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Dawgs on TV have produced some great memories for fans through the years
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Dawgs on TV have produced some great memories for fans through the years

Dawgs on TV have produced some great memories for fans through the years

Dawgs on TV have produced some great memories for fans through the years

Like many of you, I have watched repeats of various SEC football games from recent years over the past couple of weeks, what with spring sports sidelined by the pandemic. In fact, I've even having resorted sampling a couple of Wake Forest games on the ACC Network to get a look at transfer quarterback Jamie Newman.

Even though it's mostly repeats and old documentaries on the SEC Network and its ESPN parent right now, I've still been struck by how spoiled today's UGA fans are when it comes to seeing the Dawgs on television.

Those of us following the Bulldogs in the 1960s, '70s and even the early '80s can remember when getting to see Georgia play on TV was a big deal, something that didn't happen all that often.

Nowadays, all of the Dawgs' games are televised, even the cupcakes, but, through the '90s and even into the early 2000s, that wasn't the case.

Still, the last time less than half the Bulldogs' schedule was televised was 1993, when we got to see only five games. And five games seemed a lot at the time.

Incredibly, during the national championship season of 1980, Herschel Walker and the Dawgs were on TV only three times: the South Carolina matchup with George Rogers, the Florida game, and the Sugar Bowl win over Notre Dame. No wonder Larry Munson's radio broadcasts were so important to us.

Actually, I clearly can recall the very first time UGA was seen playing football on TV. It was New Year's Day, 1960, and Wally Butts' Bulldogs, led by QB Fran Tarkenton, were set to play Missouri in the Orange Bowl. I awoke that morning with both sides of my face ballooned out with a terrible case of the mumps, but my 7-year-old self was determined not to miss the game! Thankfully, Mom allowed it, propping me up with pillows to see Georgia take a 14-0 win.

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Dawgs on TV have produced some great memories for fans through the years

The next time the Dawgs were on TV was the following fall, when Georgia's 21-6 loss to Alabama in Birmingham became the first regular-season Georgia football game to be televised and, in fact, the first college football game ever televised by ABC Sports.

The Bulldogs weren't on the tube again until Vince Dooley wound up his first season at the helm, with 7-0 win over Texas Tech in the Sun Bowl.

The fact that Georgia rarely appeared on TV in those days wasn't unusual. Back then, the game of the week was literally the game of the week! I remember what a major event it was when ABC came to Athens to televise the 1965 season opener against national champion Alabama. There's no doubt that the Dawgs' flea-flicker upset win being televised to the entire nation was a big leg up for Dooley in returning the Georgia program to national relevance.

I was in 8 th grade at the time, and attended the game with my Dad, so I didn't see the telecast, but 12-year-old Darrell Huckaby watched it on TV at his home. After the Dawgs won, he ran out his back door and turned down the alley toward the house where future Bulldogs player Craig Hertwig lived. "We leaped into one another's arms, like in one of those old movies," he recalled.

Beginning in the late 1960s, and lasting until the mid-70s, Georgia usually only had two or three regular-season games on TV each year.

An eye-opener for many younger fans is that the Georgia-Florida game in Jacksonville, now an automatic addition to the CBS schedule, wasn't televised at all until ABC gave it a regional slot (as opposed to national) in 1967. It would be another 20 years before the clash between the Dawgs and Gators started being televised every year.

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Dawgs on TV have produced some great memories for fans through the years

A little-remembered Dawgs TV footnote is that, in 1981-82, Georgia's games were taped for delayed replay Sunday nights on Channel 5 and Monday nights on cable's USA Network. Longtime Atlanta sportscaster (and UGA grad) Bill Hartman called those games, with folks like Lewis Grizzard, Buck Belue and longtime high school coach Butch Clifton doing the color. "It was all about Herschel," Hartman told me this week. "Once he left Georgia, the production stopped."

Things started looking up in 1984, when Ted Turner's SuperStation signed an SEC football deal. That year, half a dozen Georgia games were televised, and that was about par for the course through the rest of the '80s.

We gradually started seeing more games televised as CBS, ABC and Turner were joined by Fox, the nascent ESPN (which showed its first UGA game in 1984) and various regional syndicators like Jefferson-Pilot/Raycom. Local Atlanta stations even televised games occasionally.

There also were a few cupcake games shown on pay-per-view. That included one game in 2004, the first season that all of Georgia's games were on TV in one way or another.

An ESPN syndication package, originally called the SEC Network (later SEC TV), joined the fray in 2009, and all of Georgia's football games have been televised nationally or regionally ever since then. SEC TV was replaced in 2014 by today's 24-hour SEC Network.

Looking back over 60 years of Bulldogs football on television, many high points come to mind. Asked to name their favorite Georgia game on TV, a lot of fans automatically say the 1981 Sugar Bowl against the Fighting Irish.

Frankly, I think viewers who weren't fans of either school probably found that 17-10 Georgia win a bit of a snore. My longtime friend Ben Anderson conceded that it was "not the most dramatic of games with a lot of twists and turns," but he made the valid point that it still "was a national title game with a one-possession final score."

The other great TV game that quickly comes to mind is the thrilling double-overtime 2018 Rose Bowl win over Oklahoma. Many believe that one is Georgia's greatest game ever and its back-and-forth nature made it great television, too.

Another fan favorite is the 1971 Thanksgiving night comeback win over Georgia Tech engineered by Athens' Andy Johnson, televised nationally by ABC.

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Dawgs on TV have produced some great memories for fans through the years

A much less remembered game, treasured by Jeff Dantzler of the Bulldogs radio network as an "underrated doozy," is Georgia's 1982 visit to Starkvegas for a 29-22 win over Mississippi State. "Herschel was tremendous," recalled Dantzler, who watched the regional CBS telecast as a boy from his home in Statesboro.

Another TV game that stands out in the memories of fans who came of age in the '90s is No. 12-ranked Georgia's 28-27 upset of 6 th -ranked LSU in Baton Rouge in 1998. The Dawgs' freshman quarterback, Quincy Carter, had a great night, completing 27 of 34 passes for 318 yards, catching a pass for 36 yards and rushing for 41 more. Three-way player Champ Bailey, who was in for 96 of the game's plays, caught 7 passes for 114 yards, and fellow defensive back Kirby Smart had a team-high 12 tackles. Clinging to a 1-point lead, the Dawgs' final, clock-killing drive of the fourth quarter, highlighted by a key third-down reception by Bailey, was gripping viewing.

And, certainly a TV classic was the New Year's Day 2000 Outback Bowl, billed as "the first sporting event of the millennium," which saw Carter lead the Dawgs in an amazing comeback against the Purdue Boilermakers, who had future NFL star Drew Brees at QB.

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Dawgs on TV have produced some great memories for fans through the years

Brees set or tied six Outback Bowl records in the game, including passing for 378 yards, and, early in the second quarter, Purdue had a 25-0 lead over Jim Donnan's Dawgs. Things looked bleak. Terrence Edwards finally put the Dawgs on the scoreboard with a 74-yard scoring run, and it was all Georgia from that point on, with an 8-yard Carter-to- Randy McMichael TD pass tying the game with 1:19 remaining. After the Boilermakers missed a field goal in overtime, Georgia placekicker Hap Hines made a 21-yard kick for the win. At the time, it was the largest comeback in bowl history. Now, that's great television.

When ESPN televised Georgia's visit to Tuscaloosa in 2007, I watched it on a big-screen TV with my two brothers, my daughter and one of my nieces. We wanted to hear how the Scott Howard-Eric Zeier broadcast team did in their debut without Munson, so we muted the sound on the TV and instead listened to the Bulldogs radio broadcast while watching. The last time previously where all three King brothers had watched Georgia on TV together was the 1999 game against Tech, an overtime affair that didn't turn out well. So, when this one also went to overtime, we were more than a bit nervous. Thank goodness, Matthew Stafford and Mikey Henderson were as cool as could be, though. After Bama kicked a field goal in OT, Stafford threw a perfect strike to Henderson for the one-and-done winning score. That's the last time the Dawgs have beaten the Tide to date.

Another fan favorite from the 2007 season is the 42-30 win over Florida that saw most of the Georgia team celebrating the Dawgs' first score by dancing in the end zone. There was a lot more to the game, of course, with Knowshon Moreno running for 188 yards and 3 TDs, and the Dawgs defense sacking Gators QB Tim Tebow 6 times. But the "Gator Stomp" is what fans remember most.

Other fan TV favorites include the 1996 win over Auburn (Georgia was terrible in the first half, but the second half and four overtimes were great viewing); and the 2007 Auburn "Blackout" game, with CBS' Verne Lundquist and Gary Danielson dancing along to Soulja Boy in the booth.

However, the most frequently mentioned choice as the greatest Bulldogs TV game is known by two words: "Run, Lindsay."

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Dawgs on TV have produced some great memories for fans through the years

The 1980 Jacksonville clash saw the Dawgs trailing 21-20 in the fourth quarter, facing third-and-long at their own 7-yard line. Backed up in his own end zone, quarterback Buck Belue found receiver Lindsay Scott at the 25-yard line. Urged on by Munson on the radio, Scott scored the game-winning touchdown.

That game was playing on TV during Clint Ard's 21 st birthday party, and, he said, when Scott scored, "my whole family exploded with joy. It was one of the greatest birthday presents I've ever received!"

Jason Hasty, now the sports archivist at UGA's Hargrett Library, was just 5 years old at the time, but his favorite memory of watching the Dawgs on TV is looking up from playing with his toys to see his quiet church secretary mother on her feet as Munson shouted "Run, Lindsay!" on the radio. Hasty still prefers a radio soundtrack for TV games. "When I'm not in Sanford Stadium, the TV will be on with the sound turned down and the radio broadcast turned up," he said.

Mark Symms, meanwhile, was a UGA student watching that Florida game at the Alpha Gamma Rho house in Athens. After Scott's touchdown, Symms said, he and his drunken fraternity brothers ran out the front door and straight into Milledge Avenue, bringing traffic to a complete halt as they jumped up and down, screaming.

A police officer, who had no idea what they were celebrating, got them out of the street and wrote Symms a ticket for "rioting."

The brothers continued their celebration safely on the sidewalk for a few more minutes, when the cop suddenly returned.

"I am really in trouble," Symms thought, but the officer grabbed the ticket and tore it up. "He glared at me again, then winked. He had heard the news. He walks back to the car and says, Stay out of the damn streets. Go Dawgs!"

As Symms put it: "Greatest UGA TV game ever."

The post Dawgs on TV have produced some great memories for fans through the years appeared first on DawgNation.

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Local News

  • The Hall County Sheriff’s Office says there have now been four arrests after a fight that led to multiple stabbings at a park in Hall County. Investigators say none of the injuries were life-threatening.  There are drug and weapons charges for two men arrested in Habersham County: the Habersham County Sheriff’s Office says 22 year-old Jonathan Norton and 28 year-old Cody Bennett were caught trafficking in methamphetamine. They were booked into the Habersham County jail.  The GBI is investigating in Dawsonville after an inmate is found dead in the Dawson County jail. The investigation continues in Chatsworth, where an 11 year-old girl was killed, apparently mauled to death by dogs. 
  • Cole Wilcox was off to one heck of a start to his sophomore season at Georgia. After an abrupt end, the right-handed pitcher may have played his final collegiate game, the result of the COVID-19 pandemic, as the Major League Baseball draft approaches. Well, Wilcox may have played in last game for the Bulldogs. Such is life in these days. After he went 3-0 record with a 1.57 ERA, Georgia’s season was canceled after 18 games. Wilcox had struck out 32 and walked only two over 33 innings. There were high hopes for Georgia to return to the College World Series. Now, the focus must be on the draft. The MLB draft will be held June 10-11 and will be limited to five rounds, down from 40. That is where the uncertainty comes in for Wilcox, who is projected to be a late first-round pick. He has not committed to turning professional. “I don’t know yet,” Wilcox said Tuesday in a video conference call with reporters. “That is something that I probably won’t know until after the draft is over because that’s how it works, teams keep their business to themselves. It’s kind of a guessing game. Whatever happens, happens. I look at it as a win-win. “Obviously I love the university for the two years I was there, two of the best years of my life, not only with baseball but my experience and growth as a person. And then on the other side of it, you have something that is going to fulfill a lifelong dream. Either way, I look at it as a win-win, for sure.” The draft begins Wednesday of next week with the first round, 37 picks in total. Rounds 2-5 will be held the next day, with a total of 160 players being selected. Wilcox is rated No. 23 in the MLB prospect rankings. It’s likely the Wilcox will be drafted early, along with teammate right-handed pitcher Emerson Hancock, rated No. 4. Georgia was 14-4 before the season ended. Among Wilcox’s victory was a shutout of Georgia Tech on Feb. 29, when the 6-foot-5 pitcher threw seven innings and allowed three hits while striking out 11 and walking none. “I got off to a good start, and I feel like I was just starting to scratch the surface,” Wilcox said.  In two seasons at Georgia, Wilcox went 6-2 with a 3.38 ERA in 23 appearances. He struck out 96 and walked 40 for his career and was an All-SEC selection as a freshman. If Wilcox is to move on, he will leave memories, some of the best of his young life, behind. “It affected all of us, in I feel like, the same way,” Wilcox said of the shortened season. “We knew we had a special team, a special group. We had good bonds throughout the whole team, and that’s what was so special about it. The season ending like that cuts out two and half months of memories out of your life, really, that you could be out there playing with your teammates, traveling on the road, going to different places.  “Looking back at last year, that was something that were the best memories of my life, traveling to Mississippi State, going to Hoover (Ala.) for the SEC Tournament. Stuff like that is just tough, and you are really going to miss, and you know that you’ll never play with those guys again.” This would be the second time Wilcox has been drafted. Coming out of high school in Chickamauga, he made his intentions known that he intended to play college baseball. Still, Washington selected him in the 37th round. Wilcox said it will help this time around knowing what to expect. Wilcox said he has been in contact with several major league teams. He remained in Athens for much of the hiatus, working out at an available gym. He has kept a throwing regimen not throwing off a mound but ready to ramp up if and when the time is right. When and where is still to be determined.
  • Five members of the OLLI@UGA program were recognized for outstanding service and contributions at the organization’s annual meeting May 28. Recipients of the Carol Fisher Award, OLLI’s highest honor, are Lee Albright, Andy Horne and Penny Oldfather. The President’s Award, which recognizes special projects benefitting OLLI, was presented to Peter Balsamo and John Muthe.  The awards were presented by Chris Jones, whose term as OLLI president ends June 30. Jones announced the recipients in the OLLI annual meeting held via Zoom due to coronavirus restrictions. The Fisher Award is named for a deceased former professor in the University of Georgia’s Mary Francis Early College of Education who was instrumental in starting the Learning in Retirement program, which evolved into OLLI@UGA. The award recognizes outstanding service over a long period of time.   Albright was OLLI president in 2016-17 and served on numerous committees including the search committee that selected the current OLLI executive director. As chair of the Hospitality Committee she led planning for many social events, the annual meeting, the OLLI Fair and the New Member Orientation. She represented OLLI at several national and regional meetings of lifelong learning organizations.  Horne, retired former dean of the education college, was instrumental in transitioning the Learning in Retirement program into the national OLLI network founded by the Osher Lifelong Learning Institute. He was vice president of the OLLI Board of Directors, a member of three Nominating Committees, and as co-chair of the Curriculum Committee helped arrange dozens of classes.  Oldfather served six years on the Curriculum Committee, recruiting instructors for hundreds of classes and advocating for greater diversity in class offerings. A retired professor in the College of Education, she is beginning her second term on the Board of Directors and is co-chair of the committee that arranges luncheon programs.    Balsamo and Muthe received the President’s Award for their leadership in helping OLLI initiate use of Zoom for classes and meetings. As a member of the Curriculum Committee, Balsamo arranged OLLI’s first remote classes via Skype about two years ago. He has since recruited numerous instructors at distant locations to teach via Skype and more recently via Zoom. He also helped start the WiseMEN Special Interest Group, which brings male OLLI members together for discussions. Muthe lives at Iris Place retirement center and was responsible for starting OLLI Zoom classes at the center. He manages the technology that enables about 25 residents who have joined OLLI to attend the classes. He has taught some classes and also helped start the WiseMEN group. He uses his technology skills to help Iris Place residents with their camera phones and to make phone check-ins with them.  
  • As a four-year starter on the University of Georgia men’s basketball team from 1988-91, Rod Cole was known as a versatile fighter on the court. Sliding back and forth from guard to forward, Cole was the go-to player when positions needed to be filled.    His ability to make decisions in high-pressure situations helped lead the Bulldogs to back-to-back NCAA tournaments for the first time in school history. Now the owner of Above All—a cleaning and restoration company—Cole is using his and his business’ versatility to help fight a much bigger adversary—the coronavirus, or COVID-19.    Above All specializes in indoor air quality, a component essential to combating the virus. Cole says joining in the fight against COVID-19 was “right up their alley.” Even so, the company has experienced many changes due to the virus.    The company has had to turn its attention to sanitation – Above All uses the disinfectant Noroxycdiff – rather than only remediation. To do so effectively, Cole brings in individuals to train his staff.    “I want my guys knowledgeable about what they’re doing and why they’re doing it,” Cole said. “Knowing the right protocols and ways to do these things are in the best interest of everyone.”   For Cole and his team, some of the biggest adjustments are simply in the day-to-day routine in treating facilities. Cole describes his and his team’s new uniform as the type of thing one would see on TV. Along with their respirators, Above All workers wear full Tyvex suits with shoe coverings and sealed hoods, and their hands are double-gloved and tied at the wrists.   “It’s not normal for people to put on PPE (personal protective equipment) and suits like that,” Cole said. “For one, that stuff is hot. Then, by nature, we want to jump out of the truck and shake each other’s hands; you can’t do that now. The stuff that used to be normal can’t be right now, so I think that is probably the biggest shift my guys and I have had to make.”     Cole likens operating Above All to sports, how athletes adjust to changes on the field much like he did on the Georgia basketball court.    “Athletes have that ability to not only view the physical but to think,” Cole said. “They process data very quickly, because things come at them even quicker. They’re forced to adjust to those [changes] and move. That process isn’t just a physical one; it’s a thought process, too. Business is the same way. There are a lot of obstacles to face, but there are ways to adjust.”   While the pandemic has required Cole and his company to make major changes, this is not the first time Above All has been faced with business-altering obstacles.    Cole began his business nearly two decades ago as a cleaning service primarily for large hotels. However, the aftermath of 9/11 included a near standstill in travel which forced hotels to cut back on things such as cleaning services.    From there, Cole’s business shifted its attention to water damage. He acknowledges the importance of this business decision.   “Over the years, I’ve learned to diversify,” Cole said. “You learn a lot from the mistakes you make [and] a lot through trial and error. Sports taught me how to deal with adversity. At that point, unfortunately, a lot of people lost their way of living [and] threw their hands up, right away, at the stress of it. I try to look at the positive, and I try not to get down. I tell myself that if 90 percent of the world is looking at it [negatively], I need to look at it [positively].”    Many of Above All’s business clienteles include colleges and commercial businesses. When colleges shifted to online instruction and shelter-in-place orders went into effect, work for Above All slowed down a bit.    However, Cole remains optimistic things will begin to pick up as businesses begin to reopen. Above All has picked up new business in retirement homes and more, and Cole is excited for his company’s plans in the future.    Cole encourages the student-athletes – seniors in particular – whose seasons were cut short due to the pandemic to harness the strength they have to refocus on the positives.   “It’s really difficult, and no individual is the same or has the same thought process,” Cole said. “We’re all faced with hardships in sports, work [and] life in general. Something I’ve always appreciated about athletes and military people is they have been pushed to the limit. Athletes have coaches who push them to their physical limits. When you get older, you just have to realize you can refocus all that strength you had as an athlete – the ability to push yourself, physically, to the limit – harness that mentally and know you can move forward if you try.” 
  • Madison County High School makes plans for an in-person graduation ceremony, which had been postponed from May because of coronavirus: it will be held June 20 at the Madison County High School football stadium in Danielsville.  Franklin County’s in-person graduation will be held on the same Saturday.  Other area high schools, including both high schools in Oconee County, have talked about holding in-person graduation exercises, possibly in July. 

Bulldog News

  • ATHENS Hutson Mason admits he was as surprised as anyone last week when news dropped that former Southern Cal quarterback J.T. Daniels intended to transfer to Georgia. 'I wasn't so much surprised he chose Georgia (over Tennessee and Michigan), I was more so surprised that Georgia wasn't looking for another quarterback,' Mason, a former Bulldogs' quarterback, told DawgNation. 'Kirby is in an interesting spot with Jake Fromm gone . ' Interesting, for sure. Quarterback Derby The Bulldogs return 80 percent of the production off a championship caliber defense while reloading on the other side of the football with offensive gurus Todd Monken and Matt Luke. Daniels, should he be granted a waiver for immediate eligibility, would jump into a five-man quarterback derby. WATCH: USC beat writer shares inside info on JT Daniels Wake Forest graduate transfer Jamie Newman appears to be the favorite to start, but there's also D'Wan Mathis (redshirt freshman), Carson Beck (freshman) and Stetson Bennett (redshirt junior). Mason said he doesn't think UGA's tentative offensive blueprint would need to drastically change course with Daniels under center. USC has also run a Pro Style version of the spread with RPO concepts. 'One of the things I was surprised by when I was watching tape on him, he's far more nimble and shifty and elusive in the picket than I thought,' Mason said. 'I think he's far more athletic than Jake . 'That was the first thing that stuck out to me. I would see a clip where the pocket collapsed and would normally be a sack or a negative play last year for Jake, and for me, he gets out of. He turns what should be a sack into a 4-yard pickup, or he extends the play and makes something out of nothing.' Questionable Knee Mason said as much as he liked on tape, there's a question if Daniels will possess the same mobility if he's playing in a knee brace after suffering a torn ACL in last season's opening game. 'I don't know if he will be the same in the pocket and escape a lot of things because that knee brace is extremely restrictive on quarterbacks,' Mason said. 'I tried to wear one because a lot of offensive coordinators in college have the theory that they want their quarterback to wear one to protect their knee from the blind side.' Quarterback injuries have become more common as the speed of the game has increased and more teams have spread the field. Mason, himself, has experience attempting to play in a precautionary knee brace. 'I tried fiddling around with it a coupe springs, and I was like 'I hate this,' it's like a peg leg, you literally feel like you have one leg,' Mason said. 'So that that was my concern if he's coming off that knee injury and he has to wear a knee brace, will he ever be the nimble guy in the pocket that I saw on tape?' First Look Mason, who quarterbacked Georgia to a 10-3 record in 2014 and now provides analysts on Atlanta's WCNN-AM 680 'The Fan,' went directly to the archives upon hearing Daniels was heading to Athens. Hearing about a player is one thing, but seeing him and evaluating him in game action, is another. Mason provided a video breakdown of Daniels on Twitter last week. @GeorgiaFootball adds another 5 QB in JT Daniels. The more tape I watch of him the more impressed I become. pic.twitter.com/yEgWPkLdqH Hutson Mason (@HMason14) May 29, 2020 'I believe the two most important traits are accuracy and tight windows, that's why I chose that clip,' Mason said. 'And, it was functional arm strength. A lot of people think arm strength is how far can you throw the ball in a straight line, and that'a a huge misconception. 'It's more of when the pocket collapses, and you have a messy pocket, with somebody at your feet and you can't step into the throw, do you still have enough functional arm strength to get the ball down the field?' NCAA Waiver It has yet to be determined if Daniels will be seen on the field this season, as the will need the NCAA to grant him a waiver for immediate eligibility similar to the one Miami's Tate Martell received when leaving Ohio State. 'I'm sure Kirby's pitch was, We are a quarterback position away from being a national champion,' that's what I believe Kirby's pitch to him was,' Mason said. 'That's pretty enticing. 'I think the program is selling itself, and that was probably more of the angle. But I was surprised, because it seems like, man,'how much more room do you have for quarterbacks?' Time will tell. Georgia players have started arriving back on campus with voluntary workouts set to begin next Monday. DawgNation JT Daniels stories Georgia getting accurate, cerebral' quarterback in JT Daniels Addition of JT Daniels continues UGA inroads into California Breaking down the angles of JT Daniels' addition Details emerge on USC transfer JT Daniels Kirby Smart addresses new normal routine for players The post WATCH: First look at new Georgia quarterback JT Daniels from Hutson Mason appeared first on DawgNation.
  • ATHENS Georgia baseball pitcher Cole Wilcox is playing the waiting game and a poker game of sorts while waiting on the Major League Baseball Draft. Wilcox, like fellow UGA pitcher Emerson Hancock, is a projected first-round pick who is eligible for the draft (June 10-11). Like Hancock, he has not committed to leaving Georgia if selected. RELATED: Star pitcher Emerson Hancock undecided on 2020 MLB Draft 'I don't know yet,' Wilcox said on a Tuesday Zoom call with UGA media. 'That's something I probably won't know until after the draft is over, because that's kind of how it works. 'Teams keep their business to themselves. It's kind of a guessing game at this point. Whatever happens, happens.' Listening to the 6-foot-5, 232-pound sophomore talk on Tuesday, it became evident he's planning on launching his professional baseball career after the draft. Even then, more unknowns await him. While Major League Baseball is still trying to iron out a plan to restart the season, there have been indications the Minor League Baseball seasons will be canceled. Wilcox was 3-0 in four starts with a 1.57 ERA in 23 innings with 32 strikeouts and only two walks when the season was halted amid the COVID-19 pandemic on March 12. The Chickamauga, Ga., product said he tries not to think about professional baseball's plight. Though, he does factor it into a workout regimen that's designed to help him get even stronger while keep his arm fresh and loose. 'If we were in season I'd have just finished the (NCAA) regionals, so I'd be in game shape, I'd be throwing 7 or 8 innings, 120 pitches,' Wilcox said. Instead, Wilcox said, 'I'm throwing, just not off the mound or anything. No bullpen, no long toss, nothing super taxing, just keeping my arm in good enough shape for when it is time to ramp it back up.' Wilcox has a 100 mph fastball as evidenced in the Tweet below, along with the power and stamina that had Major League Baseball teams calling his number throughout the past two seasons. Hey @DSeifertD1PBR I finally got a good #HeatSheet Alert for you: here's @BaseballUGA freshman righty Cole Wilcox blowing away Jacob Olson on a 100 mph heater. Sat mostly 98-99 with a couple 88 mph sliders in a 1-2-3 5th, also fanned Luke Berryhill on 99. pic.twitter.com/aHmdlKlIxz Aaron Fitt (@aaronfitt) March 16, 2019 'I've spoken with a good majority of the teams, they come meet with us in the fall, and you build relationships with them,' Wilcox said. 'They stay in pretty good contact throughout the season. It's kind of hit and miss, you don't really know how to take all the calls and stuff. 'I've stayed in pretty good contact with a lot of teams in all areas of the draft. It's hard to tell interest at this point and what they are thinking right now.' Wilcox has been widely projected in the first half of the 37-man first round, but a Tuesday ESPN pay site article projects Wilcox as the No. 23 overall pick. According to the ESPN story, Wilcox is 'A first-round talent in the 2018 prep class who hasn't progressed much in college; he's still throwing up to 100 mph to go with an above-average slider and changeup.' Wilcox said he feels he has matured and grown stronger since high school while experiencing some of the best times of his life with his Georgia teammates. The Bulldogs were ranked No. 2 when the season came to a premature end. 'We knew we had a special team and a special group, we had good bonds throughout the whole team, that was what was so special about it,' Wilcox said. 'Last year, that was some of the best memories of my life, being able to travel to Mississippi State, and go to Hoover for the SEC Tournament, you're really going to miss it when you'll never play with that group again 'I feel like I was just kind of scratching the surface.' But still, having some fun along the way, needing nine takes before releasing this diving board, trick shot video on his Twitter account: For pitchers everywhere pic.twitter.com/NHkoE859zF Cole Wilcox (@ColeWilcox11) June 1, 2020 The post Georgia pitcher Cole Wilcox: 2020 MLB Draft still a guessing game' appeared first on DawgNation.
  • Former Auburn coach Pat Dye, who took over a downtrodden football program in 1981 and turned it into a Southeastern Conference power, died Monday. He was 80. Lee County Coroner Bill Harris said Dye died at a hospice care facility in Auburn from complications of kidney and liver failure. Dye, who played college football at Georgia, had been hospitalized in Atlanta last month with a kidney issue. He had tested positive for the coronavirus.  The news was first reported by 247Sports. » MORE: Notable sports deaths in 2020 Dye was born in Blythe, Ga. He was team captain of the 1956 Class AAA champion Richmond Academy in Augusta. He went on to play from 1957-1960 at Georgia where he was a two-time All-American, under head coach Wally Butts. When Dye came to Auburn, he inherited a program that was deeply divided after only three winning seasons in the previous six years. In 12 years, he posted a 99-39-4 record, Auburn won or shared four conference titles and the Tigers were ranked in The Associated Press’ Top 10 five times. Dye’s overall coaching record was 153-62-5 in 17 years at Auburn, Wyoming and East Carolina. His coaching career ended in November 1992 when he was forced to resign after a pay-for-play scandal rocked the program, which was placed on two years’ probation. Dye served as athletic director as well as coach for most of his career with Auburn. He remained associated with the university after his resignation and was a frequent commentator on football talk-radio shows. He was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame in 2005.  Dye is survived by four children — including Pat Dye Jr., an NFL agent — and nine grandchildren.
  • Longtime Auburn coach Pat Dye has died. He was 80. Dye, who played college football at Georgia, had been hospitalized in Atlanta last month with a kidney issue. He had tested positive for the coronavirus.  The news was first reported by 247Sports. Dye was born in Blythe, Ga. He was team captain of the 1956 Class AAA champion Richmond Academy in Augusta. He went on to play from 1957-1960 at Georgia where he was a two-time All-American, under head coach Wally Butts. Dye, a three-time SEC coach of the year, coached the Tigers to a 99-39-4 record in 12 seasons from 1981 to 1992. He was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame in 2005. Before coaching at Auburn, Dye coached at Alabama, East Carolina and Wyoming. Dye is survived by four children — including Pat Dye Jr., an NFL agent — and nine grandchildren.
  • Tony Grimes included four teams in the long-awaited cutdown of his top four schools on Sunday afternoon. At this time, it looks like his choice is down to four schools: Georgia. North Carolina. Ohio State. Texas A&M. Final 4 @dhglover @Bubblesdnf @Giavanni_Ruffin @RivalsFriedman @BrianDohn247 @DemetricDWarren pic.twitter.com/oiINaCKm3U Tony Grimes (@757EliteDB) May 31, 2020 Grimes released that quartet of options via his Twitter account. He still has established a plan to make his college commitment on December 1, 2020. @Hayesfawcett3 pic.twitter.com/o63R0RlvwG Tony Grimes (@757EliteDB) May 31, 2020 The 6-foot-1, 180-pound senior from Princess Anne School in Virginia Beach rates as the nation's No. 1 CB and the No. 7 overall prospect for 2021 on the 247Sports Composite ratings. If you're looking for a quick refresh on all things Grimes, this DawgNation deep-drive profile will define his worth as a young man first and his abilities as a lockdown cornerback second. Grimes has been rated as the top of the board for months now on the weekly DawgNation 'Before the Hedges' program which airs every Wednesday on our Facebook and YouTube social channels. The 5-star prospect had planned to visit Georgia several times over the last few months prior to the global pandemic which sidelined all on-campus recruiting travel. That NCAA ban for both unofficial and official visits has since been extended to July 31. That decision was made by the NCAA over the last week. Grimes had only recently decided to start conducting the weekly zoom and recruiting contact calls he had been making over the last month during the coronavirus epidemic. He had taken a break from that activity. He had visits planned to see UGA in March, April and an official visit was already on the books for June 12. His father, Deon Glover, described an ascending interest level for the family in Georgia at that time. 'We've been to enough schools to say Hey if push came to shove and we need to make a decision now we can make a decision now' and we've been to enough schools multiple times to be able to say that,' Glover said. 'At least with the schools we like. We've been multiple times. With the exception of Georgia.' There is a clear interest here in Kirby Smart's program. 'What's going on at Georgia is elite mimic energy that you see in Clemson and some of the other top programs,' Glover said earlier this month. 'With the program itself. We learned a lot when we were down there the first time and of course, we were going to go back this time in March and go back again in April.' 'We had an official visit set up for June 12. We had put the gas in there with Georgia. Trying to get as much as we can about Georgia in a short period of time. But with those other schools, we have already got enough information on them. For real.' Check out the junior highlight reel for the Under Armour All-American selection below. Did you know the weekly DawgNation.com 'Before the Hedges' program is now available as an Apple podcast? Click to check it out and download. DAWGNATION RECRUITING (the recent reads on DawgNation.com) BREAKING: All-American OL Dylan Fairchild has made his college decision Brock Vandagriff: How does that family feel about the JT Daniels transfer? The JT Daniels to Georgia buzz seems very real BREAKING: Elite 2022 DB Marquis Groves-Killebrew commits to UGA Who is Chaz Chambliss? Carrollton staff shares the goods on the new Bulldog commit BREAKING: Chaz Chambliss commits to Georgia football Taking a deep dive at how well Georgia has been recruiting Metro Atlanta of late Elite 2022 defensive athlete Daniel Martin already has a 'family' feel at UGA Brock Bowers: Nation's No. 3 TE knows what he needs to do before his college decision De'Jahn Warren: The 'nugget' for the nation's No. 1 JUCO prospect with UGA Decrypting that recent tweet from 5-star LB Smael Mondon Jr. Prince Kollie: The ILB target who had 1,085 yards as a receiver in 2019 Lovasea Carroll: DawgNation goes one-on-one with the 2021 RB commit The post BREAKING: Nation's No. 1 CB Tony Grimes includes UGA in his final four appeared first on DawgNation.