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Latest glimpse of Bulldogs at G-Day leaves us longing for more this fall
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Latest glimpse of Bulldogs at G-Day leaves us longing for more this fall

Latest glimpse of Bulldogs at G-Day leaves us longing for more this fall

Latest glimpse of Bulldogs at G-Day leaves us longing for more this fall

UGA football-Justin Fields-G Day 2018-Georgia Bulldogs

ATHENS — And now, we wait.

G-Day and spring practice is in the books for the Georgia Bulldogs. And while that’s probably a good thing for those 100-plus players and coaches who have been going at it pretty hard the last five weeks, that’s not necessarily a great thing for the Bulldog Nation, who based on what I’ve gathered, can’t see and hear enough about coach Kirby Smart’s program.

As of Monday, it is exactly 100 days until Georgia’s opens preseason camp. It will be 131 days before Georgia kicks off the 2018 season against Austin Peay. That may seem like a long time, but it really will be here before you know it.

Do not fear, for we here at DawgNation have lots of plans to keep your football appetites sated as we entire football purgatory. And SEC Football Media Days will be here before you know it, too.

In the meantime, I wanted to put a bow on spring football and G-Day with some final observations. Post your comments and questions below and I’ll be sure to reply just as soon as I can.

Justin Fields and the quarterbacks

I’m going to go out on a limb here. I don’t think we’ll ever see Justin Fields get sacked 7 times in a game in his career, not at Georgia and not when he’s playing in the NFL in a few years.

That’s what they had down for him on the stat sheet Saturday from G-Day. The Red defense was credited for bringing down Fields 7 times for minus-41 yards. Of course, the scrimmage was conducted under non-contact rules for the quarterbacks, and referees were instructed to be quick on their whistles. And they were, as the 11 combined sacks of the quarterbacks will attest.

I went through a replay of the game, and if I had to guess how many of those plays would have resulted in actual sacks of Fields, I’d put it at one, maybe two. Fields was never blindsided and anticipated all the pressure he incurred. A couple of the sacks were basically one-handed touches and, at 6-foot-3, 225 pounds, I don’t see Fields going down with many one-handed grasps. One time he got swallowed up inside the tackles with nowhere to go, another time he ran out of bounds for a short loss, which counts as a sack. Conversely, Fields had a long run of 22 yards and might’ve gone a while longer on that run and one other.

Here’s another observation I made: Georgia didn’t exactly turn Fields loose. I’m not sure what the motivation was, but coaches just didn’t call any deep balls for him. He had 18 completions in the game (on 33 attempts) and they came primarily on checkdowns, slants, wide-receiver screens, quick outs, and dig routes. Retrospectively, that’s kind of disappointing because we’ve heard so much about Fields’ “cannon” arm. But he did show some nice touch, pocket awareness and instincts.

I may be wrong, but I think I saw him under center only twice. The rest of the time he operated out of the shotgun. But he did make the 15-yard touchdown pass to Matt Landers from under center and it was a well-placed ball on a deep fade. Great catch by Landers, too.

As for Fromm, it did look like he simply had a bit of an off day throwing the ball. The pick-6 by Deandre Baker was simply an overthrown ball on a short route to Mecole Hardman. His other interception, made by William Poole II, was a misread and shouldn’t have been thrown. But Poole made a nice play on the ball.

Wide receivers will be just fine

My cohort Brandon Adams and I differ a little bit on this observation, but I think Georgia’s wide receivers will be just fine.

Yes, there were more drops than you’d like to see in any contest, but that’s really not that unusual for the spring. I expect this unit to be considerably more sharp come the fall. Also, the Bulldogs were economical in the use of their primary targets. Understandably, Terry Godwin spent most of the day on the sideline nursing what we’re told are minor groin and knee injuries. But Godwin should be 100 percent in short order, and when he is, he has proven to be one of the most reliable receivers in the SEC.

Meanwhile, Georgia didn’t target its other primary receivers very often on Saturday, either. Hardman had just 1 catch and Riley Ridley had 2. One of Ridley’s, you might note, was a 57-yard touchdown from Fromm. Ridley would’ve been credited with another 44-yard score — and thus 116 yards receiving overall — if he could have held on when his head slammed into the Sanford Stadium turf.

No, Saturday was mainly for Georgia’s offensive coaches to get a look at the less tried-and-true receivers. Ahkil Crumpton, the second-year transfer from California, led all receivers with 5 catches for 60 yards, and looked remarkably like Isaiah McKenzie with a 34-yard catch and run of Fields pass over the middle. Jeremiah Holloman also showed some flashes, finishing with 59 yards on 3 catches showing a knack for making tough catches in traffic. Freshman early enrollee Kearis Jackson had just 1 catch for 5 yards but created a lot of buzz in camp this spring and drew some oohs and aahs on a punt return he ran about 2o yards up the field to catch.

Senior Jayson Stanley was unable to run down a deep ball from Fromm on the first series but, unbeknownst to many, he’s actually one of the Bulldogs’ fastest players and, with some confidence, could prove to be a real threat this season. He had 4 catches for 30 yards. Meanwhile, the No. 1 offense threw the ball to backs Brian Herrien and Elijah Holyfield a lot. That’s something we can expect to see with D’Andre Swift in the fall. The sophomore tailback didn’t play because a groin pull.

Defense might surprise us

Lastly, I came away fairly impressed with Georgia’s defense. For the game, the Black team was considered the No. 1 defense. But one must keep in mind that these forces will be joined in the fall, and the combination therein looks like a pretty good defense to me.

Most of Smart’s concern coming in was with the secondary and the defensive line. It was hard to tell much about the play of the defensive front, as there were very few straight rushing attempts. But the defensive backs overall played surprisingly well.

Poole’s interception came while playing the star position, and he actually switched sides to play for both teams. Added together, he finished with 3 tackles and a pass breakup in addition to the pick. Tyrique McGhee led the Black defense with 6 tackles. Eric Stokes, despite giving up the TD to Landers (he actually had good coverage) was impressive in man coverage and was credited with 2 pass breakups.

Considering as much as Georgia was putting up the ball — 81 times between the two teams Saturday — the defensive backs held up pretty well. They had 13 pass breakups and 4 interceptions.

The thing to remember about the 2018 Bulldogs is they remain a work in progress. Seventeen more freshmen from the No. 1-ranked recruiting class in America will join the team for summer workouts the first of June. There are a lot of players Georgia’s coaches are eager to see out of that group, including cornerback Tyson Campbell, guard Jamaree Salyer, linebacker Quay Walker and punter Jake Camarda. You can bet some of those guys will figure prominently into Georgia’s fall plans.

For now, we’re left to speculate about all that — for a while. We’ll just have to enjoy doing that over the next 100 days.

The post Latest glimpse of Bulldogs at G-Day leaves us longing for more this fall appeared first on DawgNation.

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Local News

  • The Georgia House Rural Development Council, created by the House to find ways to boost rural Geiorgia's economic fortunes, is looking to encourage multi-county industrial partnerships. Committe co-chair State Rep. Terry England says that came out of a meeting in Elberton this week. He notes one such authority covering several counties east of Atlanta attracted a Facebook data center this year. He says this would particularly benefit smaller counties without the resources to land such an economic plum. He says those counties would share the cost of building industrial parks-and then share the revenue. The Council plans more meetings and will report recommendations back to state lawmakers by year's end. 
  • Colorado State football coach Mike Bobo released a statement after news broke of his hospitalization due to numbness in his feet. In his statement released on Twitter, Bobo said he was thankful for the support he and his family have received while he’s undergone testing is looking forward to the upcoming football season. “I am currently in the process of a multiple day treatment for a peripheral neuropathy, and continue to be encouraged by the results of the ongoing medical testing,” Bobo said in part. “While I’ve been hospitalized, I have been able to remain in close contact with our staff and watch practice film in preparation for our season opener against Hawaii.” Colorado State released a statement Monday from Bobo and Colorado State athletic director Joe Parker which announced Bobo was hospitalized after a Rams scrimmage Saturday and then admitted to a hospital to undergo further testing after consulting doctors. A former Georgia quarterback, Bobo coached at the University of Georgia under Mark Richt as the quarterbacks coach from 2001-2006 and offensive coordinator from 2007-2014. In three seasons at Colorado, Bobo holds a 21-18 record.
  • Did you miss all the rain, thunderstorms and risk of severe weather? Well, it’s all expected to return Friday, whether you missed it or not.    It’ll also set the precedent going forward for the weekend and beginning of next week, Channel 2 Action News meteorologist Brad Nitz said. Friday morning should be free of rain, and drivers should only have to contend with some light fog, Nitz said.  However, storms should roll into North Georgia around 2 p.m., and those should run through the evening commute, potentially causing problems for drivers. “We're looking at isolated to scattered (storm) coverage through 5 p.m.,” Nitz said. “As they come in, they could pack a punch.”     The risk of isolated severe thunderstorms is mostly north of I-20 and includes most of North Georgia and eastern Georgia, Nitz said. The storms present the possibility of 60-mph winds, small hail, downpours and frequent lightning. The worst of the storms should be over before the Braves take on the Colorado Rockies at 7:35 p.m. at SunTrust Park.  Friday’s 60 percent chance of rain increases to 70 percent Saturday, Nitz said. The rain chance remains above 60 percent through Tuesday. The cloud cover should lower temperatures into the mid-80s Saturday and beyond, but the added humidity and moisture should thicken the air, increasing how hot it feels outside, Nitz said.
  • There are now indictments for two men from Madison County, charged in a deadly shooting in Athens: David and Martin Garcia are cousins, 22 and 18 years old, from Hull. They’re accused in the June 4 death of Saheed Snow, who was shot and killed on Nellie B Avenue in Athens. Athens-Clarke County Police say it was apparently a drug-related shooting.  There are now indictments for Jonathan Herbert: the 30 year-old former Gwinnett County school teacher was arrested last month in Hall County, accused of biting a 14 year-old girl in the buttocks while she swam in Lake Lanier on the Fourth of July. Herbert is facing criminal counts that include sexual battery and public intoxication.    A Dawson County man is indicted on charges stemming from allegations that he stole money from a baseball umpire’s association and used it to pay prostitutes: Timothy Ryan is 55 years old, from Dawsonville. 
  • Athens-Clarke County Police say gunshots that were fired into a home off Linda Avenue were apparently in retaliation to earlier shootings that happened on Oak Hill Drive and Pamela Drive in Athens. A suspect in those shootings—identified now as Johntavious King—was arrested and booked into the Clarke County jail earlier this week. The search for suspects in the most recent shooting was, at last report, ongoing. There have been no injuries in any of the shootings. 

Bulldog News

  • ATHENS — My debut for the Georgia football “ask the expert” feels very appropriate in that the subject matter in running backs. Of all the positions I’ve covered in college football, this is the one where I feel most qualified based on the fact I have covered some of the best running backs in SEC football history. While a journalism student in college I covered the Detroit Lions when Barry Sanders was the running back. Every handoff brought me to the edge of my seat in the Pontiac Silverdome, and I’ve only seen a few backs since then that can do that. Some of them I’ve had the good fortune of covering. The Stephen Davis-James Bostic duo on undefeated 1993 Auburn was special, and Shaun Alexander is the most talented running back in Alabama history in my opinion. The Jamal Lewis-Travis Henry-Travis Stephens trio at Tennessee was dynamic, and later, a Vols’ backfield with two 1,000-yard rushers in Gerald Riggs Jr. and Cedric Houston was among the most underrated. Arian Foster came along later for Tennessee, and you could see his talent his true freshman yea. I moved to the Michigan State beat in 2012 where Le’Veon Bell and Jeremy Langford were waiting to impress. My return to cover the Vols saw Jalen Hurd, Alvin Kamara and John Kelly sharing the backfield. They are all NFL talents, and I believe current UT back Ty Chandler could be special, too. Now, Georgia, and the first thing I did was look at the games last year and review the recruiting tape of Zamir White and “Little” James Cook. RELATED: Georgia LB raves about running back James Cook That brings us to today’s question:   @ChipTowersDN here’s one for you both.  With all the depth at running back, what are the chances of seeing more 2 back sets this year?  Saw it a few times last year, but not much. #keepemguessing — Michael McCollum (@mgmccollum) August 17, 2018   I’ll come right out and say it: Cook has captivated me from the time I saw his highlights. Not because of what he did — most all FBS backs are run away from the competition in high school. It’s where Cook did it. You don’t see guys run away that easily on the high school football field of South Florida. But there was Cook, electrifying and dazzling against future FBS players. Usually I put the videos at the bottom of the story, but you got to watch this — look at the change of direction and acceleration from Cook: James Cook High School Highlights Now you know why Monty Rice said: “I’ve never played against a running back like Cook before, he has his own little style, and it’s very unique.” Question is: What does Jim Chaney think? My guess is Georgia’s base offense will be single back, three-wide and one tight end. When two backs are in the game, I’d guess it would be in shot gun, and sometimes one might go in motion as a receiver. That’s what I saw on video from last year’s games, and it worked well. I could see Chaney doing it most often in passing situations or in the two-minute offense. D’Andre Swift looks strong and appears to be the starting back. Elijah Holyfield has had some camp moments, but I’m always somewhat skeptical of junior and senior backs having breakout years — seems their star would have already shined. But if you go with a second back, whether it’s Cook, Holyfield, Brian Herrien or White, who do you take off the field? RELATED: Kirby Smart explains why Georgia football offense personality still unsresolved Do you subtract a Demetris Robertson or Mecole Hardman? Because it sure looks to me like Riley Ridley is emerging as a go-to guy and Terry Godwin is proven. Ideally Cook will grow to be the same size as his big brother, 6-foot, 210-pound Dalvin Cook of the Minnesota Vikings. But for now, “Little” Cook — as Monty Rice calls him — is listed at 5-10, 190. Not big enough to be a three-down back in the SEC. I’m of the Alabama football mindset of utilizing bigger, stronger backs as primary ballcarriers. If anyone can appreciate that, it’s Georgia fans who have first-hand memories of the greatest SEC back of all time, Herschel Walker. So my answer isn’t as definitive as maybe you’d like, but hopefully it provides some perspective. Oh, and for those who wonder what I think of White, I’m reserving judgement until he gets that bulky knee brace off.       The post Georgia football likely to utilize 2-back formations in shot gun most often, but when and who? appeared first on DawgNation.
  • GEORGIA’S OWN #11: RB ZAMIR WHITE ATHENS — The term “freak” probably is overused in sports. But with regard to Georgia’s Zamir White, it suits him perfectly. And that goes beyond the Adonis-like body and size/speed combination White showed up with to UGA. No, White is a bit of a medical freak. It goes back to the very beginning with him. As detailed by DawgNation’s Jeff Sentell during White’s recruitment, doctors recommended White’s mother abort her pregnancy due to severe underdevelopment around the end of the first trimester. When he was born, the first 100 days of White’s life were spent in intensive care. As a newborn, White’s tiny body endured multiple surgeries. They had to address issues such as cleft lip, cleft jaw, kidney function, cysts, and other minor and major malformations. Initially, he was given 10 days to live. From his first breath, White was having to overcome adversity. But as all the world can see he turned out considerably better than “just fine.” “I’m really just happy he’s here,” said his mother, Shanee White. “It is not all this football stuff.” Zamir White has not missed a preseason snap despite wearing a significant metal brace to protect the right knee that required ACL surgery last December. (Steven Colquitt/UGA)       With that context, it’s easy to understand why White wasn’t about to let a little ol’ torn ACL slow down his development as the next great back to sign with Georgia. And he hasn’t. To cut to the chase, White will be available to play in the Bulldogs’ season opener against Austin Peay on Sept. 1. And word is, he would’ve been ready if that game had been played on August 1 as well. That’s when Georgia opened preseason camp, and White has been “full go” since the first whistle. The only thing limiting him is a somewhat cumbersome metal brace on his right knee. He longs for the day in the not-too-distant future when he’ll be able to play without it. “He could take the knee brace off and practice, but it’s precautionary,” Georgia coach Kirby Smart said after the Bulldogs’ first scrimmage of the preseason. “It’s a little rigid and it’s not comfortable for him. He’s not out there feeling like he’s his old self yet. … But he is cleared and he’s safe to practice. He just doesn’t like having that knee brace on.” That he’s already working out full speed with the Bulldogs does not make White a medical miracle. His timeline to recovery from a simple tear of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is not unusual in modern-day sports medicine. But White was fortunate to have been able to enlist Georgia in his treatment and recovery. White actually incurred the knee injury in a playoff game with Scotland High School on the night of Nov. 17 last fall. It came on his last carry in the fourth of quarter of game his team led by 25 points. White came out of the game knowing he’d taken a helmet blow to the knee, but didn’t realize he was seriously injured. White remained on the sideline the rest of the game and signed autographs for fans for at least a half-hour afterward in 30-degree temperatures. Then he went home and crashed inn advance of an early wake-up call for an unofficial recruiting trip to UGA. It was only after walking around Sanford Stadium and up and down the stands that White realized he might have more than a bruise. He mentioned it to Ron Courson, Georgia’s director of sports medicine, and a routine examination on the spot revealed that a ligament indeed was torn. A month later, surgery was performed by UGA doctors in Athens. As an early enrollee with the Bulldogs, White’s rehabilitation began in earnest upon his arrival on campus. White’s progress was evident in April during Georgia’s spring practices. By the end of them, he was already running full speed through position drills with the rest of the backs. He was held out of contact and any competitive scrimmage situations, but otherwise was getting in work and learning the offense. Fast forward to the summer, and a video was released by UGA of White high-kicking and hitting and moving in a Taekwondo workout in the Payne Athletic Center. It was on Aug. 2, the first official day of Georgia’s preseason camp, that Smart pronounced White “full go.” “I don’t know in this day and age you would say (White’s recovery) was quick,” Smart said. “I think he’s on schedule or a little ahead of schedule. He got injured last year in football season. It’s not a miracle he’s back going. He is pretty special when it comes to rehab, buying in, doing wrestling, doing karate. He does all these extra things like Nick (Chubb) did. That part — his effort and all the work — is incredible.” As a result, Georgia fans will get to see what all the fuss is about. And with White, there has been a lot of fuss made. That’s what happens when one is a consensus 5-star prospect and the No. 1-rated running back in high school. His numbers at his little school in Laurinburg, N.C., were ungodly — 2,086 yards and 34 TDs in 11 games as a senior and a gaudy per-carry average of 14.1 yards. White regularly draws comparisons to a couple of other great Georgia backs from small-town North Carolina, Todd Gurley of Tarboro and Tim Worley of Lumberton. Both of them wowed the masses with the Bulldogs and earned riches in the NFL. The thinking is that this young man who has come to be called “Zeus” is on a similar path. First, White will have to get through one of the most intense running back competitions in Georgia history, which is saying something. Sophomore D’Andre Swift is the heir apparent to succeed the last greats, Chubb and Sony Michel. Talented juniors Elijah Holyfield and Brian Herrien have been patiently biding their time and awaiting their opportunities. And fellow freshman signee James Cook, brother of Dalvin, has turned heads with his quickness and broken-field running. But White is thought to have all the characteristics Georgia looks for in great backs. He has the size and strength to punch the football into the A and B gaps of the defense while also possessing the speed get around the end and outrun defensive backs to paydirt. That script has yet to be written. But optimism abounds. The early chapters in the Book of Zeus certainly have been incredible, especially that first one. If White plays the way coaches and recruiting analysts expect, he’ll be another reason Georgia “Owns the East.” The post Own the East: Georgia’s Zamir White has been overcoming adversity from the start appeared first on DawgNation.
  • ATHENS — Georgia football coach Kirby Smart isn’t exactly sure how his offense is going to look from play to play this season right now. Smart, however, said he’ll have a better idea following the Bulldogs’ second scrimmage of fall camp on Saturday. “ Scrimmage two is kind of a defining moment,” Smart said this week. RELATED: Kirby Smart explains why Georgia offense a work in progress Georgia is loaded with talent across the board, but particularly at the skill positions where running backs, tight ends and receivers are vying for play calls. “You want your best players on the field, so if our best players on the field are four wideouts and no tight ends, we better have some good tackles and be able to block well because we don’t have edges,” Smart said. “But if our best players are tight ends, then we’ll have three of them out there. If our best are backs, we’ll have two of backs and maybe two receivers.” The intense competition playing out in fall camp will go a long way toward determine who is on the field. Once that’s determined, offensive coordinator Jim Chaney can play Dr. Frankenstein with the playbook, the Bulldogs’ operating behind a monstrous offensive line. RELATED: Georgia football 5-star receivers getting outplayed in practice “We’ve got a set of plays, our core belief that we always have, which is balance, being powerful, being able to run the ball at our will, not somebody else breaking our will,” Smart said. “[But] as far as having it formed by any shape or form, I don’t think we’ll have that until the two-deep is set on the offensive line and how the top 10 shake out and the alignment that we’re going to be able to work with this season. I don’t think that will play out until even after scrimmage two.” RELATED: Georgia gets receivers back on the field from injury Some questions were answered in the first scrimmage, both quarterbacks proving they can manage the huddle, and running backs breaking loose on substantial runs. But Smart wants to see who can do it consistently, and the second scrimmage will go a long ways toward determine how Georgia will open the season at 3:30 p.m. on Sept. 1 against FCS Austin Peay at Sanford Stadium. Georgia football Kirby Smart 8-16-18     The post Georgia football second scrimmage ‘defining moment’ in offensive evolution appeared first on DawgNation.
  • ATHENS — Georgia football true freshman James Cook opened eyes at the Bulldogs’ open practice on Aug. 4,  and apparently he has continued to excel through fall drills. RELATED: James Cook catches Kirby Smart’s eye at open practice Georgia linebacker Monty Rice made it clear on Thursday that he has been impressed with all of the backs, and particularly Cook. “I’ve never played against a running back like Cook before, he has his own little style, and it’s very unique,” Rice said. “He’s very tough to cover …   you can’t be looking at the quarterback when you cover him, or you’ll watch them complete the pass.” Rice has had an impressive offseason himself, making a team-high 14 tackles in the G-Day game to put himself in position to win a starting job. Rice said nothing has been determined at linebacker yet, himself working at both “Mike” and “Will.” From the sounds of it, Georgia offensive coordinator Jim Chaney will have a hard time sorting through the offensive weapons. RELATED: Kirby Smart explains offensive personality still evolving Elijah Holyfield tore through the first-team defense in the first scrimmage, and Rice said the defense is eager to atone in the upcoming second scrimmage on Saturday. “I don’t want to see Brian Herrien, Holyfield or [D’Andre] Swift run for 60 yards on a play, not against us,” Rice said. RELATED: Watch Elijah Holyfield run through first-team defense They’ve all impressed, Rice indicated. “Little Cook never stops running, he’s fast, I mean, just fast,” Rice said. “Then you’ve got Holyfield   Brian, Swift, Prather [Hudson], Zamir [White], there’s a bunch of them, and they are all pretty good.” Cook, 5-foot-11 and 190 pounds, is the younger brother of NFL tailback and former Florida State star Dalvin Cook. He was one of the last freshmen in the 2018 class to arrive on campus. RELATED: Kirby Smart confirms James Cook on campus Cook and the Georgia backs could find the going tougher on Saturday. “We just have to get better on our techniques,” Rice said, “and if we get our techniques right, we can prevent those big runs.” Georgia football LB Monty Rice The post WATCH: Georgia linebacker Monty Rice raves about ‘Little (James) Cook’ appeared first on DawgNation.
  • PRACTICE OBSERVATIONS ATHENS — It was another stifling hot day on Woodruff Practice Fields on Thursday as the Georgia Bulldogs conducted their 12th practice of preseason camp in full pads. Good thing for the hard-working, and always-running receivers that they welcomed two back to their number. Senior Terry Godwin and freshman Kearis Jackson, each were dressed out and going through position drills during the 15-minute media viewing period. Godwin, the Bulldogs’ leading returning receiver from last year, has been out for most of camp with what coach Kirby Smart has described as a “not too serious” knee injury. Jackson, an early enrollee who turned some heads last spring, has been battling a hamstring injury. While Georgia’s offense got back those two targets, they were missing one other one from the tight ends group. Luke Ford, a 6-foot-6, 252-pound true freshman from Carterville, Ill., was reportedly involved in a minor motorcyle accident Thursday morning, according to ugarivals.com. Ford was not seriously hurt but did suffer some sort of foot injury, the fan site reported. UGA has yet to confirm the report. Other observations: Redshirt freshman receiver Matt Landers seems to have added significant weight to his 6-foot-5 frame, though he’s still listed on the roster at 200 pounds. Landers also seems to have moved up in the rotation. Georgia’s defensive backs were really getting after it during position drills. Defensive coordinator and secondary coach Mel Tucker was having them work on moving toward the ball carrier even though engaged in a lock-down block by the wide receiver. It made for some great individual matchups, with freshman Otis Reese facing off against fellow freshman Tyson Campbell and senior Deandre Baker locking up with J.R. Reed. Cornerback Tyrique McGhee (broken foot) was still sidelined as expected. Freshman corner Divaad Wilson, who suffered a knee injury in the spring, continued to run on the side under the guidance of team trainers. Georgia continued to mix and match on the offensive line. Kirby Smart said Wednesday the Bulldogs are simply trying to identify the best fill-ins in the case of an injured starter. The top five still appears to be LT Andrew Thomas, LG Kendall Baker, C Lamont Gaillard, RG Ben Cleveland and RT Isaiah Wilson. Speaking of Wilson, the 6-7, 340-pound redshirt freshman from Brooklyn appears to have completely remade his body. More importantly, there have been no reports of him falling out of preseason workouts due to the heat, as was often the case a year ago. The post Practice report: Key wide receivers back on the field for Bulldogs appeared first on DawgNation.