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Rosters for G-Day released, black jerseys teased
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Rosters for G-Day released, black jerseys teased

Rosters for G-Day released, black jerseys teased

Rosters for G-Day released, black jerseys teased

Georgia football- G Day-2019 rosters

The rosters for the 2019 G-Day game have been released.

The first team offense, led by the likes of Jake Fromm and D’Andre Swift will be the red team. The black team will be led the first team defense. They will be wearing black jerseys as well. The likes of J.R. Reed, Monty Rice and Eric Stokes are all on the Black team.

Last year, Georgia also wore red and black jerseys for the G-Day game. Kickoff between the two sides is set for 2 p.m. ET on the SEC Network.

Best Georgia football stories from around DawgNation

The post Rosters for G-Day released, black jerseys teased appeared first on DawgNation.

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Local News

  • A public march for peace, justice, unity and equality is scheduled for Saturday afternoon in Elberton, organized by two Elbert County Comprehensive High School alumni and with the full support and participation of the Elberton Police Department. John T. Williams, a graduate of Morehouse College and now pro bono and community service coordinator for the Alston & Bird law firm in Atlanta, and Dre’Kevious Gibbs, a current Morehouse College student, applied for the permit with the City of Elberton for Saturday’s events. In a phone interview Wednesday, Gibbs told WSGC News the march will commence from the Blackwell Memorial Cultural Center at 4:30 p.m. and end at the Public Square, where at 5 p.m. speakers will include Pastor Kam McClary and Wausheka McClary from New Doves Creek Baptist Church, Pastor Jim McCollough from Elberton First United Methodist Church, high school Principal Jason Kouns, along with Williams and Gibbs. In addition to peace, justice, unity and equality, Gibbs said the march will honor the memory of George Floyd, who died while in custody of Minneapolis police last week, and promote the eradication of racism and police brutality in the U.S. He added that pre-packaged meals will be provided for all participants on the Square, and COVID-19 safety guidelines will be in effect, including social distancing and asking participants to wear CDC-approved protective masks. Elberton Police Chief Mark Welsh said Wednesday, as permit details were being finalized, the police department is in 100% support of the First Amendment right of freedom to assemble and appreciates the organizers’ efforts to involve local police in Saturday’s events, along with faith and community leaders. Welsh said while he does not expect any counterdemonstrations or other disruptive forces, Elberton police have made arrangements to protect all participants and members of the public during the festivities, which are expected to conclude at approximately 6 p.m. Saturday.
  • Georgia basketball sophomore Mike Peake has entered the NCAA transfer portal, according to multiple sources. The 6-foot-8, 220-pound Peake was a late addition to last year’s class, signing in August out of Blue Valley Northwest High School in Overland Park, Kans. Peake played in 24 of 32 games last season, including the final 12 contests, averaging 9 minutes per outing with 2.3 points and 2 rebounds. Peake scored a career-high 8 points in the season-opening game against Delaware State and pulled down a season-high 6 rebounds in a season high 23 minutes against South Carolina on Feb. 26. Peake’s departure brings the Bulldogs’ roster down to 13 scholarship players. Georgia added Virginia Tech graduate transfer center P.J. Horne last week. Horne, a 6-6, 225-pounder, averaged 7.6 points and 4.2 rebounds per game last season.
  • A growing number of Georgians approve of Gov. Brian Kemp’s decision to relax coronavirus restrictions more than a month after he began to reopen the state’s economy, according to a University of Georgia poll released Wednesday. But most remain anxious about contracting the disease and alarmed about the prospect of a second wave. The poll of registered voters showed Georgians are evenly divided over Kemp’s decision to lift much of the shelter-in-place order, with about 40% on either side of the issue. That’s a 16-point improvement from the school’s April poll, which found about 24% supported the move. About three-quarters of respondents say they’re concerned that they or someone in their family will be exposed to the virus. But the proportion of Georgians who say they’re “very” or “extremely” worried has dropped by 11 points since April. A majority of voters say fighting the disease is more important than restarting the economy, though they are more sharply divided about other debates. About 42% said k-12 schools should resume in-person classes in the fall, compared with one-third who rejected the idea. And most Georgians indicate they’re still uncomfortable visiting some of the businesses that Kemp allowed to reopen in late April. About one-third report they have dined in person at a restaurant, 28% said they have gotten a haircut and one-quarter said they have visited a beach, lake or park since Kemp began easing limits.   An even smaller number said they visited a nail salon (14%) or hit the lanes at a bowling alley (10%).   The polls results also include a glimmer of optimistic economic news. About one-third of respondents say they’ve lost their job or are working less because of the pandemic – down about 7 percentage points from April. A majority – 56% – report no change in their work status, while 12% say they’re working more.
  • Hall County Commissioners continue their budget work in Gainesville, saying they are looking to cut the County’s property tax rate. A Commission to adopt a new budget is set for one week from tonight in Gainesville.From the Hall County Government website…   The Hall County Board of Commissioners announces plans to roll back the General Fund millage rate as a part of the fiscal year 2021 budget process. 'As the board continues to analyze the effects of COVID-19 on our community, the commission also believes it is prudent to scale back its FY 2021 spending plan in anticipation of a potential reduction in revenues,' Hall County Administrator Jock Connell said. 'The members of the board have worked diligently to achieve a lower millage rate even in the midst of the worldwide coronavirus pandemic.' Additional details regarding the proposed FY 2021 budget will be presented to the Board of Commissioners at their regularly scheduled voting meeting on June 11. 'Hall County continues to improve its financial outlook through conservative fiscal management by staff and elected officials, and this year’s budget will continue to reflect that while also ensuring citizens continue to receive effective and efficient services,' said Connell. Hall County Government’s new fiscal year begins July 1, 2020.
  • Some companies have been forced to eliminate or postpone their summer internships due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Others have sought ways to virtually transform them. To help businesses navigate this transition, the University of Georgia’s Innovation District recently hosted two virtual forums where professionals shared best practices, goals and challenges of virtual summer internships. Across the two sessions, 60 participants heard from a panel of nine industry leaders, including Home Depot, Synovus and UPS, among others. “It’s important for us that our students are successful and that, even in these disrupted times, they have opportunities to get the best experiences they can,” said Crystal Leach, director of industry collaborations in UGA’s Office of Research. “So, it’s important that our partners are also successful and can continue providing those opportunities.” During the sessions, representatives explored how to prepare for remote onboarding, how companies can best communicate their cultures virtually, and how to encourage students to take advantage of their redesigned internships. “Our people are our cornerstone, and we want every incoming intern to truly know how much we value them,” said Isobel Egbarin, a talent acquisition specialist with UPS and roundtable participant. “The driving force behind UPS stems from the many contributions of our employees, and we want to do everything we can to ensure that each intern has a meaningful experience with us.” Communication was key for industry leaders. Without face-to-face interaction, businesses need clear direction to help interns get the most out of their experiences. Others saw an opportunity to include interns in more meetings, conversations and online events, thanks to the convenience of virtual platforms. “This transition has called for all hands on deck,” Egbarin said. She explained how UPS established new intern coordinator roles for each large business function to promote uniform onboarding and communication throughout the company. “The times we are in highlight the importance of living out our core values as an organization.” Christie Dougherty, a recruiting coordinator at SAS Institute, recommended finding alternative ways to engage students whose summer internships were postponed. “Students rely on their internships to build meaningful experience to supplement their education, and we are always amazed at the curiosity they bring into our organization,” she said. SAS was able to virtually convert the majority of its internships and offered short-term training and development programs in place of the few it could not. “We knew that continuing our intern program in a virtual environment was critical to our brand and our commitment to developing the workforce of the future,” Dougherty said. The Innovation District will continue identifying topics and delivering virtual content to help industry professionals navigate the challenges posed by COVID-19. “Our hope is that the roundtable could be a small part in helping businesses, and all of us, move forward together,” Leach said. UGA’s Innovation District works to drive economic development and community impact through innovation, entrepreneurship and experiential learning.

Bulldog News

  • ATHENS Georgia basketball sophomore Mike Peake has entered the NCAA transfer portal, according to multiple sources. The 6-foot-8, 220-pound Peake was a late addition to last year's class, signing in August out of Blue Valley Northwest High School in Overland Park, Kans. Peake played in 24 of 32 games last season, including the final 12 contests, averaging 9 minutes per outing with 2.3 points and 2 rebounds. Peake scored a career-high 8 points in the season-opening game against Delaware State and pulled down a season-high 6 rebounds in a season high 23 minutes against South Carolina on Feb. 26. Peake's departure brings the Bulldogs' roster down to 13 scholarship players. RELATED: Georgia adds big V-Tech center, over scholarship limit Georgia added Virginia Tech graduate transfer center P.J. Horne last week. Horne, a 6-6, 225-pounder, averaged 7.6 points and 4.2 rebounds per game last season. UGA Coach Tom Crean DawgNation Georgia basketball WATCH: Tom Crean opens up, tells all on UGA basketball Bulldogs upset Ole Miss in SEC tourney opener Anthony Edwards takes over final minute, UGA topples Arkansas WATCH: Georgia celebrates like crazy after Vandy win Bulldogs score resounding win over No. 13 Auburn UGA snaps four-game losing streak with Texas A&M win Perplexing loss for Georgia basketball at Missouri Georgia comes up short in hard-fought loss at Kentucky Sahvir Wheeler on clutch game-winner, 'been there a ton of times' Anthony Edwards lights up Michigan State for 37 in 93-85 loss The post Georgia basketball sophomore enters transfer portal appeared first on DawgNation.
  • Georgia already had the nation's No. 1 recruiting class for the 2020 cycle. Yet there's a chance it could go to another level with the addition of 5-star CB Tony Grimes. Let's simply couch the thinking here by saying there's a chance it could happen at this time. It could happen for Georgia or North Carolina or Ohio State or Texas A&M, too. Those were the four programs the nation's No. 1 CB prospect for 2021 (247Sports Composite) released as his top 4 schools on Sunday night. Grimes, who was already set to enroll early in January of 2021, is currently probing the possibility of summer graduation and enrolling at the school of his choice in August. That would make him a tremendous late addition to the 2020 recruiting class for one of those four programs. The reason? His father Deon Glover told DawgNation on Wednesday evening it would be because there's a chance that his Princess Anne program (Virginia Beach, Va.) might not have a football season this fall due to the novel coronavirus. Glover feels that his son would be able to reclassify as a class of 2020 recruit if that unfortunate situation presented itself. 'He could have graduated last year,' Glover told DawgNation on Wednesday evening. 'We pushed one class into this year so he could play his senior season. He only needs one class. He can take that online and be done in a month.' That's actually the same path that incoming Georgia Bulldog J.T. Daniels did as a reclassified prospect who joined the USC football program in the summer of 2018. That came after just three varsity seasons of high school football for Daniels. The 6-foot-1, 180-pound Grimes ranks as the nation's No. 1 CB for 2021 and the No. 7 overall prospect for 2021 on the 247Sports Composite ratings. RELATED: 5-star Tony Grimes is a special player both on and off the field If that presents itself to be the case, then the chance to play early doesn't look the same at Georgia as it does for the 2021 season. Grimes is a special talent, but there are three cornerbacks returning to the team this fall for what look to be their resume seasons to enhance their status as a future top 60 pick in the 2021 NFL Draft. Junior Tyson Campbell, Senior D.J. Daniel and redshirt junior Eric Stokes, Jr. all have that potential and the vast playing experience for the Bulldogs during the 2019 season as part of the nation's top-ranked scoring defense. Georgia also signed the nation's No. 1 cornerback for the 2020 cycle in former 5-star Kelee Ringo, too. DAWGNATION RECRUITING (the recent reads on DawgNation.com) Kirby Smart's comments of the 2021 recruiting cycle thus far laced with empathy and uncertainty Nation's No. 1 CB prospect Tony Grimes places UGA among his top four schools BREAKING: All-American OL Dylan Fairchild has made his college decision Brock Vandagriff: How does that family feel about the JT Daniels transfer? The JT Daniels to Georgia buzz seems very real BREAKING: Elite 2022 DB Marquis Groves-Killebrew commits to UGA Who is Chaz Chambliss? Carrollton staff shares the goods on the new Bulldog commit BREAKING: Chaz Chambliss commits to Georgia football Taking a deep dive at how well Georgia has been recruiting Metro Atlanta of late Elite 2022 defensive athlete Daniel Martin already has a 'family' feel at UGA Brock Bowers: Nation's No. 3 TE knows what he needs to do before his college decision De'Jahn Warren: The 'nugget' for the nation's No. 1 JUCO prospect with UGA Decrypting that recent tweet from 5-star LB Smael Mondon Jr. Prince Kollie: The ILB target who had 1,085 yards as a receiver in 2019 Lovasea Carroll: DawgNation goes one-on-one with the 2021 RB commit The post Tony Grimes: Big potential development looms with the nation's No. 1 CB for 2021 appeared first on DawgNation.
  • ATHENS Gene Stallings took time Wednesday to share his feelings on two men he was once hired to beat, revealing friendships that pre-dated rivalries. Stallings, 85, coached at Alabama from 1990-1996, overlapping with former Auburn coach Pat Dye (1981-1992) and former Tennessee coach John Majors (1977-1992). RELATED: Former Georgia All-American Pat Dye dies Dye passed away on Tuesday at the age of 80 years old, and Majors died on Wednesday at 85. Iron Bowl Friendship 'Pat Dye and I have been friends for a long time, let me tell you two or three things about Pat,' Stallings, who still lives on his ranch in Paris, Texas, said in a phone interview on Wednesday. 'We competed against each other in games and also recruiting, and we never had a cross word. 'Pat always conducted himself as a gentlemen. He was very competitive, his teams played well.' Stallings and Dye served together on the board for Great Southern Wood for more than 20 years. The two had gone on a hunting trip together last year with former UGA quarterback and head coach Ray Goff. Dye replaced Stallings on Paul 'Bear' Bryant's Alabama coaching staff as an assistant in 1965. Stallings left the staff to become head coach at Texas A&M, before his 14 years on Tom Landry's Dallas Cowboys' coaching staff (1972-85). Stallings returned to the SEC as the Tide's head coach in 1990 after a stint as the St. Louis/Phoenix Cardinals head coach in the NFL. By then, Dye had taken over as Auburn's head coach (1981) after stints at East Carolina (1974-79) and Wyoming (1980) and put the Tigers' program 'on the marquee.' Dye had, in fact, changed the course of the Auburn-Alabama rivalry. The Tigers had won four straight over Alabama for the first time in almost 30 years before Stallings snapped the streak his first year back in Tuscaloosa. Dye, also acting as Auburn athletic director, also persuaded the Tigers' boosters to playing the 'Iron Bowl' in Auburn rather than Birmingham where the gamehad traditionally been played dating back to 1904. 'That had been done before I got back, but if it were up to me, I'm not sure I would have changed it,' Stallings told DawgNation, asked about going to a home-and-home. 'I think it was a good thing they changed it. But when Pat retired (1992), we were still playing the game (in Alabama home years) in Birmingham.' Third Saturday Handshake Alabama was also playing its home games against Tennessee in Birmingham, rather than Tuscaloosa, when Stallings coached the Tide to the 1992 national championship. Alabama had to get through Majors and the Vols in Knoxville that season, gutting out a 17-10 win in a rivalry Stallings said was at times more fierce than Auburn, despite his friendship with Majors. 'Johnny was an assistant coach at (Mississippi State), when I was coaching at Alabama,' Stallings recalled. 'We would meet together in Nashville and we would recruit, and then we'd meet together and have dinner that night. 'I've always loved and appreciated Johnny Majors. One of the things he did, he raised his grandson. Johnny took the grandson and raised him like he was is and I always appreciated Johnny for that.' Stallings' family priorities have been well documented. He authored the book 'Another Season: A Coach's Story of Raising an Exceptional Son.' The writing is about Stallings' relationship with his late son, John Mark, who was born with Down syndrome and a hear defect. But on the football field, Stallings, Dye and Majors were all business. 'When the game gets started, you don't worry about who is coach on the other side of the field, you get ready for the team, not the coach,' Stallings said. 'When my team played Coach Bryant, I loved Coach Bryant, but when the game got underway, it was Texas A&M playing against Alabama. 'It was the same thing with Johnny. We were friends, and I showed him respect.' Rivalry perspective The Tennessee game, like the Auburn game, was historically a big deal and many still feel the same way. 'Coach Bryant, he had rather beat Tennessee than Auburn in those early years,' said Stallings, who played for Bryant at Texas A&M before serving as an assistant under him. 'I know things have a tendency to change, but he really got the team ready to play Tennessee. Auburn was not a great team in those years, and then Pat (Dye) put them on the marquee. 'But before that, we'd get ready for Tennessee two weeks before the game. 'If you're going to be accepted at the University of Alabama, you have to beat Tennessee, you have to beat Auburn, and eventually you have to win the national championship.' Stallings went 3-0 at Alabama against Dye and Majors some three decades ago en route to joining them in the College Football Hall of Fame. On Wednesday, he mourned losing both of them. The post Alabama legend Gene Stallings reflects on friends Pat Dye and Johnny Majors appeared first on DawgNation.
  • It seems like fourscore and four news cycles ago when Georgia football coach Kirby Smart joined the beat reporter corps on Zoom last Thursday. It came before a weekend when America's attention shifted away from the novel coronavirus to Minneapolis. There were the actions of peaceful protestors and then those not-so-civil activists. It turned our heads away from the policies which would be in place this week for the return of Georgia's players to Athens to begin preparations for the 2020 season . This week marks a rite of passage for every new season.The UGA signees from the 2020 signing class that did not enroll early are officially moving away from home to join the program and campus life in Athens, too. In the midst of all of that, the Bulldogs were also able to add another former 5-star QB prospect to first-year offensive coordinator Todd Monken's room. That JT Daniels stuff took on a life of its own, too. Those events eclipsed a lot of what Smart said on that Thursday morning visit with the beat reporters who cover the UGA team on a regular basis. It was specifically interesting what Smart had to say about recruiting. 'First off, it's extremely different,' the fifth-year head coach said. 'The recruiting world has changed as much as anything because you're just not capable of going to high schools.' He did not duck the obvious there. When we come to think of it, the Georgia staff has basically had three full weeks (weekends included) of on-campus recruiting in 2020. That's now into the first week of June. Those were the last three weekends in January. That was followed by the National Signing Day for the 2020 class in the first week of February, but then another dead period for the rest of that month. Georgia only had a small number of unofficial visitors on campus in March. The Bulldogs were taking advantage of spring break before ramping up to roll the welcome mat out after the first weekend in March. Spring drills would be underway and the months of March and April would be big for visitors. 'We would be going out watching spring practices, going school-to-school,' Smart told the UGA beat on Thursday. 'I wouldn't be able to because I don't get to go out in May, so that didn't really change for me, but it changed for a lot of our coaches. We've done what you guys know to be the case. There's no magic potion. There's nobody doing something magically that everybody else isn't doing. We're jumping on Zoom. We're communicating with parents, coaches, recruitswe're doing everything virtually, and that's really the best we can do.' The staff was set to go on the road from April 15 to May 30 to further evaluate the top 2021, 2022 and 2023 prospects during their own spring practices.The pandemic made sure none of that took place. Throw away that calendar. The NCAA also shared word last week that all on-campus recruiting would still be halted until July 31. too. Division I Council Coordination Committee extends recruiting dead period: https://t.co/kxNibUf3B2 pic.twitter.com/0cRcTbrxQp Inside the NCAA (@InsidetheNCAA) May 27, 2020 'They keep extending the period that you can't come on campusthe ability to come on campus, they just extended that, so it's looking like that's not going to happen through the end of July,' Smart said. 'So, it's going to be a very different May-June-July period and that's unique. Who manages that the best will be importanta lot of this is who had the best relationships leading into this because, at the end of the day, you can only develop so much of a relationship through a phone, through a text, through a virtual activity. We've tried to be creative in the way we use that. I'm certainly not going to divulge everything we've done because I don't think that's open for everybody to do, and I think we're all competing in the SEC, trying to make ourselves different.' Did you know the weekly DawgNation.com 'Before the Hedges' program is now available as an Apple podcast? Click to check it out and download. Georgia football: Kirby Smart continues to empathize with recruits The Bulldogs are certainly not lacking in the recruiting department. They never will be under this staff. Despite those obstacles, the Bulldogs still have the No. 13 overall recruiting class on the well-respected 247Sports Team Composite rankings.That ranking was boosted by the commitments of All-American Georgia prospects Chaz Chambliss and Dylan Fairchild over the last week. That gave the Bulldogs nine commits for the 2021 cycle. It comes while still showing remarkable restraint in not taking commitments from prospects the staff still felt like it needed further in-person or more senior year film for a complete evaluation. When it comes to those national team rankings, there'snot a single team above the Bulldogs that does not have at least two more verbal commitments at this time. The number of commitments those schools have on UGA at this time is even markedly higher than that in some cases. The average number of pledges for the top 12 comes out to 15.8 commits per school. Georgia is well-positioned based on the fact that the average 247Sports Composite rating of each of its commitments currently stands at 94.05. That's a focus on quality rather than an impressive volume of commitments at this time. Tennesse sits at No. 2 overall due in large part to its 24 commitments, but those prospects merit an average individual player rating of 89.73.Ohio State has the No. 1 class right now due to its average rating of 95.34 for each of its 18 commitments. Clemson also has a mean rating of 94.55 for each of its 13 pledges. Smart wonders about the effects on the 2021 recruits in general with all of this downtime. The alpha recruiters on every major Power 5 staff have had nothing consequential to do over the last three months except focus on the core recruits on the board. 'I can tell you this: it's probably created a bigger burden on our recruits, and if I was a recruit or a recruit's parent, I would be more concerned with that volume of virtual usage and phone usage, and it's probably led to more kids committing because you can make the case that they're committing because they can't go anywhere,' Smart said. 'I would make the case that they're sick and tired of being barraged by phone calls and virtual activities.' National recruiting analyst Bud Elliott of 247Sports continues to do an admirable job tracking the number of 2021 commitments to this point and comparing it to previous the same timestamp in previous cycles. Morning of May 30: 913 Last year's class on this date: 390 The gap grew again. https://t.co/plzt0mRvXT Bud Elliott (@BudElliott3) May 30, 2020 Will this class just be different? Or will the real recruiting cycle for the 2021 class take place in the span of just seven months? Could we see official visits in August in the thick of fall practices? When prospects do get the NCAA green light to return to campus again, it will mean they will have less than five months before the first day of the early signing period to figure out where they want to go. That same condensed time frame will also influence the schools handing out these scholarships, too. Smart wondered what that might lead to. 'Will we see more kids come November or December de-commit, or go back and start visiting?' Smart said. 'I don't know because I don't know when we'll be able to bring kids to campus. All that will probably come out at the end of July when we know more about what kids are going to be able to do in recruiting.' DAWGNATION RECRUITING (the recent reads on DawgNation.com) Nation's No. 1 CB prospect Tony Grimes places UGA among his top four schools BREAKING: All-American OL Dylan Fairchild has made his college decision Brock Vandagriff: How does that family feel about the JT Daniels transfer? The JT Daniels to Georgia buzz seems very real BREAKING: Elite 2022 DB Marquis Groves-Killebrew commits to UGA Who is Chaz Chambliss? Carrollton staff shares the goods on the new Bulldog commit BREAKING: Chaz Chambliss commits to Georgia football Taking a deep dive at how well Georgia has been recruiting Metro Atlanta of late Elite 2022 defensive athlete Daniel Martin already has a 'family' feel at UGA Brock Bowers: Nation's No. 3 TE knows what he needs to do before his college decision De'Jahn Warren: The 'nugget' for the nation's No. 1 JUCO prospect with UGA Decrypting that recent tweet from 5-star LB Smael Mondon Jr. Prince Kollie: The ILB target who had 1,085 yards as a receiver in 2019 Lovasea Carroll: DawgNation goes one-on-one with the 2021 RB commit The post Georgia football: Kirby Smart's comments on the 2021 recruiting cycle laced with empathy, uncertainty appeared first on DawgNation.
  • ATHENS Hutson Mason admits he was as surprised as anyone last week when news dropped that former Southern Cal quarterback J.T. Daniels intended to transfer to Georgia. 'I wasn't so much surprised he chose Georgia (over Tennessee and Michigan), I was more so surprised that Georgia wasn't looking for another quarterback,' Mason, a former Bulldogs' quarterback, told DawgNation. 'Kirby is in an interesting spot with Jake Fromm gone . ' Interesting, for sure. Quarterback Derby The Bulldogs return 80 percent of the production off a championship caliber defense while reloading on the other side of the football with offensive gurus Todd Monken and Matt Luke. Daniels, should he be granted a waiver for immediate eligibility, would jump into a five-man quarterback derby. WATCH: USC beat writer shares inside info on JT Daniels Wake Forest graduate transfer Jamie Newman appears to be the favorite to start, but there's also D'Wan Mathis (redshirt freshman), Carson Beck (freshman) and Stetson Bennett (redshirt junior). Mason said he doesn't think UGA's tentative offensive blueprint would need to drastically change course with Daniels under center. USC has also run a Pro Style version of the spread with RPO concepts. 'One of the things I was surprised by when I was watching tape on him, he's far more nimble and shifty and elusive in the picket than I thought,' Mason said. 'I think he's far more athletic than Jake . 'That was the first thing that stuck out to me. I would see a clip where the pocket collapsed and would normally be a sack or a negative play last year for Jake, and for me, he gets out of. He turns what should be a sack into a 4-yard pickup, or he extends the play and makes something out of nothing.' Questionable Knee Mason said as much as he liked on tape, there's a question if Daniels will possess the same mobility if he's playing in a knee brace after suffering a torn ACL in last season's opening game. 'I don't know if he will be the same in the pocket and escape a lot of things because that knee brace is extremely restrictive on quarterbacks,' Mason said. 'I tried to wear one because a lot of offensive coordinators in college have the theory that they want their quarterback to wear one to protect their knee from the blind side.' Quarterback injuries have become more common as the speed of the game has increased and more teams have spread the field. Mason, himself, has experience attempting to play in a precautionary knee brace. 'I tried fiddling around with it a coupe springs, and I was like 'I hate this,' it's like a peg leg, you literally feel like you have one leg,' Mason said. 'So that that was my concern if he's coming off that knee injury and he has to wear a knee brace, will he ever be the nimble guy in the pocket that I saw on tape?' First Look Mason, who quarterbacked Georgia to a 10-3 record in 2014 and now provides analysts on Atlanta's WCNN-AM 680 'The Fan,' went directly to the archives upon hearing Daniels was heading to Athens. Hearing about a player is one thing, but seeing him and evaluating him in game action, is another. Mason provided a video breakdown of Daniels on Twitter last week. @GeorgiaFootball adds another 5 QB in JT Daniels. The more tape I watch of him the more impressed I become. pic.twitter.com/yEgWPkLdqH Hutson Mason (@HMason14) May 29, 2020 'I believe the two most important traits are accuracy and tight windows, that's why I chose that clip,' Mason said. 'And, it was functional arm strength. A lot of people think arm strength is how far can you throw the ball in a straight line, and that'a a huge misconception. 'It's more of when the pocket collapses, and you have a messy pocket, with somebody at your feet and you can't step into the throw, do you still have enough functional arm strength to get the ball down the field?' NCAA Waiver It has yet to be determined if Daniels will be seen on the field this season, as the will need the NCAA to grant him a waiver for immediate eligibility similar to the one Miami's Tate Martell received when leaving Ohio State. 'I'm sure Kirby's pitch was, We are a quarterback position away from being a national champion,' that's what I believe Kirby's pitch to him was,' Mason said. 'That's pretty enticing. 'I think the program is selling itself, and that was probably more of the angle. But I was surprised, because it seems like, man,'how much more room do you have for quarterbacks?' Time will tell. Georgia players have started arriving back on campus with voluntary workouts set to begin next Monday. DawgNation JT Daniels stories Georgia getting accurate, cerebral' quarterback in JT Daniels Addition of JT Daniels continues UGA inroads into California Breaking down the angles of JT Daniels' addition Details emerge on USC transfer JT Daniels Kirby Smart addresses new normal routine for players The post WATCH: First look at new Georgia quarterback JT Daniels from Hutson Mason appeared first on DawgNation.