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UGA’s Taylor: win a game, have a baby

UGA’s Taylor: win a game, have a baby

Joni Taylor coached the Lady Dogs to an 22-point win over Ole Miss last night. She gave birth this morning. Drew is 6 lbs 8 ounces and 20 inches long and Taylor tot No. 2. From UGA Sports Communications... Georgia Lady Bulldog basketball head coach Joni Taylor and her husband Darius welcomed their second child — Drew Simone Taylor — at 7:29 a.m. Tuesday in Athens.    Drew is 20 inches long and weighs 6 pounds, 8 ounces and both she and Joni are resting well. She is the Taylor’s second daughter. Jacie Elise Taylor was born on Nov. 3, 2016.    “Darius and I feel so blessed to be the parents of such a sweet little girl, and I know Jacie is thrilled to be a big sister,” Taylor said. “I can’t express how much joy Drew has already brought to our family. We want to thank everyone in the Georgia community for your prayers and encouragement during this happy season of our lives. I am thrilled that Drew will be surrounded by so many special people, and that she will be a part of the Bulldog family.”    Coach Taylor led Georgia to a 78-56 win against Ole Miss Monday evening, less than 12 hours before giving birth. Plans for her return to the Georgia bench will be announced at a later date.     Associate head coach Karen Lange will assume head coaching duties during Taylor’s absence. 

Two killed in Banks Co crash

Two killed in Banks Co crash

The Georgia State Patrol has released the names of the Athens man and Commerce woman who were killed in a Sunday crash in Banks County: Antwon Johnson and Laquesha Smith were both 27 years old. State Troopers say the two-vehicle accident happened at the intersection of Highways 59 and 164 in Banks County, where Johnson’s car apparently ran a stop sign. Troopers say there were no serious injuries in the second vehicle and no charges are expected to be filed.  The Georgia Supreme Court upholds the conviction and sentence in a White County murder case: Douglas Goodson is serving a life sentence for the shooting death of his cousin. Rodney Worley, who was killed in October of 2012 outside a home near Helen.  Police in Lawrenceville are searching for suspects in what looks to be a sophisticated bank fraud operation: they say an estimated $60,000 has been stolen from Gwinnett County credit unions. 

Supreme Court ruling stems from Athens case

Supreme Court ruling stems from Athens case

The Georgia Supreme Court on Monday struck down a portion of the state’s DUI law, ruling that a driver’s refusal to take a breathalyzer test cannot be held against them in criminal court. The impact was immediate. Hours after the unanimous decision, prosecutors told police they should prepare to seek more warrants for blood and urine tests in order to combat drunk driving. Such a process could be cumbersome, especially in some rural areas of the state, law enforcement officials said. The state Legislature likely will try to rewrite the law to address the court’s concerns. The justices found that using a driver’s refusal to submit to a breath test against them at trial violates the Georgia Constitution’s protections against self-incrimination. They also affirmed a previous ruling that said it’s unconstitutional to force drivers to take the breath tests. “We acknowledge that the State has a considerable interest in prosecuting DUI offenses (and thereby deterring others), and that our decision today may make that task more difficult,” Justice Nels S.D. Peterson wrote in the opinion. “This Court cannot change the Georgia Constitution, even if we believe there may be good policy reasons for doing so; only the General Assembly and the people of Georgia may do that. And this Court cannot rewrite statutes.” Under the new ruling, when a driver won’t use a breathalyzer, police will instead need to get a warrant to take blood or urine tests which must be performed at appropriate medical facilities, said Pete Skandalakis, executive director of the Prosecuting Attorneys’ Council of Georgia. The impact will vary from place to place. In some counties, jails have workers who can do the tests. In others, cops will take drivers to a hospital. In some places, officers are set up to get warrants electronically. In other counties, cops may end up knocking on the doors of judges’ homes in the middle of the night to get a warrant to complete their traffic stops. “Law enforcement is just going to have to change their procedures. If you’ve been in law enforcement or prosecution a long time, you understand these things happen,” Skandalakis told The Atlanta Journal-Constitution. “I know law enforcement will do their job.” DUI enforcement is often complicated by drivers declining to use breath tests. Records from the state office of drivers services show the number of residents who had their licenses suspended for refusing to take the test was more than 11,000 in 2017. The number of DUI convictions was nearly 23,000. The high court’s decision comes as a driver challenges a pending DUI case in Clarke County. In August 2015, an officer with Athens-Clarke County Police pulled Andrea Elliot over after allegedly seeing her commit several traffic violations, including failing to maintain a lane. Elliot admitted she’d had alcohol earlier in the day. The officer, allegedly smelling booze and seeing signs of impairment, arrested her and read her Georgia’s so-called “implied consent notice.” The notice lets a driver know his or her refusal to submit to testing “may be offered into evidence against you at trial.” She refused. Her attorney, Greg Willis, submitted a motion in Clarke County, arguing that using the refusal at trial would be unconstitutional. The local court ruled against him and he appealed to the state’s highest court. Willis framed Monday’s victory as one not just for his client but for all Georgians’ rights against self-incrimination. “What kind of right is it if you cannot exercise it?” he told the AJC. “I think it’s plain and simple, black letter law.” Because the implied consent notice must now be rewritten, Skandalakis said the Prosecuting Attorneys’ Council of Georgia is recommending police stop using it altogether. Instead, the council recommends officers read drivers’ their Miranda rights and then ask if they’ll take a breath test. If that doesn’t work, the officer should get a warrant to obtain blood or urine, the council said in a memo sent to prosecutors across the state on Monday. By taking up the case, the court was agreeing to consider whether it had correctly decided a 2017 ruling that said drivers can’t be forced to submit to breath tests. In Monday’s decision, the justices stood by the previous ruling, saying forcing a person to take a breath test constitutes forcing them to conduct a potentially incriminating act. The ruling doesn’t apply to blood or urine, essentially because a blood or urine test doesn’t require a driver to perform an action — such as blowing firmly into the breathalyzer — and instead only requires the person to allow their blood or urine drawn, according to the Prosecuting Attorneys’ Council of Georgia. Dwayne Orrick, assistant executive director of the Georgia Association of Chiefs of Police, said the ruling will make things more difficult for officers, particularly in rural areas where getting a warrant can take longer. Orrick, who’s worked in the South Georgia city of Cordele and in Roswell, said it might take up to three hours in the country to get blood from a suspect, time during which the suspect’s body is metabolizing alcohol. But even so, he expects officers to adjust and continue documenting other evidence needed for a prosecution: how the suspect drives, behaves, speaks, etc. In his experience, it has always been a good idea to build a case without relying solely breath test. In Athens-Clarke County, Solicitor C.R. Chisholm, whose office was on the losing end of Monday’s ruling, is recommending officers ditch breath tests altogether, at least until the law is clarified. Instead, he’s asking officers in the county to seek blood samples in all DUI investigations. “We knew if the decision was not in our favor we would have to go this route,” he told the AJC. He said his understanding was that Athens-Clarke County Police would be taking the recommendation. It wasn’t yet clear how Georgia State Patrol troopers, who patrol the county as well as the rest of Georgia, would respond to the ruling. But there was much uncertainty Monday. Would the ruling lead to people who’d been convicted of DUI to appeal? Perhaps, said Skandalakis, though he thought that could be a tough row to hoe if the defendant hadn’t brought up implied consent during their prosecution. Would the ruling affect pending prosecutions? Marietta attorney Kim Keheley Frye said she expected the ruling to touch “every single” pending case and “severely limit” prosecutors and “refusal cases.” Justice Michael P. Boggs said the decision would not prevent refusal to take a breath test from being used in an “administrative” proceeding to suspend a person’s license. But, he added, because the ruling’s implications will be vast, legislators may still want to tweak the law to make sure it has the effects desired. It wasn’t clear if lawmakers would try to change the law or embark on a push to change the state constitution, though they theoretically would still have time in the current legislative session. Gov. Brian Kemp told Channel 2 Action News his office would be talking to state legislators “in the coming days to get a game plan and see exactly what’s going to be needed.” Skandalakis said he didn’t expect an appeal of the ruling because the state high court is the authority on interpreting the state constitution.

Roger Stone ordered to explain posted photo of federal judge

A day after posting a photograph online of a federal judge which included a crosshairs near her head, U.S. District Judge Amy Berman Jackson ordered Roger Stone to appear at a Thursday hearing to explain what he was doing, and whether it should impact restrictions imposed on Stone about charges brought against him in the investigation of Russian interference in the 2016 elections, and any ties to the Trump campaign.

In an order issued Tuesday morning, U.S. District Judge Amy Berman Jackson summoned Stone to explain “why the media contact order entered in this case and/or his conditions of release should [More]