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World News Headlines

    Serbia's pro-Russia defense minister denounced the U.S. ambassador to Serbia and suggested he should be thrown out of the country Monday for calling the former Serbian province of Kosovo a sovereign state. Defense Minister Aleksandar Vulin said in a statement that U.S. Ambassador Kyle Scott 'has forgotten that Serbia is not a colony and that he cannot trample on its dignity.' Earlier Monday, Scott said in response to a Serbian journalist's question at an economic meeting, 'We recognize Kosovo as an independent and sovereign country.' Vulin said that if Scott had made the statement in front of Serbian President Aleksandar Vucic, 'he would have been kicked head first' from the government building in Belgrade. 'Then, Serbia would be able to see who cares about Serbia and who cares about his lower back,' Vulin, who is known for outlandish remarks, said. Kosovo declared independence from Serbia in 2008. Serbia and its allies Russia and China don't recognize the declaration, but most Western countries do. NATO has led a peacekeeping force in Kosovo since the alliance intervened to stop a Serb crackdown on Kosovo Albanian separatists in 1999. Serbia is seeking membership in the European Union, but lately has drifted toward Russia.
  • Islamic State-linked extremists in Nigeria have killed another abducted health worker despite an urgent plea from the International Committee of the Red Cross to spare her life, Nigeria's government said late Monday. The government identified her as Hauwa Mohammed Liman, who had been working in a hospital supported by the ICRC. Her death comes a month after a third abducted health worker was killed by the same group, the Islamic State West Africa Province. It has become the largest IS-linked extremist group in Africa. All three were seized in March in the northeastern community of Rann, where thousands have sought shelter from the extremist threat that includes the Nigeria-based Boko Haram insurgency. There was no immediate comment from the ICRC, which on Sunday said 'we urge you for mercy' and noted that a 24-hour deadline was counting down. The global aid organization urged Nigerian authorities and others who might have influence to help. The statement by Nigeria's information minister on Monday said the government was 'shocked and saddened' and would continue to work for the safe release of other captives. 'The federal government did all within its powers to save her life,' the statement said, adding that the government had kept the 'line of negotiations' open since the abductions. The killing in September of Saifura Hussaini Ahmed Khorsa led to outrage. She was abducted along with Liman and Alice Loksha, a nurse who worked at a center supported by the U.N. children's agency. The ICRC, which does not pay ransoms, earlier said it had not been directly involved in discussions on the extremists' demands. The same group of extremists also is holding Leah Sharibu, a student seized in a mass abduction in February. She remains captive while more than 100 of her fellow students were released because she is Christian. Her mother in recent weeks has said her life was in danger. Nigerian President Muhammadu Buhari, who declared that defeating extremism was a top priority when he took power in 2015, in recent days sent three Cabinet ministers to meet with the families of Sharibu and the abducted health workers, his office said. Buhari last month called the killing of Khorsa 'an act of extreme barbarism; utterly reprehensible and inhuman.' ___ Follow Africa news at https://twitter.com/AP_Africa
  • Gambia on Monday launched a truth, reconciliation and reparations commission to lay bare abuses committed under the 22-year rule of former leader Yahya Jammeh, with President Adama Barrow declaring the country's 'dark days' are over. The long-awaited commission is meant to help heal the tiny West African nation after years of extrajudicial killings, torture and abuses in phony 'HIV treatment' centers. It also is expected to lay the groundwork for possible prosecution of Jammeh, who flew into exile in Equatorial Guinea in early 2017, and others. The new government under Barrow, who handed Jammeh a surprise election defeat at the head of an opposition coalition, has vowed to deliver justice to victims. Speaking to a crowd that came to witness what many have called a historic moment, Barrow called on Gambians to stand together and say never again would a few people subject the country to oppression. The president stressed the government's commitment to put victims at the center of the process: 'It is for this reason that we included reparations.' The Gambian-born prosecutor of the International Criminal Court, Fatou Bensouda, said the commission will help the country write a new chapter and that in order to move forward 'it must reckon with its past.' It is not an exercise in settling political scores, she said. The 11-member commission will investigate human rights abuses committed between July 1994 and January 2017. It has the power to subpoena alleged perpetrators. Already, the new freedoms in Gambia have inspired growing demands for justice. 'We know so much more today about the crimes of Jammeh's government than we did a year ago, and when the truth commission is finished hearing from all the victims we should have a complete picture,' said Reed Brody of Human Rights Watch, who has been working with victims. Justice Minister Abubacarr Tambadou called Jammeh's departure a turning point for the country but said the former leader left behind a 'deeply polarized society based on ethnic and political considerations, ethnic hatred manifested through hateful propaganda targeting ethnic communities.' Justice will be done but there will be no witch hunt, the minister said. The head of the Gambia Center for Victims of Human Rights Violations, Sheriff Kijera, said the organization has documented hundreds of cases. He deplored the fact that some alleged perpetrators and enablers of the Jammeh era continue to hold 'lucrative positions' in the government and security forces. 'Many victims suffered terrible human rights violations for many years,' he said. 'Some have high expectations of what the TRRC will be doing for them.' ___ Follow Africa news at https://twitter.com/AP_Africa
  • The Russian Orthodox Church decided Monday to sever ties with the leader of the worldwide Orthodox community after his decision to grant Ukrainian clerics independence from the Moscow Patriarchate. Metropolitan Hilarion said the Russian church's Holy Synod resolved to '''break the Eucharistic communion' with the Istanbul-based Ecumenical Patriarchate of Constantinople. Under the leadership of Ecumenical Patriarch Bartholomew I, the patriarchate last week removed its condemnation of leaders of schismatic Orthodox churches in Ukraine. The decision marked a step toward establishing an ecclesiastically independent - or autocephalous - church in Ukraine. The Orthodox Church in Ukraine has been under the jurisdiction of the Russian Orthodox Church since the late 1600s. Calls for the Ukrainian church's independence have increased since Moscow's 2014 annexation of the Crimean Peninsula and its support of separatist rebels fighting in eastern Ukraine. Ukraine currently has three Orthodox communities - one answering to the Russian Orthodox Church and two schismatic churches. Metropolitan Hilarion, who heads the Russian Orthodox Church's foreign relations department, said after the Holy Synod's meeting in Minsk, Belarus on Monday that rupturing ties with the Ecumenical Patriarchate was a response to its 'lawless and canonically void moves.' 'The Russian Orthodox Church doesn't recognize those decisions and won't fulfill them,' he said. 'The church that acknowledged the schismatics has excluded itself from the canonical field of the Orthodoxy.' Ukrainian President Petro Poroshenko, who is running for re-election in a March vote, has pushed Bartholomew to grant independence to the Ukrainian church. Ukrainian Orthodox Church Archbishop Yevstratiy denounced the Holy Synod's decision to sever ties with the Orthodox Church leader regarded as a 'first among equals' as a move toward 'self-isolation.' The Russian church voiced concern that the Istanbul-based patriarchate's action would deepen the religious rift in Ukraine and could spur the schismatic branches to try to take over church buildings. The Russian Orthodox Church expects Poroshenko to make good on his pledge that the Ukrainian government would ensure respect for the choices of those who want to retain unity with the Russian church. __ Yuras Karmanau in Minsk, Belarus contributed to this report.
  • Ecuador has formally ordered Julian Assange to steer clear of topics that could harm its diplomatic interests if he wants to be reconnected to the internet, according to a memo published in a local media outlet Monday. The nine-page memo published by Ecuadorean website Codigo Vidrio said Assange is prohibited from 'interfering in the internal affairs of other states' or from activities 'that could prejudice Ecuador's good relations with other states.' There was no indication Assange signed onto the memo, which governs the WikiLeaks founder's access to the Wi-Fi network of the Ecuadoran Embassy in London, where he lived since seeking asylum there in 2012. The Associated Press could not immediately authenticate the document. But Codigo Vidrio has a track record of publishing inside material from the London embassy, and the restrictions detailed in the memo echo the conditions Ecuadorean President Lenin Moreno recently described in an interview with AP . Messages left with Ecuador's Foreign Ministry and WikiLeaks representatives were not immediately returned. Tension has been long building between Assange and his hosts, particularly after the Australian ex-hacker began cheering on Catalonian secessionists in Spain last year. In March, Ecuador announced it was restricting Assange's access to the internet. On Sunday, WikiLeaks said Assange would be reconnected to the internet, but it's not clear whether the move was contingent on him agreeing to Ecuador's conditions. The memo mostly governs security and communication issues, but offers hints of other Assange issues at the embassy. For example, the document ordered Assange to keep the bathroom clean and warned that his pet cat would be confiscated and taken to an animal shelter if he did not look after it. Assange took refuge at Ecuadorean Embassy to avoid extradition to Sweden, where he faced sex crimes allegations.
  • German prosecutors said Monday that law enforcement officials have conducted searches at automaker Opel as part of an investigation into suspected manipulation of diesel emissions. Meanwhile, the country's transportation ministry said it intended to order 100,000 Opel vehicles recalled, saying Opel had dragged out voluntary fixes. The dpa news agency reported that investors went to company facilities Monday in the cities of Russelsheim and Kaiserslautern. Nadja Niesen, a spokeswoman for prosecutors in Frankfurt, was cited by dpa as saying investigators suspect Opel may have used software to turn off emissions controls at certain engine speeds and temperatures. Opel, which is part of France's PSA Group after being sold by General Motors last year, confirmed the searches but declined to offer details. Diesel came under scrutiny in Europe after Volkswagen admitted to illegally manipulating software to cheat on U.S. emissions test. Cars from other automakers were subsequently found to turn off controls at certain temperatures, ostensibly to protect the engine but also increasing emissions. Germany's transportation ministry said in a statement that it had found four instances in which emissions were turned off in the affected models, and that Opel had dragged out a voluntary recall to fix them to the extent that only 70 percent of those vehicles have had their software adjusted to lower emissions. The ministry said that after a fifth instance was found it started hearings against the company to require it to recall certain Cascada, Insignia and Zafira models. It said that 'this hearing was also dragged out by Opel with ever new technical arguments.' Opel said in a statement that 'the company is cooperating completely with the authorities. The company emphasizes that its vehicles comply with the applicable regulations.
  • Stephen Hawking spoke from beyond the grave Monday to warn the world that science and education are under threat around the world. The words of the scientist, who died in March at 76, were broadcast at a London launch event for his final book 'Brief Answers To The Big Questions.' Hawking warned that education and science are 'in danger now more than ever before.' He cited the election of U.S. President Donald Trump and Britain's 2016 vote to leave the European Union as part of 'a global revolt against experts and that includes scientists.' Acknowledging that science had yet to overcome major challenges for the world — including climate change, overpopulation, species extinction, deforestation and the degradation of the oceans — the physicist still urged young people 'to look up at the stars and not down at your feet.' 'Try to make sense of what you see, and wonder about what makes the universe exist,' he said. 'It matters that you don't give up. Unleash your imagination. Shape the future.' Hawking lived for more than five decades with motor neuron disease that left him paralyzed, communicating through a voice-generating computer. In June, his ashes were buried in Westminster Abbey, between the graves of Charles Darwin and Isaac Newton. Hawking's daughter Lucy, who attended the book launch, said hearing her father's unmistakable voice had been 'very emotional.' 'I turned away, because I had tears forming in my eyes,' she said. 'I feel sometimes like he's still here because we talk about him and we hear his voice and we see images of him, and then we have the reminder that he's left us.
  • Attorney General Jeff Sessions created a new task force aimed at zeroing in on the three of the world's most notorious drug cartels and the brutal MS-13 street gang, already considered a top priority for federal law enforcement.  Speaking to a group of federal prosecutors on Monday, Sessions designated five groups as top transnational organized crime threats and said the new task force will 'develop a plan to take each of these groups off of our streets for good.' Sessions, who been on the receiving end of relentless verbal jabs from President Donald Trump and may be in the final stretches of his tenure, was speaking directly to one of the president's prime targets amid the administration's broader crackdown on immigration: MS-13. Trump has said MS-13 gang members from the stronghold of El Salvador are coming to the U.S. both illegally and as unaccompanied minors to wreak havoc. He has held up the gang as a reason for stricter immigration policies meted out by Sessions and others. 'With more than 10,000 members in the United States, this gang is the most violent gang in America today,' Sessions said. Last year, Sessions directed officials to pursue all possible charges against MS-13 members, including racketeering, gun and tax law violations. He also designated the gang as a 'priority' to a multiagency task force that has historically focused on drug trafficking and money laundering, which he called a 'powerful weapon to use against this vicious gang.' The gang, also known as La Mara Salvatrucha, is generally known for extortion and violence rather than distributing and selling narcotics. MS-13 members are suspected of committing several high-profile killings in New York, Maryland and Virginia. On New York's Long Island, where more than two dozen people are believed to have been killed by the gang since 2016, officials have arrested hundreds of MS-13 members, Sessions said. The task force announced Monday will allow federal prosecutors to better target priority organizations and make prosecutions 'more effective,' the attorney general said. As part of initiative, prosecutors will lead specialized subcommittees focusing on each of the organizations and will report back to Sessions within 90 days on the best ways to prosecute the groups, he said. The groups include the Sinaloa Cartel, Cartel de Jalisco Nueva Generacion and Clan del Golfo, as well as Lebanese Hezbollah, which the U.S. considers a terrorist organization. The subcommittees investigating the drug cartels are led by prosecutors who have charged drug kingpins and led cases that resulted in the seizures of millions of dollars. The group focusing on Hezbollah will include prosecutors who specialize in narcotics trafficking, terrorism and organized crime and will also investigate anyone providing support for the organization, Sessions said. Formed by the Iranian Revolutionary Guard in 1982 to fight Israel's invasion of Beirut, Hezbollah has morphed into a powerful political player in Lebanon, running its own media and communication channels and providing government-like services to followers in its strongholds. The U.S. considers Hezbollah a terrorist organization and has previously hit the group with sanctions. ___ Follow Michael Balsamo on Twitter at www.twitter.com/MikeBalsamo1 .
  • South Korean President Moon Jae-in has met with French President Emmanuel Macron to discuss inter-Korean talks and bilateral issues. Moon, on a state visit to France, said he considers France, a permanent member of the U.N. Security Council, as a key partner in efforts toward peace with North Korea. Moon, who is on a European trip which also includes Italy, Belgium and Denmark, aims to seek support for inter-Korean rapprochement amid widespread international skepticism that North Korea will disarm. Macron said France is looking for a complete, verifiable and irreversible denuclearization of the Korean peninsula and is not going to ease sanctions on North Korea or establish diplomatic relations with North Korea at this stage. 'It's good to keep leverage to ensure there are changes,' Macron said. Both leaders pledged to enhance economic and cultural cooperation between their countries in a joint news conference Monday in Paris. North and South Korea continued their push for peace Monday with high-level talks that resulted in a host of agreements, including a plan by the rivals for a groundbreaking ceremony this year on an ambitious project to connect their railways and roads.
  • Two Turkish journalists have been charged with insulting the Turkish nation and institutions for suggesting that a Turkish court may not have acted independently when ruling in the case against an American pastor. Duygu Guvenc and Alican Uludag, from the opposition Cumhuriyet newspaper, face maximum two years in prison for articles published in July after U.S. pastor Andrew Brunson, who was at the center of a Turkish-U.S. diplomatic dispute, was released to house arrest after almost two years in jail. The two journalists reject the charge. Guvenc says Monday 'we used our constitutional right to criticize decisions as journalists.' The pastor, who was accused of terror-related charges, was convicted Friday yet released from custody for time served. He has returned to the United States. The journalists' trial is set for Dec. 20.

Local News

  • The Atlanta Braves announced Monday that the organization has agreed to terms on a two-year contract for manager Brian Snitker. The contract does include a third-year club option for 2021.  Snitker took over as manager for the Braves in 2016 and led the team to their first National League East Division title in five years this season.  Here is the full statement from the Atlanta Braves: The Atlanta #Braves and manager Brian Snitker have agreed to terms on a two-year contract with a club option for the 2021 season: pic.twitter.com/CsReyEyU9x — Atlanta Braves (@Braves) October 15, 2018 TRENDING STORIES: Georgia already topping list for flu activity in the nation President Trump to view storm damage in Georgia Atlanta police seize drugs and guns from a popular food mart Snitker has been with the Braves organization for 43 seasons, including three seasons as manager for Triple-A club in Gwinnett.  The National League 'Manager of the Year' candidate, who turns 63 on Wednesday, owns a 221-227 (.493) record in his two-plus seasons. Information from our partners at The Atlanta Journal-Constitution was used in this report.
  • Jackson County Commissioners meet tonight at the courthouse in Jefferson: their session is underway at 6 o’clock this evening. Commissioners will consider a proposal from developers who wants 2 million square feet of warehouse space on 357 acres off Josh Pirkle Road in Jackson County. It’s a project opposed by the Jackson County Planning Commission. There is an afternoon meeting of the Oconee County Industrial Development Authority, 4 o’clock at Oconee County Chamber of Commerce offices in Watkinsville.  Tonight’s meeting of the Oconee County Planning Commission is set for 7 o’clock at the courthouse in Watkinsville.  Madison County’s Industrial Development Authority meets at 6 o’clock this evening at the Historic Courthouse in Danielsville.
  • Athens-Clarke County Police Lieutenant Jeff Clark begins his new assignment as the Department’s Deputy Police Chief. Clark is a 20-year veteran of local law enforcement. He takes over for Justin Gregory, who resigned earlier this month. The naming of a new deputy chief comes from interim Chief Mike Hunsinger, who took over after the resignation of former Chief Scott Freeman, who was asked to resign by Athens-Clarke County Manger Blaine Williams.  From the Athens-Clarke Co PD... ACCPD Interim Chief Mike Hunsinger has appointed Lt. Jeff Clark, a 20-year veteran with the ACCPD, to Interim Deputy Chief. Interim Deputy Chief Clark rose through the ranks from Patrolman to Detective, serving as a Sergeant and Lieutenant in both the Patrol and Criminal Investigation Bureaus. Clark is a veteran of the U.S. Army, a graduate of the Georgia Association of Chiefs of Police Command College and a graduate of Columbus State College with a Master of Public Administration degree. “Interim Deputy Chief Clark is highly regarded in the department and has the education and experience needed for this position. I look forward to working with him in his new role,” stated Interim Chief Hunsinger. As Interim Deputy Chief, Clark will oversee the day-to-day operation of all police functions. Outside his work with the ACCPD, Clark volunteers with a variety of local organizations. “My favorite part of law enforcement is engaging with the officers and citizens to address public safety concerns. I look forward to working with the employees of the ACCPD and the citizens of Athens-Clarke County,' said Clark.
  • The GBI continues its investigation into a deadly officer involved shooting in Hall County: a man was killed by Hall County deputies after a 7-hour SWAT standoff at a home in East Hall. Those deputies say he fired at them from the front door of the house on Truelove Road. James Manus was 41 years old. No law enforcement officers were injured. From the Hall County Sheriff’s Office… On October 13, 2018, just before 5 PM, Sheriff’s Deputies responded to 3185 Truelove Road, in East Hall County, regarding a man with a gun.    Upon arrival, they learned that the resident of that address had pointed at handgun at neighbors, and when the Deputies attempted to make contact with him, he barricaded himself inside the residence and refused all attempts at communication. SWAT team members and Investigators arrived on the scene a short time later, and an extended effort to establish contact and negotiate with the suspect was undertaken.    At approximately 11 PM, the suspect began shooting at Deputies from within the residence. Just after midnight, he appeared in the front doorway and again fired at Deputies, who returned fire, fatally striking the suspect.    No Deputies or bystanders were injured during the incident.    As is customary in officer-involved shooting cases, the Georgia Bureau of Investigation was called to the scene and has assumed the investigation.    No further information will be released at this time, pending the GBI investigation. 
  • There has been a second deadly vehicle vs motorcycle accident in less than a week in Athens: last week, 27 year-old Douglas Nash was killed when his motorcycle collided with a car on Barnett Shoals Drive; last night, 43 year-old Antion Brown of Athens was killed in a wreck on Spring Valley Road. The Georgia State Patrol is investigating the crash, which happened at Spring Valley and Indian Hills Drive.  A 29 year-old man is dead, the victim of a car accident in Hall County. Gainesville Police say Thomas Garrett lost control of his car, swerving off a roadway and overturning twice. 

Bulldog News

  • ATHENS — College football games between relatively evenly matched teams can often come down to a handful of plays, with momentum playing a large role in the outcome. The LSU-Georgia game on Saturday in Tiger Stadium was no different, the Bayou Bengals prevailing 36-16 over the previously undefeated Bulldogs. Both teams had their strengths, but they had also shown their deficiencies leading up to a high-profile clash that drew the largest college football game rating last weekend. LSU did a better job of exposing the Bulldogs’ weaknesses than Georgia did the Tigers. Here are the three key moments that played a large role in determining the outcome of Saturday’s game 1. Georgia’s failed fake field goal Perhaps the biggest play of the game in hindsight, as Georgia had ran the ball nine straight times for 60 yards before two incomplete passes put the Bulldogs in position for a field goal attempt. Kirby Smart said the staff knew before the game they were going to run a fake if they saw an LSU alignment they felt they could take advantage of, and the Tigers presented that look on Georgia’s second drive. “They were like 15 of 17 (88 percent) with a look that it would work on,” Smart said, explaining why the Bulldogs passed on a 31-yard field goal attempt at the 3:28 mark of the opening quarter, down 3-0. “We wanted to be aggressive.” LSU coach Ed Orgeron said Georgia’s fake field goal did indeed surprise him. “ It surprised me, 10 yards to go, it surprised me,” he said. “But we always have a guy for the fake. We have eyes. And when you’re playing for the field goal block, you have to have your eyes on your man, not on the field goal kicker. Tremendous discipline.” 2. LSU’s 47-yard run on third-and-1 Tiger Stadium erupted again on the final play of the first quarter on the ensuing drive after Georgia had lost its initial momentum with the fruitless fake field goal. The game within the game was LSU’s offensive line vs. the Georgia front seven, and this was the first short-yardage battle of the game, third-and-1 at the Tigers’ 46. RELATED: Kirby Smart challenges defense to ‘knuckle up’ at LSU The Bulldogs were not gap sound, and LSU’s Clyde Edwards-Helaire rushed 47 yards to the UGA 7 to set up a TD that made it 10-0. It was only the second run of longer than 20 yards Georgia had given up all season. The play gave the Tigers the confidence they needed to go for it on four other fourth-and-1 situations against the Bulldogs, all of which they converted in back-breaking fashion. “At the end of the day,” Smart said, “you don’t win the line of scrimmage in this league, you won’t win the football game.” Orgeron, meanwhile, said LSU was still smarting from its 27-19 loss at Florida the week before. The Tigers coach was intent to make amends after electing to kick a field goal from the Gators’ 15-yard line on a fourth-and-inches situation in the second quarter with that game tied at 7-7.. “We were throwing out the kitchen sink, man, everything we had, we did,” Orgeron said, asked about the decision to go for it on four fourth downs against Georgia. “All week, we talked about being aggressive. I was a little pissed at myself for not going for it against Florida down there fourth and half an inch.” Third-and-6 sack in fourth quarter Georgia trailed 19-9 when it took over at the LSU 38-yard line with 14:39 remaining, Mecole Hardman having broken loose on a 27-yard punt return after the Bulldogs’ defense turned the momentum by forcing LSU to go three-and-out. RELATED: LSU defensive wizard outschemed Georgia football A jet sweep call for Hardman was stopped for no gain, and then Justin Fields was brought in to handoff to third-string tailback Brian Herrien for 4 yards, bringing up the third-and-6 at the 34. Georgia was still within Rodrigo Blankenship’s field goal range when Jake Fromm took the snap, but the veteran QB failed to make a play — instead taking a 9-yard sack that took the Bulldogs out of field goal range. “Some of those you’ve got to escape and get rid of the ball, there’s a lot of pressures they run that are hard to pick up, and I was very concerned with that coming into the game,” Smart said. “But I didn’t think it was the protection as much as it was making decisions quicker, getting rid of the ball quicker, and at the end of the day, don’t be in third-and-long.”   LSU, its crowd still roaring from the sack, responded with a six-play, 86-yard drive to go up 26-9. Georgia-LSU football DawgNation Georgia-LSU top-rated television game, Atlanta market shines Kirby Smart defends Jake Fromm at LSU Georgia football saw warning signs, couldn’t dodge Tigers’ trap Why didn’t Georgia use Justin Fields more? Report card: Bulldogs bomb midterm Georgia football stock report, LSU cashes in on Dawgs mistakes Instant analysis: Georgia melts in Louisiana heat against LSU Tigers came at Georgia for four downs on each series RECAP: Scoring, injuries, news from Georgia’s 36-16 loss to LSU Georgia rushing attack goes AWOL in battle at LSU         The post Georgia-LSU rewind: 3 momentum-changing plays in Bulldogs’ 36-16 loss appeared first on DawgNation.
  • The Atlanta Braves announced Monday that the organization has agreed to terms on a two-year contract for manager Brian Snitker. The contract does include a third-year club option for 2021.  Snitker took over as manager for the Braves in 2016 and led the team to their first National League East Division title in five years this season.  Here is the full statement from the Atlanta Braves: The Atlanta #Braves and manager Brian Snitker have agreed to terms on a two-year contract with a club option for the 2021 season: pic.twitter.com/CsReyEyU9x — Atlanta Braves (@Braves) October 15, 2018 TRENDING STORIES: Georgia already topping list for flu activity in the nation President Trump to view storm damage in Georgia Atlanta police seize drugs and guns from a popular food mart Snitker has been with the Braves organization for 43 seasons, including three seasons as manager for Triple-A club in Gwinnett.  The National League 'Manager of the Year' candidate, who turns 63 on Wednesday, owns a 221-227 (.493) record in his two-plus seasons. Information from our partners at The Atlanta Journal-Constitution was used in this report.
  • BATON ROUGE, La. — Dave Aranda is the highest paid coordinator in college football, and Saturday afternoon the LSU   defensive wizard earned his $2.5 million annual salary by throttling Georgia’s multifaceted offense. Tigers coach Ed Orgeron said in the days leading up to LSU’s 36-16 win over the Bulldogs that it would be a chess match, and the coaching moves from both staffs were on display. Georgia marched 60 yards on nine consecutive run plays on its second offensive series, displaying a dominant run game that seemed to bode well for the afternoon before an ill-fated fake field goal attempt changed the momentum. The Bulldogs managed just 17 yards on their next seven carries, LSU forcing three consecutive three-and-out series in pulling away to a 16-0 halftime lead. WATCH: LSU coach Ed Orgeron says physical football in Tigers’ DNA “You know they started running the football on us in the first quarter, (and) Dave (Aranda) made some adjustments,” Orgeron said. “Dave did a great job. We mixed up the personnel groupings that we use. We gave them some stuff that they didn’t see. Obviously, everything was built on stopping the run and the deep pass, and we did it. “We were playing one certain defense, and it wasn’t working. And we changed to play another one, and it worked.” Georgia, with its two-headed monster at quarterback, it’s four-man tailback platoon and double-digit receiver rotation, could not strike the right combination. The same versatility that has made the Bulldogs a tough matchup for an opponent worked against coach Kirby Smart — Georgia had no offensive identity to lean on when times got tough. “We were in four-open sets and we were running the ball really well and we drove down there and … we kind of stayed with that the next drive,” Smart said, asked why the Bulldogs abandoned the run. “We actually went back to it (the run). They changed some things up and it wasn’t working as well.” It put quarterback Jake Fromm in a difficult situation, with LSU running different looks than it had shown all year, making Georgia’s celebrated offensive line appear ineffective and overmatched at times. “We were just taking advantage of what they were giving to us,” said Fromm, who was sacked three times and pressured on several others, “and then they started kind of taking that away later in the game, and we started slinging the ball around a little bit.” Orgeron said the key  adjustment involved changing up the defensive fronts, creating different angles, with Aranda expertly mixing in different personnel to create problems for the Bulldogs. “We challenged our defensive line, especially (nose tackle) Ed Alexander,” Orgeron said. “That’s one of the best centers (Lamont Gaillard) we’ve seen. I thought he (Alexander) played one of his best games today. ” Smart said in the days leading up to the game he respected Aranda, his words foretelling. “ Dave Aranda is one of the premier defensive coordinators in the country, we look at what he does week to week, they do a tremendous job, always looking for new ideas, he’s a guy you look at,’ Smart said. “So for us, we’ve got to keep our quarterback’s upright. We’ve got to keep them in the pocket. Can’t get our offensive line confused.” It was clear by the end of the afternoon LSU was the better prepared team, its players out-executing what had been a very focused and dominant Georgia football team through the first half of the regular season. “ They played more physical than we did, they attacked us, they did a good job, they created turnovers, we didn’t do that, we didn’t protect the ball as good as we had,” Smart said, owning the defeat. “You can look at a lot of things, and I’m perfectly OK with that. We’re gonna look at a lot of things, and how we can get better.” Georgia dropped to No. 8 in the AP Top 25 poll with the loss, and No. 6 in the Coaches’ Poll. Georgia-LSU football DawgNation Georgia-LSU top-rated television game, Atlanta market shines Kirby Smart defends Jake Fromm at LSU Georgia football saw warning signs, couldn’t dodge Tigers’ trap Why didn’t Georgia use Justin Fields more? Report card: Bulldogs bomb midterm Georgia football stock report, LSU cashes in on Dawgs mistakes Instant analysis: Georgia melts in Louisiana heat against LSU Tigers came at Georgia for four downs on each series RECAP: Scoring, injuries, news from Georgia’s 36-16 loss to LSU Georgia planned ill-fated field goal early in the week Georgia rushing attack goes AWOL in battle at LSU   The post On the beat: LSU defensive wizard outschemed Georgia’s multifaceted offense appeared first on DawgNation.
  • Georgia eased past UNC Asheville, 20-7, in a 14-inning exhibition victory on Sunday afternoon in front of a crowd of 361 at Foley Field.  The visiting Bulldogs got on the scoreboard first, putting across three runs in the top of the second inning after a hit-by-pitch, walk and three singles.    Georgia wasted no time on answering with five runs in the bottom half of the inning. Riley King, Kaden Fowler, Patrick Sullivan led off the inning with consecutive doubles. After Tucker Maxwell reached on a bunt, Tucker Bradley cleared the bases with a home run shot into the trees beyond the right-center field wall.  Another five run inning followed for the Bulldogs in the third, giving Georgia a healthy 10-3 lead. Jon Cable and Sullivan scored on a wild pitch and passed ball, respectively, while a groundout roller to first by Fowler allowed King to score. The other two runs came off RBI singles from Cam Shepherd and LJ Talley.   At the extended seventh inning stretch, the score read 12-5. Georgia struck first after the reset with a RBI single from King that scored C.J. Smith. UNC Asheville scored two in the ninth inning to cut its deficit to 13-7.    Chaney Rogers found the right field bleachers off the bounce in the 11th for a RBI ground rule double that scored Talley.    King finished off his impressive day with a grand slam that landed in the camera stand just past the center field wall. King went 4 for 7 with two doubles and five RBIs. Bradley finished 3 for 5 with a home run, stolen base and three RBIs. Georgia amassed nine doubles on the day.   Georgia used 13 pitchers in which 10 threw a scoreless inning. Tim Elliot and Riley Crean registered three strikeouts each in their one inning of work. Darryn Pasqua closed out the day on the mound with two strikeouts in one inning.   The contest concluded the fall exhibition series, however the Bulldogs will compete in the annual Bulldog World Series, a three-game intersquad affair, occurring Nov. 2-4.  Coach's CornerIke Cousins Head Baseball Coach Scott Stricklin  On the run production today... 'I thought we had some really good at-bats early. Innings one-through-four, I thought our guys were pretty locked in. We had good at-bats – almost every single guy went in there and battled and had good at-bats. Late in the game we did that too. I think the first four innings and the last four innings, I thought we were awfully good offensively. We took advantage of some things that they gave us – we got some walks, and they made a couple errors. Good teams take advantage of those things, so I thought early and late we were very good offensively.'   On what to improve on as fall practice continues... 'The bottom line is we gave up too many free passes. We walked or hit 17 guys today. We played 14 innings, that's a long day, but that's too many free passes, and that's going to come back to haunt you. So we have to be better in the strike zone. A lot of young guys out there getting their first taste of college baseball, so it was to be expected a little bit, but that needs to clean up. We need to throw more strikes; we need to be more aggressive in the zone. If we do, I think our pitching staff can be really, really good, when we put everybody together. A lot of young guys went out there, with some mixed results. Some guys were very good, some guys have a lot of work to do. More than anything, we've got to throw strikes.' Player's Perspective RS-Soph. 3rd #31 Riley King  On his approach at the plate... 'Coach has been preaching staying even, and just going with your gut. Staying even, not trying to get too hot, not trying to get too low. Just going in there with a lot of confidence. It's been a big thing for me...this year, I'm going up there with a lot more confidence.'   On the benefit of fall scrimmages as a hitter... 'Every week, we see the same guys (on our team). So being able to see new arms is pretty good – seeing different arm slots, different angles. Just getting the confidence against other people. When you see the same guys over and over, they start learning you, so being able to see a new pitcher is a good experience for sure.”
  • ATHENS, Ga. — Kirby Smart made it clear Georgia football isn’t ready to go away, even after a 36-16 defeat at LSU that dropped the Bulldogs to No. 8 in the AP Top 25 rankings. “T he message for us is everything we want is in front of us,” Smart said. “The key for us is to move forward. We still have a good football team. We still have an opportunity to do everything we want to do. “Every opportunity that we had before this game is still in front of us. The margin of error is just smaller. We’ve got to get better.” The Bulldogs’ odds to win the College Football Playoff championship are sure to drop from where they were last Monday, at 7-to-1 per VegasInsider. But odds and betting lines aren’t always accurate indicators, as last Saturday’s game in Death Valley proved. Georgia (6-1, 4-1 SEC) was a 7-point favorite over LSU, largely based on the respect the team earned during its SEC championship season and College Football Playoff title game run of a year ago. This season’s UGA team has not beat an opponent that’s currently ranked in the Top 25 The Bulldogs lost several key pieces and rank as the youngest team in the SEC with more than two-thirds of the roster (68 percent) freshmen or sophomores. Still, Georgia controls its own destiny, with showdowns against Florida in Jacksonville on Oct. 27 and at Kentucky on Nov. 3. “W e’re a team, and that we’re going to bounce back from this,” Smart told his team following the loss in Tiger Stadium Saturday night. “This is very similar to last year (losing at Auburn), we probably played better leading up to our loss last year, I didn’t think we had played as well this year.” SEC East Division co-leader and No. 11-ranked Florida (6-1, 4-1), like Georgia, has a bye this week. But upstart Kentucky (5-1, 3-1), ranked No. 14, is in action against Vanderbilt in a 7:30 p.m. game in Lexington. The Wildcats have opened as an 11 1/2-point favorite over the Commodores, according to VegasInsider.com. Vanderbilt was a hard-luck loser in Nashville on Saturday to Florida, 37-27. Kentucky, like Georgia, controls its own destiny having defeat the Gators 27-16 in Week 2. The Wildcats, whose only SEC defeat came at Texas A&M, play at Missouri on Oct. 27 leading up to their showdown with the Bulldogs. Here is the line for all of the SEC football games this week: Vanderbilt at Kentucky (-11 1/2) Alabama at Tennessee (TBA) Tulsa at Arkansas (TBA) Memphis at Missouri (-7) Auburn (-2 1/2) at Ole Miss Mississippi State at LSU (-6 1/2)   The post Georgia football odds for title diminish with loss, but Bulldogs control destiny appeared first on DawgNation.