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Departing Georgia football star: ‘too early for people to freak out’
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Departing Georgia football star: ‘too early for people to freak out’

Departing Georgia football star: ‘too early for people to freak out’

Departing Georgia football star: ‘too early for people to freak out’

Georgia Football-UMass-Game time-Tv Channel-week 12

ATHENS — Departing Georgia football tight end and newest Detroit Lion chuckled when asked what to make of Jake Fromm’s off-day in the G-Day Game.

The implication was clear: Not much.

Fromm was 14-of-29 passing for 116 yards with a touchdown and early Pick-6 that consisted of cornerback Eric Stokes wrestling the ball away from receiver J.J. Holloman.

Fromm chastised himself in the postgame, saying he didn’t “play up to the standard” that he holds himself to.

Nauta, one of many former or outgoing players in attendance, was quick to put everything into perspective.

“I think the biggest thing to remember is you’ve been practicing against each other for two months, running the same plays,” Nauta said. “The defense knows what we’re running, we know what they are running.”

And so days like Fromm’s happen, even to the best of them, which Fromm figures to be this upcoming season.

Coach Kirby Smart has expressed concerns with the receiving corps.

UGA does lose four of its top five receivers from a season ago, including the reliable Nauta.

But the departing tight end says fans can relax and have faith in Smart and the Bulldogs’ system.

“The reality is it’s still early in the offseason and there’s a whole summer to get better and get guys on the same page,” Nauta said. “It’s way too early for people to freak out.”

Especially since Georgia fans didn’t really see what the Bulldogs’ offense is going to look like.

“A lot gets held back, you talk to any coach in the country, they want to keep it simple and not show their hand,” Nauta said. “They know everybody will watch that game to see what they are doing.”

As for Fromm, Nauta said the self-criticism the UGA quarterback has for himself is genuine, and part of the reason he’s so successful.

“Jake is a guy that is ultra-competitive, and he wants 100 percent completions and three touchdown passes in every game, and he always wants the offense to perform well,” Nauta said. “You look at it, he didn’t really play bad, but anytime he’s out there he holds himself to high standards.

“He’s going to be hard on himself, because that’s the guy he is.”

The post Departing Georgia football star: ‘too early for people to freak out’ appeared first on DawgNation.

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Local News

  • The Corps of Engineers says the West Bank Day Use Park and the Sawnee Campground on Lake Lanier will remain closed through the Memorial Day holiday weekend. The Corps is still working to repair damage from flooding earlier this spring.    The Sawnee Campground at Buford Dam is scheduled to reopen next month. Lake Lanier is expected to be extra busy through the Memorial Day weekend.
  • UGA opened Legion Pool Thursday: the Athens-Clarke County Leisure Services Department says its pools open for the summer swim season tomorrow. The pools will be open through the first weekend of August.  From the Athens-Clarke County Government website… All ACC Leisure Services pools open Saturday, May 25 for the season. Memorial Day pool hours are 1:00 – 5:30 p.m. Pools close for the season Sunday, August 3. During the aquatics season, pools are open Tuesday-Friday and Sundays, 1:00 – 5:30 p.m. Pool hours are noon – 5:30 p.m. on Saturdays. The Bishop Park pool is open to the public on weekends, only. All pools are closed on Mondays for maintenance.Pool admission is $1 per person (cash only). Individual pool passes are available for $20 and a Family Pass (for up to four) costs $40. Passes may be purchased, cash only, at any department pool.ACC Leisure Services operates five public pools including Bishop Park, 705 Sunset Drive; East Athens Community Center, 400 McKinley Drive; Lay Park, 297 Hoyt Street; Memorial Park, 293 Gran Ellen Drive; and Rocksprings Park, 291 Henderson Extension. 
  • Tag offices around Georgia—including the Athens-Clarke County Tag Office on Lexington Road—are closed again today while the state upgrades its computer system. The offices will also be closed for Monday’s Memorial Day holiday and will reopen next Tuesday. Volunteers are wanted for a Saturday cleanup in Athens: they will gather at 9 o’clock tomorrow morning for about three hours of work in Trail Creek Park.  The Jefferson City Council signs off on plans for a facility for the Jackson County Humane Society and its new shelter. It is slated for construction on 31 acres off Martin Luther King Junior Drive in Jefferson.  The City Council in Winder approves a $6 million funding package for projects designed enhance the Jackson Street corridor in downtown Winder. There’s also money for upgrades to Jug Tavern Park in Winder, and the city’s new public works facility. The Winder City Council is looking to give final approval to a $17.4 million budget.  There is federal money for the airport in Canon: the Franklin-Hart Regional Airport is getting $2 million to help with an ongoing airport renovation project.
  • A steady stream of Hoschton residents filed into a rented hall next to City Hall Wednesday to fill out paperwork they hope will force Mayor Theresa Kenerly and Councilman Jim Cleveland out of office.   The chairs of the Jackson County Republican Party and the Jackson County Democratic Party joined forces in assisting residents in filling out complaints. The forms claim the two officials’ racially charged remarks subjected the town to public ridicule and violated city ordinances for behavior in office as well as state non-discrimination laws. The bipartisan effort is the latest attempt to ratchet up pressure on Kenerly and Cleveland following an Atlanta Journal-Constitution investigation into comments the mayor reportedly made during a search for a new city administrator. According to city documents and accounts by two members of the City Council, Kenerly said she withheld the application for one finalist “because he is black, and the city isn’t ready for this.”   Then, in an interview with the AJC, Cleveland defended the mayor’s comments and made matters worse by volunteering his opinion that interracial marriages were against his Christian upbringing. “I have black friends, I hired black people. But when it comes to all this stuff you see on TV, when you see blacks and whites together, it makes my blood boil because that’s just not the way a Christian is supposed to live,” the councilman said. In a subsequent interview, Cleveland walked those comments back a bit, saying they represented how he used to think and that he was much more tolerant now. However, he said he does believe interracial relationships “can create problems.” The words were hurtful to residents Anthony and Erica Osula, a biracial couple with two children, ages 10 months and 5, who were among those filing ethics complaints. “It touched me,” Anthony Osula said as his wife fought back tears. Kenerly and Cleveland’s comments “don’t have a place in our society,” he said. Keith Henry, the finalist who was the subject of Kenerly’s alleged remarks, has hired an Atlanta attorney and is working on filing a complaint with the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, a required first step if he intends to sue the city. Henry, who works as the assistant city manager in suburban Houston, Texas, said he received an unexpected call from the mayor on May 11, after the controversy drew national attention. “I immediately informed her that I could not speak to her without my counsel present,” he said. Henry said Kenerly apologized to him but said she was acting in the “best interests” of the city. “It was brief. She kept it simple,” he said. “I’m sure it wasn’t advisable that she gave me a call.” Kenerly did not return a phone call from the AJC seeking comment. Previously, she has denied making prejudiced comments but has refused to answer questions about the incident or why, a week later, she apologized to the council in a private meeting. Councilwoman Hope Weeks said the mayor’s denials are disturbing because Kenerly repeated the comments about Henry to her personally. The controversy comes at a critical time for Hoschton, which is in the midst of a massive residential building boom. According to new estimates from the U.S. Census Bureau, Hoschton is the third fastest-growing city in Georgia, with a 2018 population of 1,916, a 15 percent increase over the previous year. So far, Kenerly and Cleveland have resisted all calls to step down, despite criticism from a wide number of organizations including the NAACP, the North Georgia Conference of the United Methodist Church, and the Georgia Legislative Black Caucus. On Wednesday, the Washington, D.C.,-based International City/County Management Association added its voice to the mix. ICMA is a century-old professional association for non-elected government workers which sets best practices for how government officials should behave. “Our job is to serve all people, notwithstanding racial background,” Executive Director Marc Ott said. “That should have been the entire basis of their decision in Hoschton rather than selecting a city manager or city administrator in this way.” Ott, who earlier in his career was the first African-American city manager of Austin, Texas, said the Hoschton story reminded him of an experience he had as he was building his career and was told that an elected official refused to hire him because he is black. “I can understand how he is feeling,” Ott said of Henry. “Things change, but they haven’t changed enough. What happened in Hoschton is an example.” Ott said his organization stands ready to help Hoschton move ahead with its understanding of how diverse leadership can improve government for its citizens.
  • Seventh-ranked Georgia ran its winning streak to six by defeating fifth-ranked Arkansas 3-1 Thursday to advance to the semifinals of the SEC Tournament at the Hoover Met.   With their latest win, the Bulldogs (44-14) earned an off day Friday and will face the Arkansas-Ole Miss winner in the semifinals Saturday at noon on the SEC Network. The Razorbacks (41-16) play the 22nd-ranked Rebels in an elimination game Friday.    Georgia erased a 1-0 deficit in the seventh when redshirt freshman Connor Tate delivered a pinch-hit run-scoring double. In the eighth, junior Patrick Sullivan came through with a two-out, two-run double to put Georgia in front. Junior Aaron Schunk ignited the rally with a leadoff double off Jacob Kostyshock. After two outs, the Razorbacks elected to intentionally walk Cam Shepherd. Sullivan stepped up and lifted a sinking liner to left that Christian Franklin couldn’t make a play on and it landed fair and kicked into foul territory, allowing Schunk and Shepherd to score.   Arkansas ace Isaiah Campbell pitched five scoreless frames before giving way to Kole Ramage in the sixth. Bulldog freshman Cole Wilcox provided 6.1 innings, allowing one unearned run on three hits with four walks and five strikeouts before Georgia went to its bullpen.   Georgia had its first scoring opportunity in the second, loading the bases with two outs on singles by John Cable and Shane Marshall and a walk to Cam Shepherd. However, Campbell came back to retire Chaney Rogers to keep it a scoreless contest. In the third, Georgia stranded a pair in scoring position after Arkansas had taken a 1-0 lead on an unearned run courtesy of a passed ball.   Sophomore left-hander Ryan Webb (1-0) came in and promptly got Christian Franklin to bounce into a double play. Webb picked up his first win of the year, pitching 2.1 scoreless innings with three strikeouts. In the ninth, Webb got the first two outs before allowing a single. Georgia looked to Schunk, After allowing one hit, he came back to strike out Jacob Nesbit for his 12th save and 19th for the staff. Schunk is 12-for-13 in saves opportunities this year. Kotsyschok dropped to 1-3.   Georgia will be making its first appearance in the SEC Tournament semifinals since 2011.   Dawg Tracks *Junior SS Cam Shepherd (7 games), graduate DH John Cable (5 games) and freshman C Shane Marshall (4 games) extended hitting streaks Thursday. *Junior RHP/3B Aaron Schunk registered his 12th save of the year and 20th of his career. *Georgia has reached the semifinals of the SEC Tournament for the first time since 2011,   Coaches CornerIke Cousins Head Baseball Coach Scott StricklinOn the game... It was a well-played game by both teams and the starting pitchers did a good job. Connor Tate gave us some life with another big pinch-hit RBI-double and Patrick Sullivan had a huge at bat to give the lead. Those two hits gave us some momentum, and our bullpen took over. That’s the best Ryan Webb has been, and that’s a good sign because we lost him for about six weeks during the season. He didn’t’ want to come out, and we went to Aaron Schunk and he closed it out. ”   Player’s PerspectivePatrick SullivanOn his two-run double… 'The pitcher had a lot of run on his ball, and I just had to find a way to find a hole, and it did. When I hit it, I wasn’t sure if he was going to get to it. I’ll take it.” Up Next Georgia will play either Arkansas or Ole Miss in the SEC Tournament semifinal Saturday at noon on the SEC Network.  

Bulldog News

  • ST. SIMONS ISLAND — Georgia football is way ahead of the game when it comes to bringing in money for 2019. The Bulldogs already had collected $33 million in ticket revenue as of April this year as compared to $21.4 million by the same time last year, according to the 2019 treasurer’s report. That report was given to the Georgia Athletic Association’s board of directors at the annual end-of-year retreat, which is being held this year here at the King & Prince Resort. That increase is attributed to having a seventh home game this season as well as last year’s ticket price increases, according to board treasurer Ryan Nesbit. Georgia reports $29.6 million in actual ticket contributions, which exceeded the budgeted amount of $28.5 million. Expenses will also be up slightly to $5.3 because of the extra game and an ever-expanding support base. “When you have home games with Notre Dame and Texas A&M, that helps,” UGA President Jere Morehead said. “Our athletic fundraising has been exceptional this year, so I want to commend Greg McGarity and (director of development) Matt Borman and everybody involved,” President Jere Morehead said told the board during his report to open the meeting. Georgia did not reveal its budget for the coming fiscal year, but it is expected to set another record. That has been the case in each year since the advent of the SEC Network bolstered the league’s revenue distribution program. League members received an average of $43.1 million from the SEC in the revenue distribution, which divides profits equally between the 14 members plus the conference headquarters in Birmingham. Last year, the board raised Georgia’s average football ticket price from $50 to an average of $66.42 per game, on a two-tiered system. Games against Tier 1 opponents such as SEC and Power 5 opponents cost $75 per game. Games against Tier 2 opponents are $55 per game. That does not include the required donation for the right to purchase those tickets. Georgia’s budget was more than $143 million last year. It’s expected to approach $150 million this year when it is presented to the board for approval during Friday’s meeting. The Bulldogs approved the architects for its football facility expansion but provided few details beyond it will be started as soon as possible. Morehead used a portion of his opening marks to congratulate McGarity, Georgia’s athletic director, and his administration “for a fantastic year whether it be fundraising or on the competitive field of play.” “We’re continuing to see a great deal of success and accomplishment on and off the field,” Morehead said. The board responded with applause, which is unusual for these proceedings. Seventeen out of UGA’s 21 sports competed in NCAA postseason play this year. That includes baseball, men’s golf and track and field, which are currently active in postseason play. McGarity received a $25,000 raise last year to a salary of $700,000. He has chosen to work on year-to-year contracts going forward. Fifty-six percent of 511 student-athletes recorded a GPA of 3.0 or better in spring semester, according to faculty athletics rep Craig Shipley. That’s below the athletic department’s stated goal of 65 percent but above the national average. Twenty-seven athletes recorded a perfect 4.0 GPA. Men’s cross country led all sports with a 3.44 GPA. Georgia Athletic Association’s is called to order moments before conducting its final meeting of the 2019 Academic Year in the Retreat Room at the King & Prince Resort on St. Simons Island. (Chip Towers/DawgNation)   The post Georgia football is raking in revenue at record rate for 2019 season appeared first on DawgNation.
  • MACON — As the marquee outside the Hargray Capitol Theatre boldly stated to passers by on Second Street, it was the Kirby Smart and Tom Crean Show here on Monday. The Georgia Bulldogs Club’s annual Coaches Caravan made its first stop here in Central Georgia Monday night and it was a quick one. Smart spoke for 7½ minutes and Crean for about twice that before a gathering of a couple or few hundred fans. There was no question-and-answer opportunity for the fans, which typically produces the most entertaining exchanges. No salvos were sent back Florida’s way. Before the program, the coaches did give the local press and team beat writers about 10 minutes for a Q&A backstage. After that, the coaches and an entourage of officers from UGA’s development office led by director Matt Borman adjourned for a private dinner with donors. The group will repeat the process Tuesday night in Augusta. Then that will be it for a while. There was very little in the way of hard news that came out of the session. The most pertinent was that all Bulldogs, current and incoming, are expected to meet academic eligibility requirements. That’s particularly refreshing considering Georgia had “a number of guys” who were sweating out spring semester grades, according to Smart. Other nuggets to come out of the 90-minute affair: Smart said no players other than linebacker Jaden Hunter are currently in the transfer portal. “None that I can think of,” Smart said. Smart congratulated Vince Dooley and praised the university for naming the field after him. “Who better to do it for than for a man who gave his life to the university and did a great job,” Smart said. We’re probably not going to see a lot more of outside linebacker Walter Grant at running back. “A lot of it will depend on the freshmen coming in, Kenny (McIntosh), and other guys at the position and how we feel, and outside ‘backer depth, too,” Smart said. “It was an insurance policy at best. It was kind of a research project to see what he can do.” Crean said he remains in constant contact with sophomore Nicolas Claxton as he works out for NBA scouts and he attended all his events at the NBA combine last week. He interjected that Claxton “could be a lottery pick” if he returned. Crean also said that he expects to sign another player before next season. Headlines from Coaches Caravan QB Jake Fromm will have more ‘offensive input’ in 2019 Kirby Smart expects all players, incoming and otherwise, to be eligible RB Zamir White on pace to be cleared for preseason camp Georgia fans flock to Macon landmark to hear from Kirby Smart           The post VIDEO: Kirby Smart, Tom Crean update fans on Georgia Bulldogs during ‘Coaches Caravan’ appeared first on DawgNation.
  • CORAL GABLES, Fla. — Incoming Miami grad-transfer receiver Lawrence Cager had the unique experience of getting to know both Kirby Smart and Mark Richt as head coaches the past few years. Smart has elevated Georgia football into an annual national championship contender in his three years leading the program. RELATED: Kirby Smart ‘proud’ to have worked for Mark Richt The Bulldogs played in the College Football Playoff Championship Game after he 2017 season, and narrowly missed making the CFP last season in controversial fashion. Smart coached a season under Richt at Georgia in 2005 and inherited a program on solid footing in 2016. WATCH: Mark Richt praised by rivals Saban, Spurrier, Fulmer Richt was was 145-51 over his 15 seasons at Georgia, his .740 winning percentage second only to Smart’s .762 (32-10). The differences in the disposition of Richt and Smart, Cager indicted, are like fire and ice. “Kirby was an All-SEC performer, so he can relate to you and he’s a player’s coach, he’s a guy you want to play under,” Cager said. “He gets fired up, just like coach (James) Coley.” Coley is the offensive coordinator at Georgia under Smart. But on the front end of Cager’s career, he recruited against his current boss, back when Smart was the defensive coordinator at Alabama. Cager began his career at Miami in 2015 with Coley calling the plays under then-Hurricanes’ head coach Al Golden. But then Golden was fired midway through the season, and Richt took over the Miami after being let go from Georgia following he 2015 season and returned to his alma mater to coach the Hurricanes from 2016-2018. Cager said Richt was much more reserved than what he’s seen from Smart. “With Coach Richt it was like, ‘We’re here to do this and that and handle business,’ ” Cager said. “It wasn’t like, ‘Let’s turn it up!’ Kirby will say ‘Let’s turn it up on them!’ “Coach Richt was more like, ‘Look, we are coming here, it’s Florida State, we know what we have to do, we need to line up and beat them.” Cager said the 43-year-old Smart is personable and comes across as being more invested emotionally than the 59-year-old Richt, who delivered messages in businesslike, matter-of-fact tone. Miami hired Richt to replace Golden after Cager’s freshman season. Cager said most of the players on the Miami football team had a pretty good idea Richt would be the Hurricanes next head coach. “Once Georgia let go of Coach Richt, this is his alma mater and his name kept coming up so we all thought we will hire him,” Cager said. “Once we heard it was us or Virginia, we knew for sure.” Richt changed the culture immediately, Cager said. “Golden came in here from Temple, he was more laid back,” Cager said. “Richt changed everything. We used to wear anything we wanted to practice, but then Coach Richt came in and wanted everyone uniform. It was old school, everyone would look the same, no earrings, the little stuff. “It helped a lot of people in the end. He’s a great guy. We were focused on winning championships, but his mentality was we are here to bring the swag back and it’s all about business.” Now it’s Cager who is all about business. The 6-foot-5, 218-pound receiver is expected to challenge for a starting spot immediately in the Bulldogs’ young receiving corps. DawgNation in South Florida Kenny McIntosh draws comparisons to Sony Michel, Jordan Scarlett Lawrence Cager eager for Georgia touch down ’The Blueprint,’ championship plans for South Florida star The post Fire and ice: Incoming Miami transfer compares Kirby Smart to Mark Richt appeared first on DawgNation.
  • MACON — Jake Fromm grew up and played high school ball 19 miles from the famous Hargray Capitol Theatre in downtown Macon where Kirby Smart was Monday. Fromm’s mother, Lee, works as a nurse in the Coliseum Medical Center, just a mile away across the Ocmulgee River. The Fromm’s family hunting lease is just 19 miles the other side of the hospital over in Plum Creek. So Jake Fromm is a big deal around. Then again, Fromm is pretty much a big deal everywhere these days. So Smart, here to speak at a small gathering of Georgia fans and Georgia Bulldogs Club members, dutifully acknowledged his quarterback and the many other Central Georgia players who dot the Bulldogs’ roster. “We’ve gotten a lot good players from here,” Smart said at the opening of his brief remarks before a crowd of a few hundred. “The guy who takes a snap from center and the guy who snaps it.” Fromm, obviously, is the player who takes the snaps. Trey Hill, who was Fromm’s teammate at Houston County High in Warner Robins, is the center snapping the ball to him. Hill played left tackle most of the time in high school, but did have occasion to snap to Fromm every once in a while. But now he’s the one replacement on Georgia’s heralded offensive line. He must replace graduated senior and NFL draft pick Lamont Gaillard. About that, there’s some question. About Fromm, there is none. The 6-foot-2, 225-pound junior is considered a All-America candidate and Heisman Trophy as the Bulldogs head into their fourth season under Smart, once again as a Top 5 team. Fromm does so having played in every game, starting all but one and in position to set the school’s all-time record for completion percentage. This year, Fromm will be operating under a new offensive coordinator. James Coley succeeded Jim Chaney in the role after taking over as quarterbacks coach last year. Smart thinks that is a good thing. “I think we’ve got some more quarterback guys around him with Coley working with him and he’s excited about that,” Smart said. “For him, it’s been a transition through the coordinator position where he’s kind of a sponge, he’s got more of an opinion now. He understands what we’re trying to do offensively.” Fromm has completed 64.8 percent of his passes for 5,364 yards with 54 touchdowns and 13 interceptions at this point. The thought is the Bulldogs will throw the ball more under Coley, who did that as coordinator at Miami and Florida State. Smart believes Fromm can handle whatever Coley can dish out, and will also have a say-so on what the Bulldogs do as well. “Any time you’ve got a three-year starter,he can give you input on things he likes about the offense, things he dislikes and things he thinks he can be successful,” Smart said. “That input is helpful, it’s always helpful.” The post Kirby Smart expects QB Jake Fromm to have more ‘offensive input’ in 2019 appeared first on DawgNation.
  • MACON —  The biggest applause Kirby Smart got during his 7½-minute speech to a couple of hundred Georgia fans on Monday was when he said that every player slated to return for the Bulldogs had retained their academic eligibility. Smart had said essentially the same thing backstage earlier with regard to the 10 signees in the Class of 2019 that have yet to report to campus. Specifically, there has been a lot of concern and chatter about 5-star wide receiver George Pickens. But while the Georgia coach didn’t address Pickens specifically, he did say he expected all who signed to show up and be eligible when they arrive this summer. Most are expected to arrive at the end of this month and enroll for summer semester, which begins in early June. “We’ve got full expectations that everybody will be there in the summer to practice, to compete,” Smart said. “All of those guys are finishing up, right now they’re in their finals depending on what state they’re in or where they are. I know they’re looking forward to getting into our place and start working.” As for the returning players, Smart acknowledged that the Bulldogs were sweating out the spring semester grades of a more than a few. But, again, he said, there were no academic casualties. “And that’s an accomplishment,” Smart said as applause nearly drowned out his remarks. “As everybody in this room knows, academically at Georgia, it’s an unbelievable place. It’s unbelievably competitive. When you look at the average student coming in with a 32 ACT, a 1,300 SAT, a 4.1 GPA, you know when you walk into the classroom you’ve got to be at the top of your game. And that goes for our players, too.”   The post Kirby Smart says all returning players, all incoming recruits have made the grades to play appeared first on DawgNation.