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Bo Dukes sentenced to 25 years for covering up Tara Grinstead's murder

Bo Dukes sentenced to 25 years for covering up Tara Grinstead's murder

The man accused of helping burn the body of a south Georgia teacher asked for forgiveness as he was sentenced.  Bo Dukes was found guilty Thursday of lying to authorities in the Tara Grinstead case. Dukes' attorney didn't want to speak to Channel 2’s Tony Thomas as he walked out of court Friday following sentencing, but he sent Thomas an email that read, “While we appreciate the jury’s service we do not agree with the verdict reached and are weighing all appellate options.” That statement was greatly different than Dukes’ tone inside court.  [READ: Who is Tara Grinstead?] “I was more interested in self-pity and self-preservation than doing the right thing for Tara and for you. I pray for your forgiveness,” Dukes told the court Friday morning.  Grinstead’s family stared at Dukes as he directed his comments at them.  For years, Dukes had lied to investigators as they tried to solve Grinstead’s disappearance from Irwin County in 2005.  RELATED STORIES: Leaked confession reveals motive behind Tara Grinstead's murder, GBI says Judge considers removing gag order in Tara Grinstead case Man accused of murdering former beauty queen talks about alleged 'confession' Dukes said his friend, Ryan Duke, killed her, and that he then helped Duke move and burn her body in a pecan field. “He watched whole communities in turmoil because Tara was missing,” Grinstead’s stepmother, Connie Grinstead, said. “He did nothing. He just went on living his life, not caring about the pain he caused others.” Connie Grinstead spared no words as she asked the judge to give Dukes the maximum sentence of 25 years, and he did. [READ MORE:  Bo Dukes, charged in Tara Grinstead case, in custody after 5-day manhunt, police say ] “I just can't quite wrap my head around what was done,” said Judge Robert Chasteen. Dukes' mother stood up for her son but admitted he had problems. She asked for rehabilitation. Dukes also faces charges in neighboring Ben Hill County, where Grinstead’s body was burned, and in Houston County on unrelated charges. “I want each of you to know I am truly remorseful. Thank you,” Dukes told the court. The man charged with the actual killing of Tara Grinstead, Duke, faces a trial starting April 1.

USG ,UNG react to President’s order on campus speech

USG ,UNG react to President’s order on campus speech

President Donald Trump said Thursday his administration will cut research funding to colleges and universities that violate the rights of student groups and people invited to speak or hold events on campus. “If a college or university doesn’t allow you to speak, we will not give them money. It’s very simple,” Trump said to applause before signing an executive order outlining the policy at the White House. Some conservative student groups and faith-based organizations in Georgia have won lawsuit settlements in recent years after filing complaints that schools illegally prevented them from speaking or posting displays on campus. State lawmakers passed legislationsponsored by Senate Republicans last year that requires, among other things, the Georgia Board of Regents submit an annual report detailing any violations of campus freedom of expression policies. The federal government awards an estimated $35 billion annually in research funding, Trump said. About $1 billion of those dollars comes to Georgia’s public and private colleges and universities. Critics characterized Trump’s order as a wrongheaded action that could have unintended consequences on faculty conducting research who have no involvement in such actions. “Federal research grants are given to professors and they don’t decide who gets to reserve a room for a ‘controversial speaker,’”said Matthew Boedy, an assistant professor of rhetoric and composition at the University of North Georgia. “And by the way, federal money also pays for programs that aid minorities on campus, first generation students, and nontraditional students such as veterans.” Trump said the executive order is one of several upcoming initiatives to protect student rights. The president also said his administration will present a plan requiring colleges and universities to share part of the financial risk of student loan debt as “an incentive to keep their costs down.” Trump did not elaborate on the plan. Federal student loan debthas tripled since 2007 to about $1.5 trillion, Trump administration officials have said. Thursday’s order will require schools to adhere to current grant award guidelines involving freedom of expression. Implementation and enforcement guidelines are being developed, officials said in a conference call with reporters. The University System of Georgia updated its policy in 2017 to ensure each campus provides high-traffic, accessible areas for speakers. The system released a statement Thursday highlighting those guidelines and ongoing policies to improve financial literacy. Trump signed his executive order the same day Emory University began a three-day conference exploring best practices for academic freedom and free speech on college campuses. The university also released a statement saying it will review Trump’s order “as we believe that robust discussions about important issues, including discourse about freedom of expression, is essential to our nation’s future.”

Opening weekend for Farmers Market

Opening weekend for Farmers Market

The Athens Farmers Market opens bright and early Saturday morning: it’s the 12th year for the farmers market in Bishop Park. Upwards of four dozen vendors are expected to take part in this year’s market. From Kimberly Davis, Athens Farmers Market… The 12th year of the Athens Farmers Market kicks off Saturday, March 23, from 8 a.m. to noon at Bishop Park.    Around 45 vendors will participate this year, said Market Manager Sarah Thurman. Exciting new vendors include Joe Nedza with Mad Dawg Doughnuts and the Bear Hug Honey Company.   “We love how the market has become a staple of a great Saturday in Athens and have been working to make it a more robust experience for the customer,” Thurman said.   In addition to the diverse selection of fresh produce (greens, turnips, rutabaga and more) and food and product vendors, the Athens Famers Market will also feature local arts and crafts vendors, children’s activities (including the Little Athens Pop-up Garden & Market), and collaborative painting of the music tent’s backdrop.   Furthermore, new, full-time Market Chef Landon Bubb will be on hand to offer cooking demos.   “Our chef will be preparing free, weekly meal plans that will be sent out in our weekly email and available at his cooking demo booth,” Thurman said. “He’ll be highlighting one of his weekly meals at the booth every Saturday so you can sample what his locally sourced, seasonal meals taste like and find the very products you need to make it at home within the market!”   Al produce is either Certified Naturally Grown or USDA Certified Organic, locally grown and sold by those who grow it, according to Thurman. The Athens Farmers Market runs through Dec. 21 at the Bishop Park location.   'We hope to see the market continue to become a more welcoming and inclusive space for all all,” Thurman said. “Our market will never be wholly strong and healthy until every member of our community feels like the market is their space.

Democrats call for quick public release of Mueller report Democrats on Friday quickly called for the release of details in Special Counsel Robert Mueller's report on Russian interference in the 2016 elections, and any ties to the campaign of President Donald Trump, as U.S. Attorney General William Barr told key lawmakers he could release some of the findings to Congress as soon as this weekend. 'Now that Special Counsel Mueller has submitted his report to the Attorney General, it is imperative for Mr. Barr to make the full report public and provide its underlying documentation and findings to Congress,' said House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and Senate Democratic Leader Charles Schumer in a joint statement. 'The Special Counsel's report must be provided to Congress immediately, and the Attorney General should swiftly prepare a declassified version of the report for the public,' said Sen. Mark Warner (D-VA), the top Democrat on the Senate Intelligence Committee.  'Nothing short of that will suffice,' Warner added, as Democrats quickly piled on to join that point of view. “The Attorney General should make the report public and let the American people learn the facts Mueller uncovered,” said Rep. Ted Deutch (D-FL).