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Latest from Logan Booker

    Jefferson , Georgia based Jackson EMC is preparing for the effects of Hurricane Michael, which is expected to bring lots of rain and heavy winds to Georgia starting later today. The company issued some tips and guidelines to what you should do if you become affected by the storm.  From Jackson EMC:  (JEFFERSON, GA. Oct. 10, 2018) Jackson EMC is closely monitoring the projected forecast of Hurricane Michael and is ready to respond if Northeast Georgia is impacted. Current forecasts indicate Northeast Georgia could experience strong winds and rain beginning Wednesday evening, Oct. 10, due to Hurricane Michael.  Linemen and other support personnel stand ready to respond to our members when needed.  For information about storm preparation, to report outages and for a listing of current outages visit: www.jacksonemc.com/storm.  Resources:  Report Outages. Jackson EMC members should report outages to at 1-800-245-4044 or by visiting outage.jacksonemc.com.   Storm Center. Outage updates and a map with current outages is available at: news.jacksonemc.com/outages/.   Outage Map. Available in the Storm Center, the Outage Map provides real-time information on outages. www.jacksonemc.com/storm   @JacksonEMC on Twitter. Follow @JacksonEMC on Twitter for storm tips and outage updates, or like us on Facebook JacksonEMC.  (JEFFERSON, GA. Oct. 10, 2018) Jackson EMC is closely monitoring the projected forecast of Hurricane Michael and is ready to respond if Northeast Georgia is impacted. Current forecasts indicate Northeast Georgia could experience strong winds and rain beginning Wednesday evening, Oct. 10, due to Hurricane Michael.  Linemen and other support personnel stand ready to respond to our members when needed.  For information about storm preparation, to report outages and for a listing of current outages visit: www.jacksonemc.com/storm.  Resources:  Report Outages. Jackson EMC members should report outages to at 1-800-245-4044 or by visiting outage.jacksonemc.com.   Storm Center. Outage updates and a map with current outages is available at: news.jacksonemc.com/outages/.   Outage Map. Available in the Storm Center, the Outage Map provides real-time information on outages. www.jacksonemc.com/storm   @JacksonEMC on Twitter. Follow @JacksonEMC on Twitter for storm tips and outage updates, or like us on Facebook JacksonEMC. 
  • The Athens-Clarke County Police Department is reporting a home invasion overnight in Athens.  From The ACCPD:  On October 3, 2018 at 2:23 am, officers responded to a Home Invasion call on Atlanta Avenue. Upon arrival, officers met with the victim who stated that when he entered his residence, he witnessed male intruders actively committing a burglary. The intruders were wearing hoodies with their faces covered. Each intruder was armed and pointed their guns at the victim before leaving the residence with stolen property which included electronic devices and other items. The victim’s two roommates were asleep and were not aware of the incident. The case is being investigated and anyone with information regarding this case should contact Detective Black: (706) 613-3330 ext 798 or Scott.Black@accgov.com . 
  • A pedestrian was killed late Thursday night while walking along Winterville Road on Athens’ Eastside.  From the Athens Clarke County Police:  On September 27, 2018 at approximately 10:29 pm, officers responded to call of a pedestrian in the roadway on Winterville Road near Hancock Road. Upon investigation, it was found that the victim, Leona Englert, 38 years of age, was walking westbound in the westbound lane of Winterville Road when she was struck by a vehicle, a 1993 Honda Accord. The Accord driver stopped at the scene. EMS was called to the scene and police then called the Coroner, who pronounced the victim deceased. At this time, no charges are pending but the investigation continues.
  • The University of Georgia vs. Middle Tennessee State football game on Saturday September, 15th has become the latest event to be impacted by Hurricane Florence, which is on track to effect weather across the Southeast the next several days.  Kickoff was scheduled for 7:15pm on Saturday but has instead been rescheduled for NOON to accommodate travel for those in areas that will be affected by the storm.  The latest track of Florence has it moving into the Carolinas sometime in the next day or so, and then potentially making a turn towards Georgia as the storm weakens over land. While wind gusts are expected, no hurricane force winds are expected in Georgia, but outer rain bands could bring with them several inches of rainfall along with gusty winds at times.  Statement from UGA: “After extensive evaluation involving the uncertainty of weather conditions on the east coast, and consideration of all constituencies involved including fans, support staff, and law enforcement, the Saturday Georgia-Middle Tennessee State game has been moved from 7:15 p.m. to a 12 noon kickoff in Sanford Stadium.”   The game will be televised on ESPN News and will stream live on the ESPN app.   The University of Georgia encourages fans to support disaster relief efforts through the Red Cross by texting “REDCROSS’ to 90999 to donate $10 from your phone, call 1-800-RED CROSS, or going online to   https://www.redcross.org/donate/hurricane-florence-donations.html/  
  • The University of Georgia’s annual 40 Under 40 Awards Luncheon is on tap for today, underway at noon at the Georgia Aquarium in Atlanta. The event, organized each year by the UGA Alumni Association, honors University graduates under the age of 40, those who have achieved success in their respective fields of endeavor.  The class of 2018 recipients: Kristin Bernhard, 2009, Atlanta, deputy commissioner for system reform, Georgia Department of Early Care and Learning Brooke Bowen, 2007 and 2010, Atlanta, legal counsel, Board of Regents of the University System of Georgia Chase Cain, 2005, West Hollywood, California, creative producer, Hulu Matt Coley, 2003 and 2005, Cordele, owner/operator, Coley Gin and Fertilizer/Coley Farms Caitlyn Cooper, 2007, Marietta, partner, GMHC360 and president, Caitlyn Cooper Consulting Matthew Crim, 2005, Athens, general cardiologist, assistant professor of medicine, Piedmont Heart Institute, Augusta University/University of Georgia Medical Partnership Meredith Dean, 2014, Charlotte, North Carolina, founder, The Dean’s List and program coordinator, Ryan Seacrest Studios Joshua Delaney, 2011, Washington, D.C., senior education policy advisor, U.S. Senate, Office of Sen. Elizabeth Warren Ivey Evans, 2006 and 2013, Columbus, social purpose manager, Aflac David Felfoldi, 2001, Brookhaven, chief experience officer, SHERPA Global Cartter Fontaine, 2010 and 2012, Athens, CEO, DT Productions Quanza Griffin, 2001, Decatur, public health analyst, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Betsy Grunch, 2002, Oakwood, medical doctor, The Longstreet Clinic PC Tyler Harper, 2009, Ocilla, owner/operator, Tyler Harper Farms and Georgia state senator for District 7 Scott Irvine, 2002, Birmingham, Alabama, associate professor in the department of emergency medicine, University of Alabama-Birmingham Jonathan Jones, 2013, Indianapolis, Indiana, improvement engineer, Corteva Agriscience, Agriculture Division of DowDuPont Chloe Kelley, 2006, New York City, NY, senior vice president, PIMCO William Keyes, 2010 and 2013, Washington, D.C., captain, U.S. Army and prosecutor, Department of Defense William “Billy” Kirkland III, 2009, Washington, D.C., special assistant to the president/deputy director of intergovernmental affairs, The White House Ryan Leveille, 2013, Atlanta, global design manager innovation lab, General Electric Erin Lincoln, 2005, Atlanta, associate director, Tetra Tech Inc. Carrie Settles Livers, 2002, Snellville, “STEMpreneurship” educator, Brookwood High School/Brookwood Aquaponics Mohamed Massaquoi, 2008, Atlanta, owner, Mohamed Massaquoi Inc. Margaux Charbonnet Murray, 2002, Atlanta, medical director, Medically Complex Care Program, Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta Muktha Natrajan, 2011, Atlanta, postdoctoral fellow, Emory University John Ozier, 2002, Nashville, Tennessee, vice president of creative, ole Song LLC Lauren Pearson, 2002, Birmingham, Alabama, managing director/partner, HighTower Twickenham Ryan Prior, 2012, Atlanta, cross-platform associate producer, CNN Lucas Puente, 2010, San Francisco, California, lead economist, Thumbtack Tameka Rish, 2003, Atlanta, vice president of corporate partnerships, AMBSE (Atlanta Falcons, Atlanta United, Mercedes-Benz Stadium) Ben Ross, 2008, Statesboro, owner/pharmacist, Forest Heights Pharmacy Latham Saddler, 2005, Washington, D.C., Navy SEAL, U.S. Navy and director of intelligence programs, National Security Council Adrianna Samaniego, 2010, San Francisco, California, co-founder, Area 120, Google Inc. Julie Secrist, 2006, Atlanta, senior project manager, Southeastern Engineering Rhondolyn Smith, 2004, Winterville, clinical pharmacist, Northside Hospital JaBaris D. Swain, 2001, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, fellow, cardiothoracic surgery, division of cardiovascular surgery, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania Amy Washington, 2009, Bogart, founder/executive director, Kupendwa Ministries Chip Wile, 2002, Ormond Beach, Florida, president, Daytona International Speedway Michael Williams, 2001 and 2006, Kennesaw, finance director, The Home Depot Stephanie Yarnell, 2006, New Haven, Connecticut, physician, division of law and psychiatry, department of psychiatry, Yale University.
  • Jackson EMC is preparing for Hurricane Florence and has provided a list of tips and advice for local and broad customers: From Jackson EMC: Jackson EMC is closely monitoring the projected forecast of Hurricane Florence and its potential impact on Northeast Georgia and is ready to respond. Current forecasts indicate Northeast Georgia could experience strong winds and rain as a result of Hurricane Florence beginning Sunday, Sept. 16. Linemen and other support personnel stand ready to respond to our members when needed.   While preparing for the potential threat Hurricane Florence poses for North Georgia, consider the following electrical safety tips: Beware of fallen power lines. If you come upon a fallen power line, assume that it is electrically charged. This includes cable TV feeds and telephone lines. Report any downed line to your power company. Report an outage to Jackson EMC at 1-800-245-4044 or by visiting outage.jacksonemc.com. Leave it to the professionals. If you feel your house has been damaged, have a licensed electrician check your home. If you decide to evacuate, make sure the water and electricity are shut off at your residence. Take proper precautions when using a generator if you lose power. Place the generator outside the home, as dangerous carbon monoxide fumes are odorless and can quickly overwhelm you indoors. Also, never connect generators to another power source, such as power lines. The reverse flow of electricity or “backfeed” can electrocute an unsuspecting utility worker. Prepare for medical needs, such as having a plan for loved ones who depend on medical equipment that requires electricity. This includes backup power, extra medical supplies and medication, or going to an alternative location until the storm is over. A final helpful hint. In the event of a power outage, check your breaker panels before calling your power company. Check both the main breaker on the inside panel and outside disconnect (usually only found on newer homes) located close to your electric meter. If the breaker is tripped, it will be stopped halfway between 'off' and 'on.' Turn the breaker off first and then back on to reset it. If you still have power in part of your home, check the individual breakers in the panel.   A complete list of items to help homes and business prepare before the storm is available on the Jackson EMC website at: www.jacksonemc.com/prepare.  For more information about storm preparation, to report outages and for a listing of current outages visit: www.jacksonemc.com/storm. Resources: Report Outages. Jackson EMC members should report outages to at 1-800-245-4044 or by visiting outage.jacksonemc.com. Storm Center. Outage updates and a map with current outages is available at: news.jacksonemc.com/outages/.  Outage Map. Available in the Storm Center, the Outage Map provides real-time information on outages. www.jacksonemc.com/storm @JacksonEMC on Twitter. Follow @JacksonEMC on Twitter for storm tips and outage updates, or like us on Facebook JacksonEMC.
  • If you're traveling to Columbia, Missouri on September 22nd, go ahead and start finalizing those UGA Football tailgate plans.  The No. 3 ranked Georgia Bulldogs will kickoff against the Missouri Tigers in the Show Me State at 12 p.m. ET on Faurot Field. The game will be televised on ESPN.  The Bulldogs have not lost in Columbia since the Tigers joined the SEC in 2012, when Georgia welcomed the newcomers to the conference on their field with a 41-20 victory. The most recent trip resulted in a much closer 28-27 victory which included a fourth down conversion for a TD late in the game in 2016. 
  • Residents of the Athens community got a chance to hang out and eat with local law enforcement in the first of a series of cookouts.  From the ACCPD:  Last night, officers with the ACCPD hosted the first of several community cookouts in the Columbia Brookside neighborhood. These cookouts are part of our community-oriented policing philosophy of maintaining open dialogue with the community we serve. Chief R. Scott Freeman implemented these cookouts as a way to get interaction between officers and community. “On many occasions the only interaction the community may have with an officer is in a law enforcement capacity. These cookouts are designed to help break the ice and get conversations started, and allows members of the community to meet and get to know the officers who serve their community.” We would like to thank other ACC agencies that participated in the event as well as our officers and volunteers for making this cookout a great success.  More photos from last night’s event: 
  • The date has not yet been set, but there will be a court hearing on plans to redo an election held earlier this year in Habersham County, in which Republican State Representative Dan Gasaway lost a GOP primary to former Banks County School Superintendent Chris Erwin. At issue are indications that some voters in the district that includes parts of Banks, Stephens, and Habersham counties received ballots from the wrong House district. Erwin defeated incumbent Gasaway by just 67 votes. 
  • They are calling it the largest methamphetamine bust in Banks County history: two men from California have been arrested and more than $2.6 million worth of meth confiscated. The Banks County Sheriff’s Office says the arrests cap an investigation that began a month ago. Juan Valencia and Fernando Mendez are from Santa Ana California. Along with the methamphetamine, drug agents say they confiscated almost seven pounds of cocaine, ten firearms, and more than $20,000 in cash. 
  • Logan Booker

    Logan Booker is the producer for Classic City Today on 98.7FM and AM 1340 WGAU from 6am-10am weekdays, and occasionally contributes on-air with Tim Bryant. Logan also covers the midday news on WGAU Monday-Friday. On occasion, he fills as a co-host of The Morning Show on 960 The Ref. 

    Logan has covered UGA sports since 2012, previously with Bulldawg Illustrated. 

    He is a graduate of the Grady College of Journalism and Mass Communication at the University of Georgia, where he earned a degree in magazine journalism in addition to a Grady Sports Media certificate. He was born and raised in Lawrenceville, Georgia, and in addition to his current home in Bethlehem, Georgia, he spends lots of time with his dog and his boat in Lincoln County, Georgia. 

     

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Local News

  • The Atlanta Braves announced Monday that the organization has agreed to terms on a two-year contract for manager Brian Snitker. The contract does include a third-year club option for 2021.  Snitker took over as manager for the Braves in 2016 and led the team to their first National League East Division title in five years this season.  Here is the full statement from the Atlanta Braves: The Atlanta #Braves and manager Brian Snitker have agreed to terms on a two-year contract with a club option for the 2021 season: pic.twitter.com/CsReyEyU9x — Atlanta Braves (@Braves) October 15, 2018 TRENDING STORIES: Georgia already topping list for flu activity in the nation President Trump to view storm damage in Georgia Atlanta police seize drugs and guns from a popular food mart Snitker has been with the Braves organization for 43 seasons, including three seasons as manager for Triple-A club in Gwinnett.  The National League 'Manager of the Year' candidate, who turns 63 on Wednesday, owns a 221-227 (.493) record in his two-plus seasons. Information from our partners at The Atlanta Journal-Constitution was used in this report.
  • Jackson County Commissioners meet tonight at the courthouse in Jefferson: their session is underway at 6 o’clock this evening. Commissioners will consider a proposal from developers who wants 2 million square feet of warehouse space on 357 acres off Josh Pirkle Road in Jackson County. It’s a project opposed by the Jackson County Planning Commission. There is an afternoon meeting of the Oconee County Industrial Development Authority, 4 o’clock at Oconee County Chamber of Commerce offices in Watkinsville.  Tonight’s meeting of the Oconee County Planning Commission is set for 7 o’clock at the courthouse in Watkinsville.  Madison County’s Industrial Development Authority meets at 6 o’clock this evening at the Historic Courthouse in Danielsville.
  • Athens-Clarke County Police Lieutenant Jeff Clark begins his new assignment as the Department’s Deputy Police Chief. Clark is a 20-year veteran of local law enforcement. He takes over for Justin Gregory, who resigned earlier this month. The naming of a new deputy chief comes from interim Chief Mike Hunsinger, who took over after the resignation of former Chief Scott Freeman, who was asked to resign by Athens-Clarke County Manger Blaine Williams.  From the Athens-Clarke Co PD... ACCPD Interim Chief Mike Hunsinger has appointed Lt. Jeff Clark, a 20-year veteran with the ACCPD, to Interim Deputy Chief. Interim Deputy Chief Clark rose through the ranks from Patrolman to Detective, serving as a Sergeant and Lieutenant in both the Patrol and Criminal Investigation Bureaus. Clark is a veteran of the U.S. Army, a graduate of the Georgia Association of Chiefs of Police Command College and a graduate of Columbus State College with a Master of Public Administration degree. “Interim Deputy Chief Clark is highly regarded in the department and has the education and experience needed for this position. I look forward to working with him in his new role,” stated Interim Chief Hunsinger. As Interim Deputy Chief, Clark will oversee the day-to-day operation of all police functions. Outside his work with the ACCPD, Clark volunteers with a variety of local organizations. “My favorite part of law enforcement is engaging with the officers and citizens to address public safety concerns. I look forward to working with the employees of the ACCPD and the citizens of Athens-Clarke County,' said Clark.
  • The GBI continues its investigation into a deadly officer involved shooting in Hall County: a man was killed by Hall County deputies after a 7-hour SWAT standoff at a home in East Hall. Those deputies say he fired at them from the front door of the house on Truelove Road. James Manus was 41 years old. No law enforcement officers were injured. From the Hall County Sheriff’s Office… On October 13, 2018, just before 5 PM, Sheriff’s Deputies responded to 3185 Truelove Road, in East Hall County, regarding a man with a gun.    Upon arrival, they learned that the resident of that address had pointed at handgun at neighbors, and when the Deputies attempted to make contact with him, he barricaded himself inside the residence and refused all attempts at communication. SWAT team members and Investigators arrived on the scene a short time later, and an extended effort to establish contact and negotiate with the suspect was undertaken.    At approximately 11 PM, the suspect began shooting at Deputies from within the residence. Just after midnight, he appeared in the front doorway and again fired at Deputies, who returned fire, fatally striking the suspect.    No Deputies or bystanders were injured during the incident.    As is customary in officer-involved shooting cases, the Georgia Bureau of Investigation was called to the scene and has assumed the investigation.    No further information will be released at this time, pending the GBI investigation. 
  • There has been a second deadly vehicle vs motorcycle accident in less than a week in Athens: last week, 27 year-old Douglas Nash was killed when his motorcycle collided with a car on Barnett Shoals Drive; last night, 43 year-old Antion Brown of Athens was killed in a wreck on Spring Valley Road. The Georgia State Patrol is investigating the crash, which happened at Spring Valley and Indian Hills Drive.  A 29 year-old man is dead, the victim of a car accident in Hall County. Gainesville Police say Thomas Garrett lost control of his car, swerving off a roadway and overturning twice. 

Bulldog News

  • ATHENS — College football games between relatively evenly matched teams can often come down to a handful of plays, with momentum playing a large role in the outcome. The LSU-Georgia game on Saturday in Tiger Stadium was no different, the Bayou Bengals prevailing 36-16 over the previously undefeated Bulldogs. Both teams had their strengths, but they had also shown their deficiencies leading up to a high-profile clash that drew the largest college football game rating last weekend. LSU did a better job of exposing the Bulldogs’ weaknesses than Georgia did the Tigers. Here are the three key moments that played a large role in determining the outcome of Saturday’s game 1. Georgia’s failed fake field goal Perhaps the biggest play of the game in hindsight, as Georgia had ran the ball nine straight times for 60 yards before two incomplete passes put the Bulldogs in position for a field goal attempt. Kirby Smart said the staff knew before the game they were going to run a fake if they saw an LSU alignment they felt they could take advantage of, and the Tigers presented that look on Georgia’s second drive. “They were like 15 of 17 (88 percent) with a look that it would work on,” Smart said, explaining why the Bulldogs passed on a 31-yard field goal attempt at the 3:28 mark of the opening quarter, down 3-0. “We wanted to be aggressive.” LSU coach Ed Orgeron said Georgia’s fake field goal did indeed surprise him. “ It surprised me, 10 yards to go, it surprised me,” he said. “But we always have a guy for the fake. We have eyes. And when you’re playing for the field goal block, you have to have your eyes on your man, not on the field goal kicker. Tremendous discipline.” 2. LSU’s 47-yard run on third-and-1 Tiger Stadium erupted again on the final play of the first quarter on the ensuing drive after Georgia had lost its initial momentum with the fruitless fake field goal. The game within the game was LSU’s offensive line vs. the Georgia front seven, and this was the first short-yardage battle of the game, third-and-1 at the Tigers’ 46. RELATED: Kirby Smart challenges defense to ‘knuckle up’ at LSU The Bulldogs were not gap sound, and LSU’s Clyde Edwards-Helaire rushed 47 yards to the UGA 7 to set up a TD that made it 10-0. It was only the second run of longer than 20 yards Georgia had given up all season. The play gave the Tigers the confidence they needed to go for it on four other fourth-and-1 situations against the Bulldogs, all of which they converted in back-breaking fashion. “At the end of the day,” Smart said, “you don’t win the line of scrimmage in this league, you won’t win the football game.” Orgeron, meanwhile, said LSU was still smarting from its 27-19 loss at Florida the week before. The Tigers coach was intent to make amends after electing to kick a field goal from the Gators’ 15-yard line on a fourth-and-inches situation in the second quarter with that game tied at 7-7.. “We were throwing out the kitchen sink, man, everything we had, we did,” Orgeron said, asked about the decision to go for it on four fourth downs against Georgia. “All week, we talked about being aggressive. I was a little pissed at myself for not going for it against Florida down there fourth and half an inch.” Third-and-6 sack in fourth quarter Georgia trailed 19-9 when it took over at the LSU 38-yard line with 14:39 remaining, Mecole Hardman having broken loose on a 27-yard punt return after the Bulldogs’ defense turned the momentum by forcing LSU to go three-and-out. RELATED: LSU defensive wizard outschemed Georgia football A jet sweep call for Hardman was stopped for no gain, and then Justin Fields was brought in to handoff to third-string tailback Brian Herrien for 4 yards, bringing up the third-and-6 at the 34. Georgia was still within Rodrigo Blankenship’s field goal range when Jake Fromm took the snap, but the veteran QB failed to make a play — instead taking a 9-yard sack that took the Bulldogs out of field goal range. “Some of those you’ve got to escape and get rid of the ball, there’s a lot of pressures they run that are hard to pick up, and I was very concerned with that coming into the game,” Smart said. “But I didn’t think it was the protection as much as it was making decisions quicker, getting rid of the ball quicker, and at the end of the day, don’t be in third-and-long.”   LSU, its crowd still roaring from the sack, responded with a six-play, 86-yard drive to go up 26-9. Georgia-LSU football DawgNation Georgia-LSU top-rated television game, Atlanta market shines Kirby Smart defends Jake Fromm at LSU Georgia football saw warning signs, couldn’t dodge Tigers’ trap Why didn’t Georgia use Justin Fields more? Report card: Bulldogs bomb midterm Georgia football stock report, LSU cashes in on Dawgs mistakes Instant analysis: Georgia melts in Louisiana heat against LSU Tigers came at Georgia for four downs on each series RECAP: Scoring, injuries, news from Georgia’s 36-16 loss to LSU Georgia rushing attack goes AWOL in battle at LSU         The post Georgia-LSU rewind: 3 momentum-changing plays in Bulldogs’ 36-16 loss appeared first on DawgNation.
  • The Atlanta Braves announced Monday that the organization has agreed to terms on a two-year contract for manager Brian Snitker. The contract does include a third-year club option for 2021.  Snitker took over as manager for the Braves in 2016 and led the team to their first National League East Division title in five years this season.  Here is the full statement from the Atlanta Braves: The Atlanta #Braves and manager Brian Snitker have agreed to terms on a two-year contract with a club option for the 2021 season: pic.twitter.com/CsReyEyU9x — Atlanta Braves (@Braves) October 15, 2018 TRENDING STORIES: Georgia already topping list for flu activity in the nation President Trump to view storm damage in Georgia Atlanta police seize drugs and guns from a popular food mart Snitker has been with the Braves organization for 43 seasons, including three seasons as manager for Triple-A club in Gwinnett.  The National League 'Manager of the Year' candidate, who turns 63 on Wednesday, owns a 221-227 (.493) record in his two-plus seasons. Information from our partners at The Atlanta Journal-Constitution was used in this report.
  • BATON ROUGE, La. — Dave Aranda is the highest paid coordinator in college football, and Saturday afternoon the LSU   defensive wizard earned his $2.5 million annual salary by throttling Georgia’s multifaceted offense. Tigers coach Ed Orgeron said in the days leading up to LSU’s 36-16 win over the Bulldogs that it would be a chess match, and the coaching moves from both staffs were on display. Georgia marched 60 yards on nine consecutive run plays on its second offensive series, displaying a dominant run game that seemed to bode well for the afternoon before an ill-fated fake field goal attempt changed the momentum. The Bulldogs managed just 17 yards on their next seven carries, LSU forcing three consecutive three-and-out series in pulling away to a 16-0 halftime lead. WATCH: LSU coach Ed Orgeron says physical football in Tigers’ DNA “You know they started running the football on us in the first quarter, (and) Dave (Aranda) made some adjustments,” Orgeron said. “Dave did a great job. We mixed up the personnel groupings that we use. We gave them some stuff that they didn’t see. Obviously, everything was built on stopping the run and the deep pass, and we did it. “We were playing one certain defense, and it wasn’t working. And we changed to play another one, and it worked.” Georgia, with its two-headed monster at quarterback, it’s four-man tailback platoon and double-digit receiver rotation, could not strike the right combination. The same versatility that has made the Bulldogs a tough matchup for an opponent worked against coach Kirby Smart — Georgia had no offensive identity to lean on when times got tough. “We were in four-open sets and we were running the ball really well and we drove down there and … we kind of stayed with that the next drive,” Smart said, asked why the Bulldogs abandoned the run. “We actually went back to it (the run). They changed some things up and it wasn’t working as well.” It put quarterback Jake Fromm in a difficult situation, with LSU running different looks than it had shown all year, making Georgia’s celebrated offensive line appear ineffective and overmatched at times. “We were just taking advantage of what they were giving to us,” said Fromm, who was sacked three times and pressured on several others, “and then they started kind of taking that away later in the game, and we started slinging the ball around a little bit.” Orgeron said the key  adjustment involved changing up the defensive fronts, creating different angles, with Aranda expertly mixing in different personnel to create problems for the Bulldogs. “We challenged our defensive line, especially (nose tackle) Ed Alexander,” Orgeron said. “That’s one of the best centers (Lamont Gaillard) we’ve seen. I thought he (Alexander) played one of his best games today. ” Smart said in the days leading up to the game he respected Aranda, his words foretelling. “ Dave Aranda is one of the premier defensive coordinators in the country, we look at what he does week to week, they do a tremendous job, always looking for new ideas, he’s a guy you look at,’ Smart said. “So for us, we’ve got to keep our quarterback’s upright. We’ve got to keep them in the pocket. Can’t get our offensive line confused.” It was clear by the end of the afternoon LSU was the better prepared team, its players out-executing what had been a very focused and dominant Georgia football team through the first half of the regular season. “ They played more physical than we did, they attacked us, they did a good job, they created turnovers, we didn’t do that, we didn’t protect the ball as good as we had,” Smart said, owning the defeat. “You can look at a lot of things, and I’m perfectly OK with that. We’re gonna look at a lot of things, and how we can get better.” Georgia dropped to No. 8 in the AP Top 25 poll with the loss, and No. 6 in the Coaches’ Poll. Georgia-LSU football DawgNation Georgia-LSU top-rated television game, Atlanta market shines Kirby Smart defends Jake Fromm at LSU Georgia football saw warning signs, couldn’t dodge Tigers’ trap Why didn’t Georgia use Justin Fields more? Report card: Bulldogs bomb midterm Georgia football stock report, LSU cashes in on Dawgs mistakes Instant analysis: Georgia melts in Louisiana heat against LSU Tigers came at Georgia for four downs on each series RECAP: Scoring, injuries, news from Georgia’s 36-16 loss to LSU Georgia planned ill-fated field goal early in the week Georgia rushing attack goes AWOL in battle at LSU   The post On the beat: LSU defensive wizard outschemed Georgia’s multifaceted offense appeared first on DawgNation.
  • Georgia eased past UNC Asheville, 20-7, in a 14-inning exhibition victory on Sunday afternoon in front of a crowd of 361 at Foley Field.  The visiting Bulldogs got on the scoreboard first, putting across three runs in the top of the second inning after a hit-by-pitch, walk and three singles.    Georgia wasted no time on answering with five runs in the bottom half of the inning. Riley King, Kaden Fowler, Patrick Sullivan led off the inning with consecutive doubles. After Tucker Maxwell reached on a bunt, Tucker Bradley cleared the bases with a home run shot into the trees beyond the right-center field wall.  Another five run inning followed for the Bulldogs in the third, giving Georgia a healthy 10-3 lead. Jon Cable and Sullivan scored on a wild pitch and passed ball, respectively, while a groundout roller to first by Fowler allowed King to score. The other two runs came off RBI singles from Cam Shepherd and LJ Talley.   At the extended seventh inning stretch, the score read 12-5. Georgia struck first after the reset with a RBI single from King that scored C.J. Smith. UNC Asheville scored two in the ninth inning to cut its deficit to 13-7.    Chaney Rogers found the right field bleachers off the bounce in the 11th for a RBI ground rule double that scored Talley.    King finished off his impressive day with a grand slam that landed in the camera stand just past the center field wall. King went 4 for 7 with two doubles and five RBIs. Bradley finished 3 for 5 with a home run, stolen base and three RBIs. Georgia amassed nine doubles on the day.   Georgia used 13 pitchers in which 10 threw a scoreless inning. Tim Elliot and Riley Crean registered three strikeouts each in their one inning of work. Darryn Pasqua closed out the day on the mound with two strikeouts in one inning.   The contest concluded the fall exhibition series, however the Bulldogs will compete in the annual Bulldog World Series, a three-game intersquad affair, occurring Nov. 2-4.  Coach's CornerIke Cousins Head Baseball Coach Scott Stricklin  On the run production today... 'I thought we had some really good at-bats early. Innings one-through-four, I thought our guys were pretty locked in. We had good at-bats – almost every single guy went in there and battled and had good at-bats. Late in the game we did that too. I think the first four innings and the last four innings, I thought we were awfully good offensively. We took advantage of some things that they gave us – we got some walks, and they made a couple errors. Good teams take advantage of those things, so I thought early and late we were very good offensively.'   On what to improve on as fall practice continues... 'The bottom line is we gave up too many free passes. We walked or hit 17 guys today. We played 14 innings, that's a long day, but that's too many free passes, and that's going to come back to haunt you. So we have to be better in the strike zone. A lot of young guys out there getting their first taste of college baseball, so it was to be expected a little bit, but that needs to clean up. We need to throw more strikes; we need to be more aggressive in the zone. If we do, I think our pitching staff can be really, really good, when we put everybody together. A lot of young guys went out there, with some mixed results. Some guys were very good, some guys have a lot of work to do. More than anything, we've got to throw strikes.' Player's Perspective RS-Soph. 3rd #31 Riley King  On his approach at the plate... 'Coach has been preaching staying even, and just going with your gut. Staying even, not trying to get too hot, not trying to get too low. Just going in there with a lot of confidence. It's been a big thing for me...this year, I'm going up there with a lot more confidence.'   On the benefit of fall scrimmages as a hitter... 'Every week, we see the same guys (on our team). So being able to see new arms is pretty good – seeing different arm slots, different angles. Just getting the confidence against other people. When you see the same guys over and over, they start learning you, so being able to see a new pitcher is a good experience for sure.”
  • ATHENS, Ga. — Kirby Smart made it clear Georgia football isn’t ready to go away, even after a 36-16 defeat at LSU that dropped the Bulldogs to No. 8 in the AP Top 25 rankings. “T he message for us is everything we want is in front of us,” Smart said. “The key for us is to move forward. We still have a good football team. We still have an opportunity to do everything we want to do. “Every opportunity that we had before this game is still in front of us. The margin of error is just smaller. We’ve got to get better.” The Bulldogs’ odds to win the College Football Playoff championship are sure to drop from where they were last Monday, at 7-to-1 per VegasInsider. But odds and betting lines aren’t always accurate indicators, as last Saturday’s game in Death Valley proved. Georgia (6-1, 4-1 SEC) was a 7-point favorite over LSU, largely based on the respect the team earned during its SEC championship season and College Football Playoff title game run of a year ago. This season’s UGA team has not beat an opponent that’s currently ranked in the Top 25 The Bulldogs lost several key pieces and rank as the youngest team in the SEC with more than two-thirds of the roster (68 percent) freshmen or sophomores. Still, Georgia controls its own destiny, with showdowns against Florida in Jacksonville on Oct. 27 and at Kentucky on Nov. 3. “W e’re a team, and that we’re going to bounce back from this,” Smart told his team following the loss in Tiger Stadium Saturday night. “This is very similar to last year (losing at Auburn), we probably played better leading up to our loss last year, I didn’t think we had played as well this year.” SEC East Division co-leader and No. 11-ranked Florida (6-1, 4-1), like Georgia, has a bye this week. But upstart Kentucky (5-1, 3-1), ranked No. 14, is in action against Vanderbilt in a 7:30 p.m. game in Lexington. The Wildcats have opened as an 11 1/2-point favorite over the Commodores, according to VegasInsider.com. Vanderbilt was a hard-luck loser in Nashville on Saturday to Florida, 37-27. Kentucky, like Georgia, controls its own destiny having defeat the Gators 27-16 in Week 2. The Wildcats, whose only SEC defeat came at Texas A&M, play at Missouri on Oct. 27 leading up to their showdown with the Bulldogs. Here is the line for all of the SEC football games this week: Vanderbilt at Kentucky (-11 1/2) Alabama at Tennessee (TBA) Tulsa at Arkansas (TBA) Memphis at Missouri (-7) Auburn (-2 1/2) at Ole Miss Mississippi State at LSU (-6 1/2)   The post Georgia football odds for title diminish with loss, but Bulldogs control destiny appeared first on DawgNation.