natural to consult with political parties on the names of ministers, because in the end they are the ones that will decide the vote of confidence in Parliament needed for the Cabinet. Diab said his first visit as prime minister will be to the Arab region, particularly to the Gulf Arab countries — a nod to Saudi Arabia, which was the main backer of former Prime Minister Saad Hariri. Backing from oil-rich Gulf countries is badly needed in Lebanon that has one of the highest debt ratios in the world. He said the government would get to work immediately and hold its first meeting Wednesday. Panic and anger have gripped the public as the Lebanese pound, pegged to the dollar for more than two decades, plummeted in value. It fell more than 60% in recent weeks on the black market. The economy has seen no growth and flows of foreign currency dried up in the already heavily indebted country that relies on imports for most basic goods. Shortly before the Cabinet was announced Tuesday night, the Syndicate of Money Changers in Lebanon issued a statement saying it had agreed to set the exchange rate at a maximum of 2,000 Lebanese pounds to the dollar, after it reached 2,500 pounds to the dollar last week. The official price still stands at 1,507 to the dollar.
  • A Honduran mother and her two children who had been hospitalized have been deported to Guatemala under a Trump administration policy of sending some people seeking asylum in the U.S. to third countries, advocates for the mother said Tuesday. Lawyers had asked a federal judge last week to stop the U.S. government from deporting the family. U.S. District Judge Micaela Alvarez did not rule on their request prior to Tuesday, the day the government had said it intended to remove the mother and her two children, ages 1 and 6, under a plan to send families to different countries so they can seek asylum elsewhere. The 1-year-old was diagnosed with the flu, while the 6-year-old had diarrhea and a fever, according to Dr. Amy Cohen, executive director of the immigrant advocacy group Every Last One. Cohen says the children fell sick while in U.S. Customs and Border Protection Custody after the family crossed the border without authorization in December. Both children were hospitalized over the weekend. In a court filing, government lawyers said the infant was being monitored to ensure she could be deported. Cohen said Tuesday that the children were released from the hospital Monday and a nurse had certified they could travel. According to Cohen, the family was flown to Guatemala and is now staying at a shelter in Guatemala City. They will have to request asylum in Guatemala or leave the country immediately. “The cruelty was beyond the pale — not only in the removal itself but also in the details of the treatment of this mother and her small children,' she said. CBP did not respond to several requests for comment on the case. President Donald Trump's administration reached a deal last year with Guatemala to take in asylum-seekers from Honduras and El Salvador. It has since said it will send Mexican asylum seekers to Guatemala as well. The U.S. has also announced similar agreements with Honduras and El Salvador. The Trump administration says the deals, known as asylum cooperative agreements, allow migrants from Central America to “seek protection within the region,' even though thousands of people flee El Salvador, Guatemala and Honduras annually due to endemic poverty, crime, and political or religious persecution. The American Civil Liberties Union and other legal groups have sued to try to prevent the agreements from being enforced. As of last week, at least 115 people originally from Honduras and El Salvador had been sent by the U.S. to Guatemala. ___ This story has been corrected to show that the 1-year-old child was diagnosed with the flu, not the 6-year-old. ___ Associated Press journalist Sonia Perez D. in Guatemala City contributed to this report.
  • Portuguese bank EuroBic said it will stop doing business with companies and people linked to its main shareholder Isabel dos Santos after an investigation accused the billionaire daughter of Angola’s former ruler of murky dealings. The International Consortium of Investigative Journalists this week accused Dos Santos, who is reputed to be Africa's richest woman, of using “unscrupulous deals” to build her fortune, estimated at $2 billion. She has denied any wrongdoing. The allegations were based on more than 715,000 confidential financial and business records provided by the Platform to Protect Whistleblowers in Africa, an advocacy group based in Paris, as well as hundreds of interviews. The cache of documents is known as Luanda Leaks, named for Angola's capital, Luanda. Dos Santos owns a 42.5% share of EuroBic, based in the Portuguese capital Lisbon, and is believed to have used it to move funds internationally. The bank has assets of around 7.8 billion euros ($8.6 billion). EuroBic's board said in a statement late Monday it is cutting ties with Dos Santos' companies and people close to her and is undertaking an immediate audit. It said the moves are due to “the public perception that this bank might not be complying with the rules because Isabel dos Santos is one of its principal shareholders.” Portugal’s central bank said it wants to review EuroBic’s financial operations, including its procedures to prevent money-laundering. The Bank of Portugal said it had been closely monitoring EuroBic's operations in recent years. Jose Eduardo dos Santos, Isabel's father, ruled oil- and diamond-rich Angola for 38 years until 2017. Human rights groups have long accused the former president of stealing vast amounts of state money during his rule. Before stepping down, he appointed his daughter head of the state oil company, Sonangol. Last December, a Luanda court froze Isabel dos Santos' major assets, which include banks and a telecom company. The government says it is trying to recover $1.1 billion it says the country is owed by Dos Santos, her husband and a close associate of the couple. Angola's minister for economic coordination, Manuel Jose Nunes Junior, said in a speech at Chatham House in London on Tuesday that his country is trying to crack down on corruption. “After a six-month grace period, when assets taken illegally from (Angola) could have been brought back without any penalties, the state is now (taking) all judicial, legal and diplomatic and other measures available to ensure the repatriation of those resources and ensure the recovery of assets to national soil,” he said. Dos Santos says the legal action against her is a “witch hunt” launched by officials who replaced her father. ___ Associated Press journalist Andrew Drake contributed to this report from London.
  • A retired Minnesota carpenter whom The Associated Press exposed as a former commander of a Nazi-led unit accused of war atrocities has died. Michael Karkoc, whose family maintained that he was never a Nazi or committed any war crimes, lived quietly in Minneapolis for decades until AP's review of U.S. and Ukrainian records in 2013 uncovered his past and prompted investigations in Germany and Poland. Karkoc died Dec. 14, according to cemetery and public records. He was 100. His son, Andriy Karkoc, hung up on an AP reporter without confirming his father's death. Officials at the Kozlak-Radulovich Funeral Chapel, which was listed on one website as having handled the funeral arrangements, declined to comment. But records at Hillside Cemetery in Minneapolis show he was quietly buried there Dec. 19, next to his wife, Nadia Karkoc, who died in 2018. And Minnesota Department of Health records show that a Michael Karkoc with the correct birthday died Dec. 14. The family and funeral home did not publish a public obituary. Karkoc's involvement in the war surfaced when a retiree who researched Nazi war crimes approached the AP after coming across Karkoc’s name. The AP investigation relied upon a broad range of interviews and documents, including Nazi military payroll information and company rosters, U.S. Army intelligence files, Ukrainian intelligence findings and Karkoc's self-published memoir. The records established that Karkoc was a commander in the SS-led Ukrainian Self Defense Legion, which attacked a Polish village where dozens of women and children were killed in 1944, then lied to American authorities to get into the U.S. after World War II. His family denied he was ever at the scene of the attack, though a second AP report uncovered testimony from a former soldier in Karkoc’s unit who said Karkoc ordered his men to attack the village, Chlaniow, in retaliation for the slaying of an SS major. Andriy Karkoc has said his father was never a Nazi and denied he was involved in any war crimes. He has also questioned the validity of AP’s sources and accused the AP of “defamatory and slanderous” allegations. The AP stories prompted Germany and Poland to investigate. German prosecutors announced in July 2015 that they had shelved their case because the then-96-year-old Karkoc wasn’t fit for trial. But Polish prosecutors announced in March 2017 that they would seek his arrest and extradition, saying his age was no obstacle in seeking to bring him to justice. Dr. Efraim Zuroff, the top Nazi hunter for the Simon Wiesenthal Center, said he was in no doubt that Karkoc should have been extradited and he called it unfortunate that Poland and the U.S. didn't move more aggressively to do so. “They seem to have handled this case with a lack of urgency,” Zuroff said in a telephone interview from Israel. “This is a typical case of a person who joined forces with Nazi Germany and was involved in crimes against innocent civilians, and he didn't deserve the privilege of living in a great democracy like the United States,” he said. A U.S. Department of Justice spokeswoman declined to comment on Karkoc's case, referring a reporter to the Polish government. An investigative file from the Ukrainian intelligence agency's archive revealed testimony from Pvt. Ivan Sharko, a Ukrainian soldier under Karkoc's command. Sharko testified in 1968 that the initial order to attack Chlaniow was given by another officer, but that Karkoc — who fought under the nom de guerre “Wolf” — told his unit to attack the village. 'The commander of our company, Wolf, also gave the command to cordon off the village and check all the houses, and to find and punish the partisans,” Sharko told authorities in Ukraine in 1967 and 1968, for an investigation they were conducting against the Self Defense Legion. Sharko, who died in the 1980s, also said the legionaries surrounded homes, set them on fire and shot anyone found inside homes or in the streets, according to the Russian-language investigative file. “How many people were killed in all, I don't know. I personally saw three corpses of peaceful inhabitants who had been killed,” Sharko was quoted as saying. Stephen Paskey, who led Nazi investigations for nine years as a prosecutor at the U.S. Department of Justice's Office of Special Investigations, said Sharko’s testimony is highly credible. He noted that Sharko didn’t appear to be in custody or under investigation when questioned, and many of his statements were confirmed by historical documents. Thomas Will, the deputy head of Germany’s special prosecutors' office that investigates Nazi crimes, concluded in 2013 that there was sufficient evidence that Karkoc was present. In 2017, Polish prosecutor Robert Janicki of the National Remembrance Institute, which investigates Nazi and Communist-era crimes against Poles, said years of investigation confirmed '100%' that he was a commander of the unit. Karkoc, an ethnic Ukrainian, was born in the city of Lutsk in 1919, according to details he provided to American officials. At the time, the area was being fought over by Ukraine, Poland and others; it ended up part of Poland until World War II. Several wartime Nazi documents note the same birth date, but say he was born in Horodok, a town in the same region. Karkoc didn’t tell U.S. authorities about his military service when he entered the country in 1949. But in a Ukrainian-language memoir published in 1995, Karkoc said he helped found the Ukrainian Self Defense Legion in 1943, in collaboration with the Nazis' feared SS intelligence agency, to fight on the side of Germany. He also wrote that he served as a company commander in the unit, which received orders directly from the SS, through the end of the war. The memoir is available at the U.S. Library of Congress and the British Library, and the AP located it online in an electronic Ukrainian library. Karkoc became a U.S. citizen in 1959. He lived for decades in a heavily Eastern European neighborhood of Minneapolis and was a longtime member of the St. Michael's and St. George's Ukrainian Orthodox Church. He worked as a carpenter, and was a member and a secretary in the local branch of the fraternal Ukrainian National Association. Antin Semeniuk, a friend of Karkoc in Minneapolis, said after the AP’s initial report that Karkoc told him he hadn't been a Nazi. Rather, Semeniuk said, Karkoc described himself as a Ukrainian patriot who wanted his country to be democratic and free of Nazi and Communist rule. ___ Associated Press writers David Rising in Berlin and Doug Glass in Minneapolis contributed to this story. Herschaft reported from New York.
  • Russian President Vladimir Putin formed his new Cabinet Tuesday, replacing many of its members but keeping his foreign, defense and finance ministers in place. The Cabinet shake-up comes as Putin has launched a sweeping constitutional reform that is widely seen as an attempt to secure his grip on power well after his current term ends in 2024. Immediately after announcing the proposed changes last week, Putin fired Prime Minister Dmitry Medvedev, who had the job for eight years, and named tax chief Mikhail Mishustin to succeed him. On Tuesday, Putin issued a decree outlining the structure of the new Cabinet and named its members. He appointed his economic adviser Andrei Belousov as first deputy prime minister and named eight deputy prime ministers, including some new names, such as Dmitry Chernyshenko who was the head of the organizing committee for the 2014 Sochi Olympics. Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov, Defense Minister Sergei Shoigu and Finance Minister Anton Siluanov have retained their jobs. Siluanov, however, was stripped of his additional role of first deputy prime minister, which he had in the old Cabinet. Other leading figures in the previous Cabinet, including Energy Minister Alexander Novak, Industry and Trade Minister Denis Manturov, Interior Minister Vladimir Kolokoltsev and Emergencies Minister Yevgeny Zinichev, also stayed. Medvedev's longtime associate, Alexander Konovalov, lost the job of justice minister, and Konstantin Chuikchenko, who was chief of staff in the old Cabinet, was moved to succeed him. Others who lost their jobs include Economics Minister Maxim Oreshkin, Sports Minister Pavel Kolobkov, Health Minister Veronika Skvortsova and Culture Minister Vladimir Medinsky. Kolobkov was replaced with Oleg Matytsin, who served as president of the International University Sports Federation, a body which often works closely with Olympic sports bodies. His connections could be important as Russia appeals against a ban on its name and flag at events like the Olympics over doping-related issues. Along with the Cabinet members, Putin also dismissed Prosecutor General Yuri Chaika and replaced him with Igor Krasnov. Putin met with members of the new Cabinet on Tuesday, hailing it as “well-balanced.' “The most important tasks are to increase the well-being of our people and to strengthen our state and its global standing,” he said. Putin, 67, has been in power for more than 20 years, longer than any other Russian or Soviet leader since Josef Stalin, who led from 1924 until his death in 1953. Under the current constitution, Putin must step down as president when his current term ends in 2024, and the set of constitutional changes he proposed last week are widely seen as part of his efforts to continue calling the shots. Putin's proposes that parliament will have a broader say over Cabinet appointments, but maintain and even strengthen the powers of the presidency. Putin also suggested that the constitution must specify the authority of the State Council, an advisory body that consists of regional governors and top federal officials. The Kremlin's constitutional bill submitted to parliament empowers the council to “determine the main directions of home and foreign policy,” its specific authority yet to be spelled out in a separate law. It remains unclear what position Putin may take to continue calling the shots, but observers say that the proposed changes could allow him to stay in charge by shifting into the position of the State Council's head. The lower house quickly scheduled the first of three required readings of the constitutional bill for Thursday. Putin said that the constitutional changes need to be approved by the entire nation, but it wasn't immediately clear how such a vote would be organized. Russia's leading opposition politician, Alexei Navalny, and other Kremlin foes have denounced Putin's move as an attempt to secure his rule for life, but the proposals didn't immediately trigger any major protest. The public response was muted by the vagueness of Putin's constitutional changes, and the dismissal of the unpopular Medvedev also helped divert attention from the suggested amendments. ___ James Ellingworth in Dusseldorf, Germany, contributed to this report.
  • NATO Secretary-General Jens Stoltenberg says the alliance must beef up its military training operation in Iraq to ensure that its members are not drawn back into combat there against Islamic State extremists. Stoltenberg has held talks in recent days with senior Iraqi and officials and King Abdullah of neighboring Jordan amid cautious optimism that NATO might be permitted to resume its training activities in Iraq in the near future. “We need to go heavy in and train. Build everything from the ministry of defense, institutions, command and control, to train forces. NATO can do that. We already do it, but we can scale up,” Stoltenberg told members of the European Parliament in Brussels on Tuesday. NATO agreed in 2018 to launch a training mission in Iraq involving around 500 troops with the aim of building up the country’s armed forces so they could better combat extremist groups like IS But the operation was put on hold after a U.S. missile strike at Baghdad airport killed Iran’s top general earlier this month and the Iraqi government demanded that foreign troops leave its territory. As tensions mounted, U.S. President Donald Trump insisted that NATO should do more in the region. However, there is little appetite among European allies and Canada to deploy troops, even though the United States is by far the biggest and most influential of the 29 NATO member countries. While acknowledging that he opposed the Iraq war as a Norwegian lawmaker in 2003, Stoltenberg said Tuesday he thought “the West left a bit too early” and that IS took advantage of the security vacuum by seizing vast swathes of territory in northern Iraq and Syria. “I strongly believe that if we don’t act now we may be forced back in combat,” he told the parliamentarians. “We must prevent that from happening again, and therefore we need to build some local (security) capacity so they prevent ISIS (Islamic State militants) from coming back.” “If we don’t do that we will have a big problem, for certain, and then we may end up 2-3 years down the road back in a big combat operation,” Stoltenberg said.

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  • Brock Vandagriffhas made a new decision. It should certainly read like a family-first decision. The 5-star QB de-committed from Oklahoma on the first day of 2020. He found a new home less than three weeks later. The rising senior in the 2021 class is able to still call it home both before and after his new college choice. It is 13.7 miles away from where he currently plays high school football. That will be 13 fewer hours and 900 miles closer than the Oklahoma program he had been previously committed to. The 6-foot-3, 205-pound junior from Prince Avenue Christian (Bogard, Ga.) is going to be a Bulldog. He announced that decision via his social media. Oklahoma was a great fit given his skill set. Now toss in Lincoln Riley and his reputation for building up No. 1 draft choices-slash-Heisman winners at that position. It made a lot of sense. Except when Thanksgiving and Christmas rolled around this past year. Those family ties tugged at his heart. He couldn't sleep and found himself praying it. 'My Dad and I we talked and stuff,' Brock Vandagriff said. 'We are kind of sacrificing the best fit for me just for some other things that are priorities now.' Vandagriff becomes the third member of the 2021 class in Athens and should certainly be seen as the cornerstone recruit for the class. That's a given with quarterbacks. Not just 5-star recruits. The 5-star QB ranks as the nation's No. 1 pro-style passer and the No. 9 overall prospect for that cycle on the 247Sports Composite rankings. He's the first 5-star QB to commit to Georgia since current Ohio State star Justin Fields did so in October of 2017. Why was it Georgia? 'I trust the coaches there and I trust them in the direction they are going and I want to be able to compete for national championships,' Brock Vandagriff said. When he made the decision to back off his commitment to Lincoln Riley at Oklahoma, it was clear that two things would be forthcoming: 1) He was going to make a move to be much closer to home: 2) He wasn't going to take a long time to figure out his next choice. pic.twitter.com/luGcDU7ZGI brock (@BrockVandagriff) January 1, 2020 The highly-competitive Prince Avenue Christian junior has never seemed to be the type that enjoyed the back-and-forth and courting of the recruiting process. When he opened his decision process back up, that just restarted all of those coaches reaching out once again. Vandagriff does plan to enroll early at Georgia in January of 2021. Brock Vandagriff: What he will now bring to UGA Let's tackle the biggest 'what this means' question first. Vandagriff will always be linked with Washington, D.C. area 5-star passer Caleb Williams in the 2021 cycle. Williams was heavy on Georgia over the last year, but LSU, Maryland, Oklahoma and Penn State are also strong contenders there for his eventual decision. The 6-foot-2, 207-pound junior is very much in the debate with Vandagriff for the nation's No. 1 overall QB prospect in 2021. He ranks as the nation's No.1 dual-threat passer and also the nation's No. 14 player at this time. This certainly appears to be an example of Georgia taking the commitment from a prospect who was ready to make his decision and dancing the jig around their facility in being fortunate to do so. He's rated as a pro-style QB, but his Hudl profile page lists a 4.65 time in the 40-yard dash. His 4.44 time in the pro agility drill should certainly be seen as a very good time for a quarterback prospect. Throw in his 37-inch vertical jump and he will certainly be an athlete for the Bulldogs at that position. Vandagriff's father, Greg, is the head football coach at Prince Avenue Christian in Bogart. That's about as close to UGA as any school can get. Especially one with his arm and the numbers he has put up playing Class A private football in Georgia. Toss in the fact that he is the son of a respected high school football coach in the state and it is clear that Vandagriff checks a lot of boxes in the ideal scouting makeup for a field leader. Vandagriff completed 151 of his 211 passes (72 percent) this past season for 2,471 yards in eight games. He tallied up a 31:3 touchdown-to-interception ratio. The junior also added 262 rushing yards and six touchdowns. Check out his junior highlight film below. He throws an easy ball that seems to carry downfield easily. Some of his best throws are made as he escapes the pocket on the run and delivers an accurate and powerful throw deep to receivers in stride. Brock Vandagriff: Getting to know Brock on DawgNation Brock Vandagriff breaks down his 'Junior Day' unofficial visit, plans quick return Vandagriff previews big UGA visit, opens up on his Oklahoma de-commitment Just how competitive is Brock Vandagriff? Check out this early DawgNation story The post BREAKING: 5-star junior QB Brock Vandagriff has a new college decision appeared first on DawgNation.
  • A teenager is arrested with a gun at North Hall High School. From the Hall County Sheriff’s Office… The Hall County Sheriff’s Office is investigating after a firearm was found in a 16-year-old male student’s vehicle at North Hall High School on Friday morning, Jan. 17.    At approximately 9 a.m., a school official noticed an improperly parked vehicle on campus. The School Resource Officer was notified after the official observed a handgun in the vehicle. The SRO responded and also saw the weapon in the car.    Deputies obtained a search warrant for the vehicle and located a rifle, a small quantity of marijuana, drug paraphernalia and a bottle of alcohol inside. The handgun initially spotted in the car turned out to be a BB pistol that looked like an actual firearm.    Sheriff’s Investigators obtained warrants for the arrest of the juvenile suspect on the charges of possession of a weapon at school, disrupting a public school and possession of marijuana. The 16year-old turned himself in to investigators early Friday evening and was transported to a youth detention center.    The case remains under investigation by the Hall County Sheriff’s Office.
  • The Georgia Bulldog basketball team, on the heels of a weekend loss at Mississippi State, will look for their first SEC road win of the season tonight in Lexington Kentucky. From Mike Mobley, UGA Sports Communications… Georgia will face Kentucky for the second time in two weeks on Tuesday. On Jan. 7 in a sold-out Stegeman Coliseum, the Bulldogs built a nine-point lead late in the first half and led for nearly 23 minutes of the game before the No. 14-ranked Wildcats rallied for a 78-69 victory.   Tuesday’s contest at Rupp Arena is the second half of a challenging back-to-back, Saturday-Tuesday road portion of the Bulldogs’ schedule. Georgia lost at Mississippi State on Saturday. Roughly 71 hours later, the Bulldogs will face the Wildcats, who were ranked No. 10 and No. 12 in the AP and coaches polls last week, respectively.    The outings versus MSU and UK are the fourth and fifth in Georgia’s grueling stretch to open SEC play. The Bulldogs will face six straight teams that earned NCAA Tournament bids last spring – Kentucky, Auburn, Tennessee, Mississippi State, Kentucky (again) and Ole Miss.   Georgia is 11-6 overall and 1-3 in SEC play. Last Wednesday, the Bulldogs matched their overall win total from a year ago with an impressive 80-63 victory over Tennessee.   Anthony Edwards, a pre- and mid-season All-American and leading National Freshman of the Year candidate, is the nation’s top-scoring freshman at 19.1 ppg. Edwards is the only freshman ranked among the top-50 scorers in the country at No. 47. Rayshaun Hammonds is the SEC’s fourth-leading rebounder (8.2 rpg) and also ranks No. 14 in scoring (13.8 ppg). 
  • Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs and Provost S. Jack Hu has appointed a 15-member committee to begin a national search for candidates for the position of vice provost for graduate education and dean of the Graduate School at the University of Georgia. The committee is chaired by Linda Kirk Fox, dean of the College of Family and Consumer Sciences, and it includes faculty, staff and student representation. The national search follows a review of the Graduate School conducted by Fox and several committee members. “Elevating the leadership of the Graduate School to the vice provost level at the University of Georgia signals the important role graduate and professional education plays in promoting research and innovation across all the disciplines,” Hu said. “I appreciate the dedication of the committee members and look forward to meeting with the finalists for this critical position.” Faculty, staff, students or community members who wish to nominate candidates for consideration are invited to contact Michael Luthi, director of the UGA Search Group, at luthi@uga.edu. In addition to Fox, the search committee members are: Michelle Ballif, professor and head of the department of English in the Franklin College of Arts and Sciences Cheri Bliss, director of graduate admissions and student services in the Graduate School Beate Brunow, director of academic partnerships and initiatives in the Division of Student Affairs Amy Ellis, professor of mathematics education in the College of Education Noel Fallows, Distinguished Research Professor of Spanish and associate provost for global engagement Georgia Harrison Hall, associate professor in the College of Environment and Design and chair of the policy and planning committee of the Graduate Council Shelley Hooks, associate professor of pharmaceutical and biomedical sciences in the College of Pharmacy and associate vice president in the Office of Research Lawrence Hornak, professor of electrical and computer engineering in the College of Engineering and associate vice president for integrative team initiatives in the Office of Research Angela Hsiung, doctoral student in the Warnell School of Forestry and Natural Resources Peter Jutras, professor and director of the Hugh Hodgson School of Music Erin Lipp, professor of environmental health science and associate dean for academic affairs in the College of Public Health Thomas Mote, Distinguished Research Professor of geography and associate dean in the Franklin College Mike Pfarrer, professor of management and associate dean for research and graduate programs in the Terry College of Business Franklin West, associate professor of animal and dairy science in the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences Ron Walcott, a professor of plant pathology in the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences who has served as associate dean of the Graduate School since 2017, is currently serving as interim dean of the Graduate School. The former dean of the Graduate School, Suzanne Barbour, was named dean of the Graduate School at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill.
  • Grab your hats, scarves, gloves and layer up. It’s going to be another cold day across north Georgia. Severe Weather Team 2 Meteorologist Brian Monahan has been tracking a colder start to your Tuesday morning than it was yesterday. Here’s what to know as you head out the door: Temperatures are in the teens and 20s now. Temperatures will continue to drop in most spots as we head toward sunrise Light wind out there this morning compared to yesterday, but Monahan says only a little wind has a big impact.

Bulldog News

  • Georgia basketball simply couldn't keep up with Kentucky in Rupp Arena on Tuesday night. The No. 15-ranked Wildcats (14-4, 5-1 SEC) took down the Bulldogs (11-7, 1-4) by an 89-79 count. It was UK's 14th straight win in the series, and their second this season. Kentucky guard Ashton Hagans, from Cartersville, Ga., led the Wildcats with 23 points, nine assists and five rebounds. Georgia junior Rayshaun Hammonds scored 16 points and pulled down 8 rebounds, giving Coach Tom Crean the type of road effort that was missing in a loss at Mississippi State on Saturday. UGA freshman Anthony Edwards, meanwhile, scored 16 points on 7-of-13 shooting. But it was a case of too little, too late from Edwards, who had just one rebound and turned the ball over five times. Edwards was heldscoreless in the first half as Kentucky staked out to a 41-35 lead at intermission. The Bulldogs had their moments, using a 9-0 run to claim a 29-28 lead with 5:34 left in the first half. Donnell Gresham Jr. sparked the burst with a 3-pointer and also capped it with a jumper that triggered a John Calipari timeout. Kentucky responded with a 7-0 run of its own the first 78 seconds out of the timeout to reclaim control of the game. Georgia held a surprising 19-17 advantage on the glass in the first half, but the smaller Bulldogs could not sustain that advantage. UK out-rebounded Georgia 21-12 in the second half, even as Edwards awoke from his first half slumber. Edwards finally scored two minutes into the second half after missing his first five shots. Edwards hit his next three shots, too, pulling the Bulldogs to 57-54 with 12:38 left. It was as close as Georgia got the rest of the night. Kentucky came back at the Bulldogs with a 12-2 run, and Georgia couldn't get closer than seven points the rest of the night The Wildcats wonthe first meeting between the teams by a 78-69 count in Athens, coming back from nine points down in front of a sold-out Stegeman Coliseum crowd in both team's SEC opener on Jan. 7. Georgia returns to action at 5:30 p.m. on Saturday at Stegeman Coliseum against Ole Miss. The Bulldogs are 9-1 on their home court this season. The post Georgia basketball falls at Kentucky, too little, too late from Anthony Edwards appeared first on DawgNation.
  • ATHENS Kirby Smart is typically pretty transparent, but the Georgia fifth-year head coach didn't let on the sort of overhaul or the extremes he was prepared to go to in order to improve the offense. 'We'll look at it,' Smart said on Dec. 18, asked about the Bulldogs' offensive philosophy. 'But we want to score points.' RELATED: Kirby Smart's amazing offseason of change at Georgia A month later, Georgia had landed the highest-rated (PFF) grad-transfer QB on the market, the OC from the NFL's most prolific pass game in 2018 and a quarterbacks coach Smart knew first hand from his Valdosta State days The Bulldogs still have work to do, and the Feb. 5 National Signing Day will certainly be worth tuning into. Georgia went 12-2 last season with a 5-1 mark vs. Top 25 teams and a third-straight SEC East Division title. But Smart, who insists on setting the bar at a championship level each fall, has continued to reach higher and push for more on his coaching staff and within his team. Complacency, Smart said, is the enemy of the team's aspirations and played a role last season. : When you're not hungry, you become average, and some of that, I think, has affected us in the past,' Smart said after the 26-14 Sugar Bowl win over Baylor. 'And we've got to find a way in this program to not let that creep in and keep that same hunger you have as a young player because we've had it happen to several guys that were really hungry, and then they become full.' Nobody in Butts-Mehre Heritage Hall will be getting too comfortable anytime soon. Indeed, incoming freshman QB Carson Beck is probably just now growing comfortable with the competition ahead of him on campus, and UGA has already added a 5-star in the 2021 class. Brock Vandagriff, a 5-star prospect from nearby Bogart who ranks as the No. 1 -ranked Pro Style quarterback in the 2021 class, made his verbal pledge on Tuesday. Mike Griffith and Connor Riley discuss the repercussions of Smart's latest moves and additions on Tuesday's 'On The Beat' show, and what it means for the program. Georgia football On The Beat, 1-21-20 More from DawgNation UGA adds offseason excitement, stars endorse new OC Todd Monken WATCH: 2021 commit Brock Vandagriff shares story with DawgNation Podcast: Brandon Adams shares his take on Brock Vandagriff addition Kirby Smart has turned Georgia offense upside down Social media reacts to addition of 5-star QB Brock Vandagriff Why Buster Faukner a perfect complement to Todd Monken The post WATCH: Georgia football early offseason breakdown, Brock Vanagriff addition, appeared first on DawgNation.
  • Brock Vandagriff is the newest 5-star commitment for the Georgia Bulldogs. The nation's No. 8 overall prospect (247Sports Composite ratings) chose Georgia earlier today. He was once committed to Oklahoma. Bet a lot of folks knew that. Maybe they also knew that he ran for 1,001 yards at a rate of 7.3 yards per carry as a high school sophomore. But what about his kickoffs? Or his big-time leg at punter? How 'bout the fact that he caught 34 passes during his freshman season at Prince Avenue Christian in nearby Bogart? Or that he threw his first high school pass off a jet sweep from the receiver spot? It was, of course, a touchdown. That's just the beginning of the information superhighway when it comes to all things Vandagriff. Check out the featured video above or the embedded version below for a breakdown on all things Vandagriff, including His favorite route to throw? How did Georgia keep the recruiting channels open after he committed to Oklahoma? His description of some real adversity he deal with during his junior year What was the reason he chose Georgia? What sort of connection his first name has to the Florida Gators? Did he really finish out a game last season with a broken fibula? Why did he choose to de-commit from Oklahoma? What sort of changes does he see in store for the offense at UGA? Brock Vandagriff: Getting to know Brock on DawgNation Prince Avenue Christian 5-star QB Brock Vandagriff commits to UGA Social media reacts strongly to Brock Vandagriff choosing Georgia DawgNation Daily: Breaking down what Vandagriff means to the Bulldogs Brock Vandagriff breaks down his 'Junior Day' unofficial visit, plans quick return Vandagriff previews big UGA visit, opens up on his Oklahoma de-commitment Just how competitive is Brock Vandagriff? Check out this early DawgNation story The post Brock Vandagriff: Watch the new 5-star Georgia commitment share his story appeared first on DawgNation.
  • ATHENS It's hard to say exactly what Georgia football will look like next season, but what a difference 6 1/2 weeks has already made. It has been an amazing and bold offensive transformation by Kirby Smart, a coach who can't seem to turn the pressure up on himself and his program enough with slogans like 'Do More' on the heels of 13 and 11-win seasons. So it was 6 1/2 weeks ago, LSU was on top of the world and the Bulldogs were headed toward the ranks of also-rans. The SEC Championship Game scoreboard said 37-10 by the end of the night, and Georgia looked every bit that far removed from title contention. The Bayou Bengals have since claimed the big prize, beating Clemson, securing a place in history with a record-breaking 15-0 season. But now it's Georgia, with a championship defense returning and an offensive overhaul, that looks like the better bet to party in 2020. The LSU staff has fragmented, the defensive coordinator and offensive architect gone. The record-breaking QB is on to the NFL, nine players turned pro early and are among 14 starters who are moving on. There's nowhere to go but down for Tigers coach Ed Orgeron. But Georgia is still, somehow, a program on the rise. Smart's defense, which allowed the fewest points and rushing yards per game in the nation last season, is bought in. Nine of 11 starters are back. Juniors Richard LeCounte, Eric Stokes, Monty Rice and Malik Herring passed up millions of dollars to return and chase the big prize. Many will wonder: Can the offense get the job done? We're not talking about Jake Fromm here, for a change. And Fromm going pro two weeks ago? Man, that's old news. There's so much more to talk about with this overhauled Georgia offense, and we're not even sure where to begin. Smart, the man who says 'if it ain't broke, find a way to make it better,' is on a roll. All this, just 6 1/2 weeks after the championship window appeared to be closing on Georgia football. Remember? Dropped passes, missed tackles, an ailing star running back and a depleted receiving corps. There was noargument about College Football Playoff worthiness. The Bulldogs limped to the finish line. RELATED: Kirby Smart praises LSU, explains Jake Fromm's struggles in defeat And yet, it was a noble regular-season finish. UGA won six straight to win a third-straight SEC East Division crown. But even in victory, right before our eyes, the quarterback was losing his confidence, the coaches were losing control of players, and the program was losing its pride. Another ho-hum Sugar Bowl trip was ahead. A handful of players quit the team early to train for the NFL draft. Others failed substance tests or flunked classes. No wonder Smart dodged the press. There was nothing remotely good or promising to say in those dark days of December. As Smart likes to say, the Bulldogs prefer to talk with their helmets, and any other major changes in direction would require an infusion of impact players and new coaches. Few could have anticipated just how aggressive Smart would be, but the team's showing in New Orleans provided a hint. The Bulldogs weren't ready to roll over and die. Baylor's Bears probably still don't know what hit them, or who hit them, with so many new faces and names filling the shoes of the 12 former starters who were missing in New Orleans. RELATED: Kirby Smart and Bulldogs score sweet statement win in Sugar Bowl As beleaguered and hard to watch as the 2019 Georgia football team was, it finished 5-1 versus Top 25 teams and with a No. 4 ranking. That was good enough for the record books, but not good enough for Smart, who has gone to work: The addition of grad-transfer Jamie Newman, a dual-threat QB with a big arm was captivating. The addition of Florida State grad-transfer TE Tre' Mckitty coupled with incoming freshman 5-star phenom Darnell Washington is fascinating. And now, in the past few days, Smart has turned his offensive staff upside down, landing former NFL OC Todd Monken and Southern Miss OC Buster Faulkner. There will be collateral damage, it's just a matter of who and when. Fans are scurrying to check Twitter profiles and message boards by the hour. Meanwhile, Smart is plotting his next move and another finishing kick on the fast-approaching February National Signing Day. A lot has changed in the past 6 1/2 weeks, and knowing Smart and the sense of urgency he has brought to Georgia football, there's no telling what could be next. Georgia football offseason Buster Faulkner the latest hire for Georgia offensive staff Kirby Smart lands Air Raid guru Todd Monken Todd Monken steps out of messy Cleveland and into ideal spot LSU DC Dave Aranda reveals UGA offensive game plan Mark Richt gives scout on FSU grad-transfer Tre' Mckitty UGA provides status update on James Coley Numbers game: Comparing Jamie Newman to Jake Fromm . The post Kirby Smart orchestrates amazing reinvigoration of Georgia football appeared first on DawgNation.
  • ATHENS You won't hear of too many college basketball coaches relishing an opportunity to play Kentucky in Rupp Arena, much less a team coming off a 32-point loss. But that's exactly where Georgia coach Tom Crean and his Bulldogs are right now, eager to prove themselves and make amends after an embarrassing 91-59 loss at Mississippi State on Saturday. 'I'm glad we're going on the road again right now, I really am,' Crean said on Monday, standing outside his office in Stegeman Coliseum as fans strolled by en route to a gymnastics meet. 'We've got to go test ourselves.' Georgia (11-6, 1-3 SEC) tips off at No. 15 Kentucky (13-4, 4-1) at 7 p.m. on Tuesday (TV: ESPN) looking to get back their pride. It wasn't just that UGA lost to Mississippi State by such a lopsided margin, it was how they lost. Georgia was outrebounded 40-22, it was beat in transition and out-physicaled and out-toughed at each turn. It was the first time this year's edition of Georgia Bulldogs, featuring projected NBA lottery pick Anthony Edwards and a recharged Rayshaun Hammonds, looked like the sad sack group of a year ago. RELATED: Crean calls out Bulldogs for pitiful' effort Crean, as upset as he was about the Saturday night defeat, clearly believes in this year's team and loves their disposition. 'I'm glad we get to go test ourselves right now, because we've got to bounce back and bounce back quickly from it,' said Crean, who won two outright Big Ten championships while at Indiana. 'We practiced well, we practiced confidently we have very hard workers, we have guys that are diligent and want to be good. It wasn't like we didn't go do it a couple of weeks ago, and we have to remember that, as well.' Indeed, Georgia's 65-62 road win at then-No. 9 Memphis on Jan. 4 was a victory to build on. It was only the second time in UGA basketball history the program won a non-conference road game against a Top 25 team. Beating Tennessee 80-63 last Wednesday after the Vols beat the Bulldogs by 46 a year ago was another program win. While Georgia might not beat Kentucky on Tuesday the odds say it probably won't Crean sounds confident his players will compete. This, even though they were blown out at Auburn (82-60) and Mississippi State (91-59) in their first two SEC road games. 'We have to understand that whether we're at home or whether we're on the road, we have to play a physical style of game when it comes to getting into people blocking out,' Crean said. 'Or, going for 50-50 balls, getting back in transition defense, being more active with your hands, all of those kind of things.' Georgia's next home game is at 5:30 p.m. on Saturday against Ole Miss. Georgia coach Tom Crean DawgNation Georgia Basketball Mississippi State wins battle of Bulldogs in Starkville, decisively Anthony Edwards puts the squeeze on Tennessee in blowout win Georgia falls in first SEC road game of season at Auburn Anthony Edwards says UGA didn't play tough enough vs. Kentucky Georgia basketball delivers signature Top 10 win at Memphs Freshman Anthony Edwards discloses injury, status Sahvir Wheeler on clutch game-winner, 'been there a ton of times' Tom Izzo on Georgia: 'That was an incredible comeback' Anthony Edwards lights up Michigan State for 37 in 93-85 loss Rayshaun Hammonds wrecks Georgia Tech Anthony Edwards draws standing ovation in opener Georgia freshman already making basketball history The post WATCH: Georgia basketball coach Tom Crean relishes Rupp road trip, opportunity at Kentucky appeared first on DawgNation.