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World News Headlines

    The indictment of Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu is expected to sharpen the battle lines in Israel’s already deadlocked political system and could test the loyalty of his right-wing allies. It appears to have dashed any remaining hopes for a unity government following September’s elections, paving the way for an unprecedented third vote in less than a year. In a column Friday in Israel’s Yediot Ahronot newspaper, Amit Segal says the election will be “a civil war without arms.” Writing in the same newspaper, Sima Kadmon compared Netanyahu to the Roman emperor Nero, saying “he will stand and watch as the country burns.” The corruption charges will weigh heavily on Netanyahu’s Likud party, but it’s unclear if any senior member has the support, or willingness, to replace him.
  • Hong Kong is gearing for local elections that have become a referendum on public support for more than five months of protests. For the first time, all 452 seats on the city’s 18 councils are contested in Hong Kong’s only fully democratic elections on Sunday. The pro-democracy opposition hopes to win a decisive victory on the back of public anger against the government and police. Pro-government candidates concede they are the underdogs but are urging voters to choose stability over violence. Among the new faces running is Cathy Yau, a former police officer who quit in July exasperated at the increasing use of force to quell the unrest. She says, “I cannot accept the fact that tear gas is fired everywhere and police brutality is getting worse.”
  • Activists say more than 130 women have died from domestic violence this year alone in France. European Union studies show France has a higher rate of domestic violence than most of its European peers. Frustrated activists are now drawing national attention to a problem President Emmanuel Macron has called “France’s shame.” They have glued posters with the names of the dead to French city walls. By the hundreds, they have walked silently through city streets after each new death. Two years after Macron made a campaign pledge to tackle the problem, the government has begun to act. The government will announce measures Monday that are expected to include seizing firearms from suspects, prioritizing police training and formally recognizing “psychological violence” as a form of domestic violence.
  • She made him wait for her while she chatted with Thailand’s king and queen. She chided him for only visiting Bangkok and not the “real Thailand.” And she got a chuckle out of “Jorge” when she took her time translating his off-the-cuff Spanish for local priests and nuns to understand. Sister Ana Rosa Sivori has taken something of a star turn during her second cousin’s visit to Thailand, assuming an unprecedented role for a woman as papal whisperer and translator, who doesn’t seem fazed that her charge is Pope Francis. Usually papal aides are men, and they stay in the shadows, showing wallflower-like deference to the leader of the 1.2-billion strong Catholic Church. Not so Sivori, who treats Francis with the respect owed a pope but nevertheless displays the confidence of a nun who has spent more than a half-century ministering to Thailand’s faithful. Sivori, a 77-year-old member of the Salesian order, is an assistant principal at a Salesian school in Udon Thani, in northern Thailand. She arrived in the country in 1966 as a young sister from Argentina, where her father and Jorge Mario Bergoglio’s mother were first cousins. She has said her father knew early on that there was something special about “Jorge,” a sentiment that spread to the rest of the family. “He always said ‘No one touches Jorge.’ He had a special affection for him,” Sivori told Italian journalists before the trip. It’s apparently mutual: Francis sends Sivori handwritten letters regularly, and he prepares packages of books for her to read, with envelopes that he addresses himself. Sivori lamented that Francis would only visit Bangkok, saying its skyscrapers and luxury hotels were by no means representative of the rest of the country. The “real Thailand” was outside the capital, she said. Francis set the tone of their time in Bangkok when he descended from his Alitalia charter on Wednesday afternoon. Before even greeting Surayud Chulanont, the former prime minister and head of King Maha Vajiralongkorn's Privy Council who was dispatched to the airport to welcome him, Francis broke diplomatic protocol to give Sivori a kiss on each cheek as she waited at the foot of the stairs. That informality carried through the rest of their time together, with Sivori taking the place of the local bishop in Francis’ car as he went from appointment to appointment. Based on their body language, she was giving him pointers and details at each stop. The visuals were striking, given Francis has no female advisers and usually has a cleric by his side whispering in his ear. Francis has long insisted that the Catholic Church is “female” and that women should have a more prominent role in leadership positions. That he finally let a woman upstage him a bit was remarkable, especially in a country known for the many women and girls who are trafficked and exploited. Sivori’s starring role peaked Thursday afternoon, when she joined Francis for his private meeting with King Maha Vajiralongkorn and Queen Suthida at the royal palace. Sivori translated, dutifully describing the gifts Francis brought and cheerfully relaying to the pope what the king had said. At the end of their visit, Francis bade the royals farewell and made his way down the stairs to the waiting car. Sivori, though, remained at the palace entrance, chatting for nearly a minute with the royal couple while Francis waited for her. Eventually, she finished her own goodbyes and took her place next to him in the back seat. Francis appeared to rib her the next day when Sivori was translating his remarks to nuns and priests at St. Peter’s Parish outside Bangkok. As he tends to do when speaking to a religious audience, Francis deviated from his prepared text and urged the nuns to allow themselves to be “surprised” by the joys and sorrows of their vocation. Sivori took a few seconds to write down his comments before beginning the translation. The delay prompted Francis to look at her, raise his eyebrows and gesture for her to get on with it. Their silent exchange Friday drew laughs from the pews and a heartfelt chuckle from the pope, who apologized for not being able to speak directly to his flock.
  • Preliminary investigations show a young Somali Canadian peace activist was killed by a stray bullet earlier this week in Mogadishu, the peacekeeping mission in Somalia said Friday, while her family prepared her memorial. The statement by the African Union mission said Almaas Elman was hit while traveling in a car Wednesday inside a heavily defended base near the international airport where many diplomats and aid workers have offices. The former diplomat was the latest member of Somalia’s diaspora to be killed after returning home to help rebuild the country after decades of conflict, including a Somali Canadian journalist who died in a bomb blast in July. Elman’s family founded a prominent peace center in Somalia and her sister Ilwad was reportedly short-listed for this year’s Nobel Peace Prize. In a brief statement Thursday, Ilwad Elman said “we will lay my sister Almas to rest” at a mosque in Mogadishu during Friday prayers. “Thank you for all of the love.” The AU statement said there was no record of a weapon being fired inside the base at the time Almaas Elman was shot and other stray bullets had been reported previously. It called her death “heart-wrenching and unfortunate.” The sisters fled Somalia with their mother, Fartuun Adan, in the early 1990s as the country’s warlord-led chaos deepened after the fall of President Siad Barre. Their father, Elman Ali Ahmed, stayed behind to run the Elman Peace center until he was murdered in 1996. A decade later, Adan returned from Canada to continue the work and the daughters followed. They found Mogadishu in the grip of the al-Qaida-linked al-Shabab extremist group, which had formed and spread during their time away. Even years after the extremists were chased out of the capital by the AU force, al-Shabab still carries out bombings against hotels and other high-profile targets in the seaside city. A devastating truck bombing in Mogadishu in 2017 killed well over 500 people. Only this year has the U.S. Embassy been re-established in Somalia, nearly 30 years after its staffers fled. Amid the insecurity, Almaas Elman was among a growing number of young Somali professionals returning from the diaspora to help rebuild the country, rural parts of which are still controlled by al-Shabab. She had been working with the European Union in Somalia. “We had been blessed by her energy for the last months. Her memory will be with us,” the EU ambassador, Nicolas Berlanga, tweeted. As Somalia’s federal government finds its footing, efforts of peacemakers are crucial. Tensions between the federal government and regional states continue ahead of a presidential election as early as late next year, and security is a huge concern as the AU force prepares to withdraw and hand over security to ill-prepared Somali forces. ___ Associated Press writer Abdi Guled in Mogadishu contributed. ___ Follow Africa news at https://twitter.com/AP_Africa
  • A New Zealand jury on Friday found a man guilty of murder in the death of 22-year-old British backpacker Grace Millane. Millane died last December on her birthday after meeting the man through the dating app Tinder, going out for drinks with him, and then returning to his hotel apartment in central Auckland. Prosecutors said the man strangled Millane to death. Defense lawyers claimed the death was accidental after the pair engaged in consensual erotic choking that went too far. But the jury didn’t buy the defense. After the three-week trial, they deliberated for about five hours on Friday afternoon before returning the guilty verdict. The name of the 27-year-old man is being kept secret for now by court order, a restriction that is sometimes imposed in the New Zealand judicial system. The man will likely face a mandatory life sentence, which comes with a minimum 10-year non-parole period. He is due to be sentenced Feb. 21. After the trial, Millane’s parents Gillian and David tearfully told media the verdict was welcomed by friends and family alike. “It will not reduce the pain and suffering we have had to endure over the past year,” David Millane said. “Grace was taken in the most brutal fashion a year ago and our lives have been ripped apart.” He said that “Grace was our sunshine and she will be missed forever.” Millane had been traveling through New Zealand as part of a planned yearlong trip abroad after graduating from university. After the man killed Millane, he stuffed her body into a suitcase, drove to the Waitakere Ranges forest and buried her in a shallow grave, where police found her body a week later. Her death shocked many in New Zealand, which prides itself on welcoming tourists and where many people travel abroad as well. Hundreds of people attended candlelight vigils after she died, and Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern spoke about New Zealanders feeling 'hurt and shame' that she was killed in their country. Tourism is also one of New Zealand’s largest industries, accounting for more than 20% of foreign exchange earnings and about 6% of the overall economy. The case has been closely followed in Britain as well. Among the key pieces of evidence for prosecutors was testimony from pathologists about the length of time, about five to 10 minutes, and amount of force it would take to kill somebody by strangling them. Prosecutor Brian Dickey said that at some point, Millane would have lost consciousness, meaning the man would have needed to keep strangling her after she went lifeless under his grip, news organization RNZ reported. One woman, who had previously dated the man, testified she feared for her life during a sexual encounter with him after the man sat on her face, restricting her breathing without her consent. Prosecutors said the man took explicit photos of Millane after she died, RNZ reported, and used Google to search for “Waitakere Ranges” and “hottest fire” as he tried to figure out how to dispose of her body. Defense lawyers argued Millane’s death came down to two young, drunk and inexperienced people taking rough sex too far. The man told police that Millane had asked him to choke her and then encouraged him to use more force. The defense argued the Google searches were random and it wasn’t until the next morning when the man woke up that he realized Millane was dead and panicked, deciding to bury her rather than calling emergency services. 'It is natural for you to have sympathy for the Millane family and for Grace, who was here on what should have been a happy and exciting adventure,' Auckland High Court Judge Simon Moore told jurors in his summing up, news organization Stuff reported. But the judge said jurors couldn’t let media reports or their emotions intrude on their “solemn task” of reaching a verdict based solely on the evidence presented in the courtroom.
  • Iranian authorities slowly eased up their sweeping blockage of internet access on Friday, as U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo called for Iranians to send the U.S. videos “documenting the regime’s crackdown” on protesters. “The U.S. will expose and sanction the abuses,” Pompeo tweeted early Friday, as pockets of Iran saw internet over landlines restored. Authorities have said the internet may be entirely restored soon, suggesting Iran’s government put down the demonstrations that began Nov. 15 over government-set gasoline prices rising. Amnesty International said Tuesday that protest unrest and a subsequent security crackdown killed at least 106 people. Iran disputes that figure without offering its own. A U.N. office earlier said it feared the unrest may have killed “a significant number of people.” The jump in gasoline prices represents yet another burden on Iranians who have suffered through a painful currency collapse. That’s a result of the reimposition of crippling U.S. economic sanctions as part of President Donald Trump’s maximum pressure campaign against Tehran, following his unilateral withdrawal of the U.S. from Iran’s 2015 nuclear deal with world powers. Iran’s relatively moderate President Hassan Rouhani has promised the fuel price increase will fund new subsidies for poor families. Rouhani declared victory Wednesday in the unrest, blaming “the Zionists and Americans” for the violence. Abolhassan Firoozabadi, the secretary of Iran's Supreme Cyberspace Council, told journalists Thursday that he believed the internet would be turned on “within the next two days.” Authorities restored internet service Thursday in Iran’s Hormozgan province, home to the port city of Bandar Abbas, the state-run IRNA news agency report. Semiofficial news agencies said service was being restored in other parts of the country on Thursday afternoon, something the internet watchdog NetBlocks also noted. “At the current time national connectivity has risen further to 10%,” NetBlocks said in a tweet. Iran’s state TV said Friday that air defense exercises were being carried out as part of its annual military drills. State TV showed footage of air defense missile systems being fired and a patrol by jet fighters in the northern Semnan province. Iran operates a domestically built air defense system alongside the sophisticated S-300 defense system from Russia. In June, Iran shot down an unmanned U.S. drone over the strategic Strait of Hormuz for alleged violation of its airspace. Meanwhile, activists said Thursday that six conservationists working to save the critically endangered Asiatic cheetah have been sentenced to prison on internationally criticized espionage charges in Iran. The New York-based Center for Human Rights in Iran said Thursday that the convicted members of the nonprofit Persian Wildlife Heritage Foundation face six to 10 years in prison for “contacts with the U.S. enemy state.” The conservationists found themselves arrested over their use of camera traps to track the cheetahs, a common tool of wildlife experts.
  • Police will be out in force at polling stations in Hong Kong this weekend as keenly contested local elections take place amid ongoing anti-government protests. Hong Kong’s new police commissioner, Tang Ping-keung, told reporters Friday that officers would deal with any outbreak of violence immediately without hesitation. Six masked protesters surrendered before dawn, bringing to about 30 the number that have come out in the past day from a university campus surrounded by police. The group emerged from a campus entrance and held hands as they walked toward a checkpoint around 3 a.m. Five wore the black clothing favored by the movement and the other was in a blue checked shirt. Most of the protesters who took over Hong Kong Polytechnic University last week have left, but an unknown number have remained inside for days, hoping somehow to avoid arrest. Police are arresting all the adults, while those under 18 can go home but may face charges later. The anti-government protesters battled with police and blocked the nearby approach to a major road tunnel, which remains closed. It was the latest bout in more than five months of unrest in the semi-autonomous Chinese territory. Protesters are demanding fully democratic elections and an investigation into alleged police brutality in suppressing the demonstrations. Anti-government rallies were held in at least two places Thursday night. Riot police kept watch, exchanging heated words with some, but there were no major clashes ahead of district council elections on Sunday. Protesters fear that the government could cancel the elections because of the unrest. City leaders have said they want to go ahead with the vote but warned that violence could make it impossible to hold a fair and safe election. Asked if the police presence would make voters feel uncomfortable, Commissioner Tang said it will make citizens “feel safe to go out and vote.” The election is seen as a bellwether for public support for the protests.
  • Pope Francis tended to the needs of Thailand’s tiny Catholic hierarchy Friday, urging priests and nuns to find ways to communicate the faith with “a Thai face and flesh” in an overwhelmingly Buddhist country. Thousands of Thais welcomed Francis as he travelled to St. Peter’s Parish, a Catholic community outside Bangkok, to pray at the sanctuary of Thailand’s first martyred priest. There, he told a few hundred priests and nuns that he read “with some pain” that for many Thais, Christianity is “a religion for foreigners.” “This should spur us to find ways to talk about the faith in dialect, like a mother who sings lullabies to her child,” he said. “With that same intimacy, let us give faith a Thai face and flesh, which involves much more than making translations.” Children dressed as monks and nuns, as well as real-life religious and ordinary Catholics cheered him as he passed through the crowd outside the church in his popemobile and later on foot. “Viva il papa,” or “Long live the pope,” they shouted in Italian. It was the first time in a generation that Thais have seen a pope up close, after St. John Paul II became the first pope to visit Thailand in 1984. 'It's been 35 years so everyone is so very happy,” said Tuangsin Pureepaswong, a 60-year-old research engineer from Rayong province. “May the Holy Father pray to God for us all.” Pornnutcha Kruprasert, a 14-year-old training to be a nun from southern Prachuap Khiri Khan province, said she was “excited and delighted” to see the pope. 'The pope always has good thoughts for all youths,” she said cheerfully. “We can bring his teachings into real life.' After meeting with clergy and nuns, Francis was meeting with members of his own Jesuit order and bishops from across Asia to encourage them to spread the faith as their missionary predecessors did. In the afternoon, he attends an interfaith encounter, where he’s expected to highlight areas where Catholics can cooperate with Buddhists, Muslims and members of other Christian denominations. Francis wraps up the day with a Mass dedicated to young people at Bangkok’s Cathedral of the Assumption. He leaves Saturday for Japan for the second and final leg of his trip. At the end of his first full day in Bangkok on Thursday, Francis celebrated Mass for an estimated 60,000 people at Bangkok’s national sports stadium. There he denounced the “humiliation” of women and children forced into prostitution — a reference to the human trafficking and poverty that help fuel the region’s sex tourism industry. In addition to Thais, Catholics came to see the pope from Vietnam, Cambodia and even China. Siriwan Bunrachaisawan, a 23-year-old member of the S'gaw ethnic group from Mae Hong Son province, spent a full day Wednesday travelling from northern Thailand to attend the Mass. She said she teared up when she finally saw Francis. “I was overwhelmed,” she said. “My heart is overwhelmed. It is the first time in my life.” She said Francis’ visit is particularly important for young Thais, to learn and think about their faith “and see that religion is something precious.” ___ Winfield reported from Bangkok.
  • Amnesty International is denouncing what it calls serious human rights violations by security forces in Chile. The human rights group said in a report released Thursday that security forces had violated protesters’ rights to peaceful assembly and free expression. The group mentions the use of military armament against protesters and said it had documented torture, sexual abuse, and eye injuries from pellet guns and tear gas. Chile’s National Institute of Human Rights says 26 people have been killed and more than 2,300 civilians injured in the protests. It says security forces are confirmed to have killed five people. Amnesty International cites police as saying 1,600 officers have been injured. President Sebastián Piñera has acknowledged that excessive force had been used to clamp down on demonstrators with legitimate social demands

Local News

  • The University of Georgia is ranked 13th in the nation for the number of students who study abroad, according to the latest Open Doors ranking from Institute of International Education. UGA was one of only two Southeastern Conference universities and the only institution in Georgia to be ranked in the top 20. Every year, with the backing of the U.S. Department of State’s Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs, IIE conducts a survey on U.S. students studying abroad for academic credit and publishes the results in the Open Doors Report. In addition to ranking 13th overall, UGA was ninth in short-term study abroad programs. “We at the Office of Global Engagement are thankful to the UGA leadership for the support of student global experiential learning,” said Yana Cornish, director of global education. “We are proud to support a culture of study abroad among students, faculty and staff and are committed to expanding global experiential learning opportunities to all students, with particular consideration for underrepresented, rural, first-generation and other underserved students.” More than 2,600 UGA undergraduate and graduate students studied abroad in programs facilitated UGA Office of Global Engagement during the 2017-2018 academic year. “UGA’s position in the national rankings reflects the growing demand among students for a study abroad experience, the increased availability of scholarship funding provided by the university and individual donors, and the tireless dedication of our faculty, who are committed to offering academically rigorous programs,” said Noel Fallows, associate provost for the Office of Global Engagement. “Although many of our programs take place during the summer months, they are a year-round commitment for faculty, who work behind the scenes developing cost-effective budgets and preparing culturally immersive courses to create optimal, memorable and transformative international experiences.” Jack Hu, the university’s senior vice president for academic affairs and provost, added that UGA’s Open Doors ranking underscores the institution’s stature as a national leader in experiential learning. “The University of Georgia is one of the nation’s largest public universities to ensure that all of our undergraduate students benefit from learning opportunities such as study abroad, internships, service-learning and research,” Hu said. “These experiences position students for career success and lay the foundation for a lifetime of engaged citizenship.” Additional information on all UGA Education Abroad programs are available on the StudyAway portal: https://studyaway.uga.edu/
  • ATHENS Georgia basketball has made it a historical start to the season with Wednesday night's 82-78 win over rival Georgia Tech. It was the Bulldogs' fifth-straight win in the series, the first time that has happened in 79 years, and the 10,205 fans at Stegeman Coliseum couldn't have been more happy. 'This is a huge rivalry,' Georgia coach Tom Crean said. 'I said to the team, there are gong to be things in life that are so much bigger than you, and a game like this is one of them. 'When those seniors can say they never lost those games, that's a big deal.' Junior Rayshaun Hammonds carried the load for the Bulldogs (4-0), matching his season high with 26 points while pulling down 9 rebounds against the Yellow Jackets (2-1). Projected NBA lottery pick Anthony Edwards had 18 points and 8 rebounds, and senior grad-transfer Donnell Gresham Jr. had 13 points and 6 rebounds. Edwards, of course, made history by scoring 53 points in his first two games, eclipsing the freshman record previously held by Georgia and NBA Great Dominique Wilkins (1979). Michael Devoe had 34 points including a last-second, half-court shot to lead Georgia Tech. The Yellow Jackets opened the Nov. 5 with an 82-81 overtime road win over North Carolina State. Hammonds dominated the first half, scoring 19 of his points through the first 20 minutes. It carried into the second half with Georgia leading by as many as 16 points. 'It's a big win for us,' Hammonds said. 'I haven't lost to them, I don't want to lose to them.' A degree of uncertainty crept into the building with 10:15 remaining, however, when Hammonds picked up his fourth foul while scrambling for a loose ball. Hammonds took his 26 points and 8 rebounds to the bench, and Crean and the Bulldogs turned to freshman Anthony 'Antman' Edwards. Edwards, 1-of-8 shooting to that point with 5 points, drained a 3-pointer on the next trip down to make it 59-48 a the 9:41 mark. It triggered a 10-2 run that Edwards capped with a drive to the basket that made it 66-50. 'We did a good job on Edwards, he made some big plays late,' Georgia Tech coach Josh Pastner said. 'He's a pro, he's going to be one of the top 3 draft picks, pros do that.' The Bulldogs had used a 13-2 run to end the first half and take control of what had been a back-and-forth first half, leading 35-27 intermission. Edwards had just 2 points at the half, and he didn't score his first field goal until hitting a long jumper that made it 42-31 with 17:50 left. The Bulldogs fans came to life, and it was another big crowd. Georgia, in fact, has the second-largest season attendance in school history through four games (35,152), approaching the record set in 1981 when Stegeman Coliseum held 11,200 and drew 38,741 through its first four games. More history will be made when Georgia returns to action at 2:30 p.m. next Monday in the Maui Invitational against Dayton (TV: ESPN2). The Bulldogs, making their first-ever appearance in the prestigious will play again on Tuesday (Michigan State or Virginia Tech) and Wednesday (TBD). DawgNation Georgia basketball coverage Georgia overwhelms Delaware State, Rayshaun Hammonds stars UGA drops The Citadel, Anthony Edwards scores 29 Anthony Edwards having fun, but Tom Crean expects more Tom Crean wants more control against The Citadel RELATED: Anthony Edwards draws standing ovation in opener Georgia basketball strikes exhibition gold vs. Charlotte 49ers Sahvir Wheeler hidden star, directs point after first exhibition Anthony Edwards lives up to hype in exhibition opener Georgia freshman already making basketball history The post Georgia basketball off to historic start, dumps Georgia Tech 82-78 appeared first on DawgNation.
  • ATHENS — A faint, round, red spot just above his shirt collar is the only obvious physical evidence that something happened to Tate Prezzano nearly seven months ago. However, inside the University of Georgia student’s body a bullet fragment remains lodged just one millimeter from his spinal cord after he was shot multiple times near campus.  “One millimeter. One ‘mm.’ It is the smallest measurement you can get in the metric system,” his father, Dobbin Prezzano, said. To Prezzano and his father, the abbreviation “1 mm” has taken on a new meaning: “One man’s mission,” the tagline for the new foundation and scholarship program Tate Prezzano created in the wake of the shooting.  Prezzano introduced the foundation Wednesday morning at a news conference at Piedmont Athens Regional Medical Center, the hospital where he underwent his medical treatment after the shooting. It was the 22-year-old’s first public appearance since the April 22 incident. Prezzano said the focus of his foundation, named the TateTough Foundation after the social media hashtag that began trending during his recovery, is to effect safety and security on college campuses.  RELATED: UGA victim ID’d as lacrosse player; police release sketch of alleged shooter Prezzano is part of UGA’s club lacrosse team and played lacrosse and football at Cambridge High School in Milton.  As the junior communications major was waiting at an Athens bus stop, a man approached him, robbed him and shot him multiple times in the upper part of his body. “Few incidents are more concerning than a young man standing at the bus stop, waiting to go to college, that is accosted by an armed assailant, robbed and shot,” Athens-Clarke County police Chief Cleveland Spruill said in a news conference after the shooting.  It happened about 7:15 a.m. the Monday after Easter, Prezzano said. His bus was scheduled to arrive at 7:18 a.m.  He said he saw something move out of the corner of his eye, and when he looked up a man was pointing a gun at him.  Prezzano was hit in the shoulder, in the neck and in the back of the head. He laid bleeding on the sidewalk, watching cars go by and hoping one would stop.  “I actually saw my bus go by,” he said.  One man pulled over. Phil Haymore, who manages the intensive care unit at Piedmont Athens, was on his way to work when he saw Prezzano on the ground.  “I have a son at UGA. He’s right around Tate’s age,” Haymore said. “As far as I’m concerned, my son was laying on the sidewalk.”  Haymore provided care for Prezzano until emergency medical services arrived and took him to the hospital. He remained there for six days.   A second UGA student was also robbed at gunpoint near the bus stop, which is just south of campus and the Athens Perimeter. That student was not hurt in the incident, which occurred moments before Prezzano was shot. He was able to give police a description of the suspect, which was used to create a sketch. It depicted a man with medium-length braids or dreads. Not long after the sketch was released, GBI special agent Mike Ayers said tips started pouring in from community members. MORE: Gwinnett man arrested in shooting of UGA lacrosse player from metro Atlanta Zarren Garner, 20, of Grayson, was arrested in Gwinnett County the next morning. Spruill said they were able to identify Garner through a number of citizen tips and because of the man’s prior “low-level criminal background.”  Thus began Tate Prezzano’s recovery process. He said he spent about five days a week in physical therapy over the summer. He wasn’t able to take summer classes for his major.  “His typical regimen over the summer of academics and athletics ... was going to be replaced by physical therapy, occupational therapy, aquatic therapy,” his father said.  The foundation is part of Prezzano’s recovery process. The first pillar of its three-part mission is to support Prezzano throughout his doctor visits, therapy sessions and various treatments.  The second part, Prezzano said, is to encourage other athletes.  “Our goal is to promote funding for scholarships at two schools that have been an integral part of and made an impression on Tate: The University of Georgia and Cambridge High School,” the TateTough website said. “The Foundation will award a $1,000 scholarship to one University of Georgia lacrosse player and one Cambridge High School athlete each year that the Foundation can support the effort.”  “This scholarship is going to go to the person (we) feel exemplifies what the ultimate teammate would be,” Prezzano said. “The ultimate teammate, in my opinion, is not necessarily the ‘rah-rah’ guy. It’s not necessarily the all-star or the best player. He’s the kind of person that would come off the field if he needs to, he would go on the field and play a different position, or just kind of do whatever is asked and be reliable.”  But invaluable to the TateTough Foundation is the need to augment campus safety, Prezzano said. The foundation is working with UGA to explore options to make the campus safer, such as improved kiosks and phone apps that would allow for a more immediate response in the case of an emergency. Campus safety is at the top of his mind now that Prezzano has resumed taking classes at UGA.   He is still undergoing physical therapy three times a week. However, he is taking 16 credit hours this semester, he said. After 15 more in the spring and one hour during a May semester, Prezzano will walk with his graduating class, he said.  Prezzano said he hopes the foundation’s mission of encouraging campus safety can reach other colleges. He wants his story to help other students be cognizant of their surroundings.  “We are still figuring the world out,” he said. “We don’t know what to look for.” 
  • A former Louisiana State University student was sentenced Wednesday to five years in prison for his role in the alcohol-related hazing death of a freshman from Roswell, but a judge suspended all but 2½ years of the term, according to local media reports.  Matthew Naquin was also sentenced to 1,000 hours of community service, three years of probation when released and he must pay a $1,000 fine, The Advocate reported.  Naquin, 21, of Fair Oaks Ranch, Texas, was convicted in July of negligent homicide in the September 2017 death of Max Gruver.  Gruver, 18, died after a hazing incident at the Phi Delta Theta fraternity house, according to investigators. He had an alcohol level of .495% — more than six times the legal limit for drivers — at the time of his death, the East Baton Rouge Parish Coroner’s Office previously said.  LSU President F. King Alexander temporarily suspended all Greek activities after Gruver’s death. The fraternity’s national headquarters also suspended the LSU chapter. Gruver was a 2017 graduate of Blessed Trinity High School and planned to study journalism at LSU. He loved sports and helped coach younger children, including his sister’s basketball team, according to his family.  “Max was very lovable. He cared a lot about people,” Eugene Gruver, Max’s grandfather, told The Atlanta Journal-Constitution the day after his death. “He was bright, he was intelligent. He was so talented. He knew all about sports.” Prosecutors placed the bulk of the blame for Gruver’s death on Naquin. At trial, they told the jury Naquin ripped up Gruver's bid card and made it his personal mission to keep Gruver out of the fraternity, the Advocate previously reported. During the ritual, when Gruver answered questions about the fraternity incorrectly, prosecutors said Naquin forced him to drink. In July, two other former LSU students were each sentenced to a month in jail for their roles in Gruver’s death.  Sean-Paul Gott, 22, of Lafayette, Louisiana, and Ryan Matthew Isto, 20, of Butte, Montana, pleaded no contest to misdemeanor hazing charges.
  • Planing to see the Georgia Bulldogs play at Mercedes-Benz for the SEC Championship on Dec.7?  Be aware of some rules and policies before heading to the game. Doors will open at 1:30 p.m. Kickoff is set for 3:30 p.m.  Leave your cash at home  In March, Mercedes-Benz Stadium became the first to adopt a stadium-wide cashless policy, a news release said. However, cash-to-card kiosks will be available at the Delta Sky360 Club, Mercedes-Benz Club, and by the team store. Fans can insert cash into a machine that will give back a pre-paid Visa card, with no transaction fee.  Don’t take just any bag Fans are encouraged to take clear bags to games for security reasons. Fans can take a one-gallon plastic freezer bag, or a clear bag no larger that 12 by 6 by 12 inches, according to SEC policy.  All bags will be checked at the secondary security perimeter set around the stadium and the Georgia World Congress Center.  For fans that take a bag, there will be four bag exchange locations: outside gates 1 and 2 of the stadium, and at the Georgia World Congress Center’s  Gold Deck and Hall B. Football fans will be charged $5 per bag they exchange. At Gate 1, fans can use the BinBox app to use a small locker for $5, a medium locker for $7, and a large locker for $9.  The clear bag policy exempts wallets and clutch purses that may be no bigger than 4.5 by 6.5 inches including the handle or strap.  There are exceptions to the the rule for medically necessary items.  Do your pom-poms or shakers have a paddle or a stick handle?  Mercedes-Benz stadium has a no stick handle policy for pompoms and shakers. Only those with a paddle handle will be allow inside the stadium, according to a news release. 

Bulldog News

  • ATHENS Kirby Smart opened the football portion of his Monday press conference talking about injuries, updating media on his banged-up offensive line and hobbled go-to receiver. It was a pre-emptive strike. The Georgia football head coach doesn't want to be asked abut the specifics, or go down the laundry list of players limited, or out or dealing with injuries. The media viewing portions of practices have been closed the past two weeks, the Bulldogs understandably not wanting opponents to know who is healthy enough to go through drills, and who has been sitting out. Georgia's football season is on the line once again this Saturday and Smart is no different than any other coach in the sense that he doesn't want to give away any more information than necessary. The No. 4-ranked Bulldogs (9-1, 6-1 SEC) play host to No. 24 Texas A&M (7-3, 4-2) at 3:30 p.m. on Saturday at Sanford Stadium (TV: CBS). It's a Georgia team that survived Auburn, 21-14, despite being out-gained 158 yards to 2 yards in the fourth quarter. The Bulldogs were missing three offensive by the end of the contest. Smart revealed after last Saturday's game that Ben Cleveland missed two practices following his SEC Offensive Lineman of the Week performance against Missouri. On Monday, Smart acknowledged that Georgia's Swiss Army Knife Offensive Lineman Cade Mays would miss time on the practice field. On Tuesday, Smart offered some hope, albeit, limited. Cade has been out there working, and Ben has practiced,' Smart said on Tuesday. 'Cade didn't do much yesterday, he did a lot more today as far as reps, we're hopeful he'll be able to go.' For receiver Lawrence Cager, who has been playing with a separated shoulder, Smart said it's a matter of how much he could 'sustain.' Even the staff photographer, Lauren Chamberlain, has been held out of action this week after her sideline collision with Brian Herrien. But Georgia has a fair share of players who have been playing despite injuries, receivers Tyler Simmons (shoulder) and Demetris Robertson (hamstring) both appearing somewhat limited, as well as defensive lineman David Marshall (foot) and offensive linemen Isaiah Wilson (ankle) and Trey Hill (ankle). Others simply don't put the pads on and thus don't get asked about anymore: Defensive back Tyrique McGhee (foot), receiver Tommy Bush (groin), quarterback D'Wan Mathis (head), lineman Justin Shaffer. Georgia football injury report WR Lawrence Cager (shoulder) probable WR Tyler Simmons (shoulder) probable C Trey Hill (ankle) probable OG Ben Cleveland (foot) probable DL David Marshall (foot) probable OL Cade Mays (ankle) questionable DB Tyrique McGhee (foot) doubtful QB D'Wan Mathis (head) out WR Tommy Bush (groin) out OL Justin Shaffer (neck) out Georgia football DawgNation Kirby Smart reveals redshirt plan for Georgia senior defensive lineman WATCH: Gus Malzahn says Auburn 'stuffed' Georgia in 4th quarter Georgia football stars make short list for Outland Trophy, Nagurski Award WATCH: Georgia QB Jake Fromm says offense must get better Georgia in select company, clinches third-straight SEC East Division title Jimbo Fisher says Jake Fromm as good as anyone in the country The post Georgia football injury report: Offense hobbled entering Texas A&M battle appeared first on DawgNation.
  • There's a different way to look at the bottom line for Georgia-Texas A&M this week. Especially in terms of what Jimbo Fisher and Kirby Smart bring to the table. Try a bottom line that charts $14,371,600. That is the reported combined 2019 salaries for the head coaches for that big SEC clash on Saturday. Read that line again. Digest that $14.3 million part. That's the number according to the latest 2019 salary figures in the annual USA Today report on coaching salaries for NCAA football . Fisher, who signed a 10-year deal worth $75 million in December of 2017, ranks as the fourth-highest paid head coach in college football. It makes one wonder why the nachos will not be $14.30 inside Sanford Stadium on Saturday. Fisher still has a robust buyout of $60 million. ( That means Jimmy Sexton's great-great-grandchildren are also getting Gucci every Christmas. Sexton represents five of the nation's 10-highest paid coaches and almost all of the SEC.) Smart comes in at No. 5 on that listing. His buyout is a mere $24.2 million for the remaining years on his deal. Several coaches, such as Auburn's Gus Malzhan (No.6) are slated to receive yearly pay hikes that will also take them into the $7 million per year range in 2020, too. The USA Today study places a somewhat unexpected name at the top. It was not Nick Saban, but still the head coach of the defending national champions nonetheless. Clemson's Dabo Swinney rates No. 1 on that database with a total compensation figure of $9,315,600 for 2019. Saban follows at No. 2 ($8.9 million) and Jim Harbaugh ($7.504 million) round out the top 3. The SEC also flexes the power of its TV deals and respective fan bases by placing the head coaches from five of its member schools among the top 10 in that survey. Mississippi State pays Joe Moorhead $3,050,000 on that listing. It will rank him last in the SEC, but that windfall places him at No. 48 out of the 122 coaching salaries tracked in that database. The post Jimbo Fisher and Kirby Smart both rank among the NCAA's highest-paid coaches appeared first on DawgNation.
  • ATHENS Rayshaun Hammonds says he just wants to win, and now that the 6-foot-8, 240-pounder has figured out what it will take from him, Georgia basketball could prove dangerous. Hammonds matched his season high in scoring with 26 points, also leading the young Bulldogs with 9 rebounds in their 82-78 win over an experienced and battled-tested Georgia Tech on Wednesday night. It was Georgia's fifth-straight win in the rivalry, the first time that has happened in 79 years. RELATED: Anthony Edwards helps spark historical start to season 'Rayshaun has had a breakthrough,' second-year Georgia coach Tom Crean said Wednesday night. 'You never known when breakthroughs are going to come, (and) you never know how breakthroughs are going to come, and you can't plan them. 'They have to be natural and he's doing a good job. Ray is letting things come to him.' Anthony Edwards, one of 10 new players on the team and a 6-5 combo guard projected to be a lottery pick in the 2020 NBA Draft, explained why the ball went inside to Hammonds throughout the first half. 'They were pressing me and Tyree (Crump) hard when we were getting the ball,' Edwards said. 'So if they are pressing us, we've got the best four man in the country, he's going to eat.' Indeed, Hammonds scored 19 of his points in the first half, helping Georgia take a 35-27 lead to intermission. 'I thought [Rayshaun] Hammonds was a stud tonight,' Georgia Tech coach Josh Pastner said. 'Obviously, we recruited him hard, too. He's a really good basketball player and he really had a great game and is a big difference maker for them, especially in that first half. 'That was the difference tonight, what Hammonds did in the first half, that set the tone.' Crean has been challenging Hammonds to be a difference-maker and set the tone in practice, too, harping on him publicly and privately to become more consistent. Edwards can score all the points and make all the highlights, but if Hammonds doesn't provide a physical presence in the paint, Georgia will likely miss the NCAA Tournament for what would be the seventh time in the past eight years. The Bulldogs' hopes took a major hit last summer when All-SEC sophomore Nicolas Claxton left for the NBA, adding to attrition that included six seniors and three underclassmen transfers. Georgia lost more than 56 percent of its scoring off last year's team and 63 percent of its rebounding. But Edwards has come in with a signing class that ranked fifth in the nation, and the 10 new players have brought enough firepower and positive energy to help get Hammonds going. 'The incoming freshmen took a lot of stress off me, because they can play,' said Hammonds, who was ranked the 51st-best player in the 2017 class coming out of Norcross. 'We have dogs, nobody is scared to get on the floor. The main focus is to play physical, you don't want to get punked by other teams.' Hammonds has proven he can supply the muscle as well as provide an outside touch, connecting on 2 of 4 attempts beyond the 3-point arc against Georgia Tech. 'Rayshaun did a great job leading us,' Edwards said, 'and we followed.' Georgia basketball's Anthony Edwards and Rayshaun Hammonds Georgia basketball coach Tom Crean DawgNation Georgia basketball c Georgia overwhelms Delaware State, Rayshaun Hammonds stars UGA drops The Citadel, Anthony Edwards scores 29 Anthony Edwards having fun, but Tom Crean expects more Tom Crean wants more control against The Citadel RELATED: Anthony Edwards draws standing ovation in opener Georgia basketball strikes exhibition gold vs. Charlotte 49ers Sahvir Wheeler hidden star, directs point after first exhibition Anthony Edwards lives up to hype in exhibition opener Georgia freshman already making basketball history The post Georgia basketball forward Rayshaun Hammonds breakthrough' wrecked Georgia Tech appeared first on DawgNation.
  • ATHENS Georgia basketball has made it a historical start to the season with Wednesday night's 82-78 win over rival Georgia Tech. It was the Bulldogs' fifth-straight win in the series, the first time that has happened in 79 years, and the 10,205 fans at Stegeman Coliseum couldn't have been more happy. 'This is a huge rivalry,' Georgia coach Tom Crean said. 'I said to the team, there are gong to be things in life that are so much bigger than you, and a game like this is one of them. 'When those seniors can say they never lost those games, that's a big deal.' Junior Rayshaun Hammonds carried the load for the Bulldogs (4-0), matching his season high with 26 points while pulling down 9 rebounds against the Yellow Jackets (2-1). Projected NBA lottery pick Anthony Edwards had 18 points and 8 rebounds, and senior grad-transfer Donnell Gresham Jr. had 13 points and 6 rebounds. Edwards, of course, made history by scoring 53 points in his first two games, eclipsing the freshman record previously held by Georgia and NBA Great Dominique Wilkins (1979). Michael Devoe had 34 points including a last-second, half-court shot to lead Georgia Tech. The Yellow Jackets opened the Nov. 5 with an 82-81 overtime road win over North Carolina State. Hammonds dominated the first half, scoring 19 of his points through the first 20 minutes. It carried into the second half with Georgia leading by as many as 16 points. 'It's a big win for us,' Hammonds said. 'I haven't lost to them, I don't want to lose to them.' A degree of uncertainty crept into the building with 10:15 remaining, however, when Hammonds picked up his fourth foul while scrambling for a loose ball. Hammonds took his 26 points and 8 rebounds to the bench, and Crean and the Bulldogs turned to freshman Anthony 'Antman' Edwards. Edwards, 1-of-8 shooting to that point with 5 points, drained a 3-pointer on the next trip down to make it 59-48 a the 9:41 mark. It triggered a 10-2 run that Edwards capped with a drive to the basket that made it 66-50. 'We did a good job on Edwards, he made some big plays late,' Georgia Tech coach Josh Pastner said. 'He's a pro, he's going to be one of the top 3 draft picks, pros do that.' The Bulldogs had used a 13-2 run to end the first half and take control of what had been a back-and-forth first half, leading 35-27 intermission. Edwards had just 2 points at the half, and he didn't score his first field goal until hitting a long jumper that made it 42-31 with 17:50 left. The Bulldogs fans came to life, and it was another big crowd. Georgia, in fact, has the second-largest season attendance in school history through four games (35,152), approaching the record set in 1981 when Stegeman Coliseum held 11,200 and drew 38,741 through its first four games. More history will be made when Georgia returns to action at 2:30 p.m. next Monday in the Maui Invitational against Dayton (TV: ESPN2). The Bulldogs, making their first-ever appearance in the prestigious will play again on Tuesday (Michigan State or Virginia Tech) and Wednesday (TBD). DawgNation Georgia basketball coverage Georgia overwhelms Delaware State, Rayshaun Hammonds stars UGA drops The Citadel, Anthony Edwards scores 29 Anthony Edwards having fun, but Tom Crean expects more Tom Crean wants more control against The Citadel RELATED: Anthony Edwards draws standing ovation in opener Georgia basketball strikes exhibition gold vs. Charlotte 49ers Sahvir Wheeler hidden star, directs point after first exhibition Anthony Edwards lives up to hype in exhibition opener Georgia freshman already making basketball history The post Georgia basketball off to historic start, dumps Georgia Tech 82-78 appeared first on DawgNation.
  • ATHENS Georgia stars have made the short list for two of the most prestigious awards in college football, the Outland Trophy and the Nagurski Award. Junior left tackle Andrew Thomas was named one of six semifinalists for the Outland Trophy, which recognizes the top interior lineman on offense or defense. Outland Trophy semifinalists OT Andrew Thomas, Georgia OC Tyler Biadasz, Wisconsin DT Derrick Brown, Auburn OT Penei Sewell, Oregon OG John Simpson, Clemson OT Tristan Wirfs, Iowa. Reed, a senior safety, is one of five finalists for the Nagurksi Award, which recognizes the best defensive player in college football. SS J.R. Reed, Georgia DT Derrick Brown, Auburn LB Isaiah Simmons, Clemson DB Antoine Winfield Jr., Minnesota DE Chase Young, Ohio State Georgia DawgNation stories Kirby Smart reveals redshirt plan for Georgia senior defensive lineman WATCH: Gus Malzahn says Auburn 'stuffed' Georgia in 4th quarter WATCH: Georgia QB Jake Fromm says offense must get better Georgia in select company, clinches third-straight SEC East Division title UGA stock report: Bulldogs cash in at Auburn with 21-14 win Georgia game ball, punter Jake Camarda kept Tigers backed up Brian Herrien, Jake Fromm pray for injured UGA photographer The post Georgia stars Andrew Thomas, J.R. Reed semifinalists for Outland Trophy, Nagurski Award appeared first on DawgNation.