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Privacy Policy
Last Updated: August 4, 2014

Thank you for visiting this website, which is operated by an Affiliate of Cox Media Group, LLC (“CMG”). This site is one of a network of ad-supported sites operated by Affiliates of CMG each of which also operates a local newspaper, a local television station or a local radio station (each a “CMG Affiliate Site” and, collectively, the “CMG Network of Sites”). Each CMG Affiliate Site has adopted this privacy statement to the extent applicable. “Affiliate” means a company controlling, controlled by or under common control with another company.

This privacy statement is provided by the CMG Affiliate that operates this website (“we,” “us” or “our”) to explain the ways in which we collect information from you through your use of this site and any services offered through this website and any of our applications or mobile applications (collectively, the “Service”), and the ways that we and the other CMG Affiliate Sites may use that information. This privacy statement does not apply to any information you may provide to us through other means; for example, at a live event, via mail, or via telephone. Please read this privacy statement carefully so that you understand our online privacy practices. By using our Service, you agree that your use, and any dispute over our online privacy practices, is governed by this privacy statement and our visitor agreement. If you have questions regarding privacy issues, please contact us at privacy@coxinc.com.

YOUR CALIFORNIA PRIVACY RIGHTS

California law allows California residents, once a year and free of charge, to request information about certain types of personal information (if any) that a business has disclosed to third parties for their direct marketing purposes in the prior calendar year. However, under the law, we are not required to provide this information as long as we: (1) notify you of that you have the right to prevent disclosure of personal information, and (2) provide you with a cost-free means to exercise that right. As noted in this Privacy Statement, we require California residents to opt-in to activities where we would share their personal information with third parties for those third parties’ direct marketing purposes. If you are a California resident and you would like to prevent disclosure of your personal information for use in direct marketing by a third party, do not opt-in to participate in these activities. If you are a California resident, and you have opted in to one of these activities, but you later decide that you would like to prevent our disclosure of your personal information to third parties for their direct marketing purposes, please contact us.

TYPES OF INFORMATION WE COLLECT

Overview. The information we gather generally falls into one of two categories: (1) information (for example, your name and address) that you voluntarily supply when you register with our Service, initiate transactions on or through the Service (such as buying products or services through the Service), or when you participate in the features we offer through the Service (such as comments posted on a blog, discussion group, or other social networking features on the Service), and (2) information gathered on usage patterns and preferences as visitors navigate through our Service. In some cases, one of our agents or Affiliates may collect the information on our behalf. Third party Service Providers (as defined below) that provide all or some of the services available through this Service also may be gathering the same kinds of information.

Registration Information. To make use of certain features available through this Service (such as to receive email newsletters, to post a classified ad, or to participate in some social networking features) you may need to register and to provide certain information as part of the registration process. (If permitted by this Service, you may be able to bypass some of the steps within the registration process by using your user name and password associated with your account on certain specified social networking sites when you register for our Service, but you will still have to complete the registration process after entering that information.) We or our Service Providers may also ask for information from you if you buy products or services or conduct other transactions via our Service. (We may ask, for example, for your name, email address, sex, age, zip code or credit card number, and we might request information on your interest in sports, personal finance, the performing arts, and the like.) The information you supply will help us to offer you more personalized features, to tailor our Service to your interests and make them more useful to you, and also may be used in the processing of e-commerce transactions. In addition, our Service Providers may provide us with additional personal information about you that you provide to them through your separate accounts with them as described in their own privacy statements.

The more you tell us about yourself, the more value we can offer you. Supplying such information is entirely voluntary. But if you don't supply the information we request, we may be unable to provide you with services we make available to other users of our Service. For instance, we can't send you email alerting you to a new service we're offering, or breaking news that may interest you, if you don't tell us what you're interested in and give us your email address.

Contests and Other Promotions. From time to time, we may offer contests, sweepstakes or other promotions via our Service. If you enter one of these contests, sweepstakes or promotions, you'll have to provide information about yourself (such as your name, address, telephone number and email address) so that we can administer and operate the contest, sweepstakes, or promotion (including contacting you if you win, fulfilling a prize, and publishing a winners’ list). If you don't want us to collect the information requested in the registration form or to provide it to any of our Affiliates, Service Providers and co-sponsor(s) as described below, please do not enter the contest, sweepstakes or promotion.

Email Newsletters. We may also offer you the opportunity to subscribe to email newsletters that we make available through the Service. If you have opted to receive a particular newsletter, you may always unsubscribe later if you decide not to receive further mailings of the newsletter from us. See "Opting In/Opting Out" below.

Cookies. To help make our sites more responsive to the needs and interests of our visitors, we keep track of the pages visited by our users by placing a cookie, a small entry in a text file, on your hard drive. Our advertisers and Service Providers may also assign their own cookies to your browser, which is a process that we don't control.

We use cookies to help us tailor our site to your needs and to deliver a better, more personalized service. For example, we may use cookies to personalize the ads you see on our Service or to avoid showing you the same ad repeatedly during a single visit. In addition, we may use cookies to track the pages on our Service, the CMG Network of Sites, or other sites visited by our users. We may also use cookies to measure site performance and/or advertising performance. We can build a better Service if we know which pages our users are visiting and how often. You can manage your browser’s cookie setting through the “options” menu on most commercially available web browsers, including options to set your browser to notify you before accepting a cookie or to disable cookies entirely. Of course, if you set your browser not to accept cookies, you may not be able to take advantage of the personalized features enjoyed by other users of our Service.

Web Beacons. Our Service may contain electronic images (called "single-pixel GIFs" or "web beacons") or other tools that allow us and our Affiliates, Service Providers, vendors and, where necessary, our advertisers to count users who have visited particular pages of this Service, the CMG Network of Sites, or other sites or applications, or to access certain cookies. We may use these tools and other technologies to recognize which the links visitors click and to track how users respond to ads we place on third-party sites or applications. These features may also be included in our email newsletters so that we can learn which messages have been opened and acted upon. In combination with cookies, these web beacons allow us (and/or our Affiliates, Service Providers, vendors, or advertisers) to track the number of users who view particular pages and to fine tune the advertising messages delivered to users of this Service and other websites and applications. We may use "clickstream" data collected using web beacons and cookies to help us tailor promotional content, including such content in email messages and on landing pages, to the perceived interests of our users. Advertising networks with which we are affiliated and third-party advertising services that we use may also use web beacons on our Service to gather similar anonymous "clickstream" information, which is used to fine tune advertising messages delivered to our visitors and visitors to other websites.

Browser Level Information and IP Addresses. Our web servers automatically collect limited information about your computer configuration or your mobile device when you use our Service, including the type of browser software you use, the operating system you're running, the resolution of your computer monitor or mobile device, the website that referred you, the type of device you’re using, and your IP address. (Your IP address is a numerical address that is used by computers and mobile devices connected to the Internet to identify your computer or mobile device so that data (such as the web pages you want to view) can be transmitted to you. We also use IP address information for systems administration and troubleshooting purposes. Your IP address alone does not tell us who you are.) We use this information to deliver our web pages to you upon request, to tailor our Service (including ads distributed through our Service) to the interests of our users, and to measure traffic within our Service.

Social Networks. When you use the social networking features on our Service, you may be asked to log in to a social network using your social network credentials (for example, your Facebook user ID). When you log in, we may collect information about you (including personal information) from that social network. In addition, when you use one of the social network sharing tools available on our Service, the social network operating the tool may collect information about you based on such use. The social network’s use of that information will be subject to its own privacy policy, which may be different from ours.

Non-Personally Identifying Information. This website uses Google Analytics to help analyze how users use the site. Google Analytics is a web analysis service provided by Google. Google utilizes the data collected to track and examine the use of www.massport.com, to prepare reports on its activities and share them with other Google services. Google may use the data collected to contextualize and personalize the ads of its own advertising network. Google Analytics features implemented on this site include Display Advertising (Demographics and Interest Reporting).  We use data from Google's Interest-based advertising or 3rd-party audience data (such as age, gender and interests) with Google Analytics only to maintain this site’s functionality, responsiveness and improve content.  CMG uses the Google Analytics Demographics and Interest Reporting feature to identify trends in the usage of its website which may be published in reports for internal use.  Google’s ability to use and share information collected by Google Analytics regarding your visits to this site is restricted by the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy.  You may opt-out of Google Analytics for Display Advertising and customer Display Network ads using Ads Settings.

The Google Analytics tool uses “cookies” which are text files placed on your computer, to collect standard internet log information and visitor behavior information in an anonymous form. The information generated by the cookie about your use of the website (including IP address) is transmitted to Google. This information is then used to evaluate visitors’ use of the website and to compile statistical reports on website activity. At any time, you may choose to opt-out of Google Analytics tracking with the Google Analytics opt-out browser add-on. 

Information You Post. Please remember that anything you post to any message boards, discussion or comment areas, or social networking services on our Service can be seen, collected, and used by anyone who has access to that board, area, or social networking service. We cannot control how your postings may be used by third parties with such access.

Statistical Information. Much of the information we collect is in the form of aggregated statistics, such as the traffic that visits various pages within our Service, and the habits and preferences of our audience. Such aggregated information does not include any information that would identify you personally. We may use such aggregated information and disclose it to any third parties as we see fit.

Mobile Applications and Location-Based Information. Our Service may have the ability to use your geographic location to deliver content, services, and advertising tailored to your location. If you choose to enable our Service to use your location information, then that information will be stored and used to deliver content, services, and advertising tailored to your location. Also, when you use a mobile device or browser to access our Service, then your device and/or your browser may automatically collect and/or transmit your device’s unique identifier, IP address, location information, device make/model, wireless provider, and related information to us and our Service Providers. We and our Service Providers may use this information to deliver content, services, and advertising tailored to your location.

 

Data Collected in Connection with Ad Serving and Targeting. We use third-party Service Providers, such as ad networks, to serve advertising to you when you use our Service or use other sites or applications. These Service Providers may use information about your activities while you navigate through and use this Service and other web sites and applications (and that the Service Providers collect through cookies) to provide you with advertisements about products and services that they think may be of interest to you. The information used by these Service Providers for these purposes generally does not identify you personally (in other words, the Service Providers are not usually using your name, address, email address, or phone number for these purposes, although they may use your IP address, your geographic location, or your device’s unique identifier). You can learn more about such data collection practices, and/or opt out of any use by our Service Providers’ of cookies to tailor advertising to your interests, by visiting aboutads.info.

CMG’s Adherence to Self-Regulatory Principles for Online Behavioral Advertising. CMG adheres to the Self-Regulatory Principles for Online Behavioral Advertising of the Digital Advertising Alliance. To learn more about the Principles and your choices when it comes to the use of online behavioral advertising data by advertisers and ad servers across the Internet, visit aboutads.info.

DISCLOSURE OF INFORMATION

Why We Collect Information From You. Like any business, it's important for us to know our customers -- their needs, their likes, what they want and expect from us. Unlike most businesses, however, we deliver a valuable product to our customers without asking for anything in return. Since we make most of this Service available without charge to you, we rely heavily on advertisers to produce the income necessary to operate our Service. Advertisers are like most people: They expect something in return for the money they spend. They want to know how many people will see their ad and how often our users are looking at their ads on our Service -- in other words, how effective their ad is likely to be. So it's important that we be able to tell advertisers who our audience is. Except as expressly set forth in this privacy statement, we will not provide, sell or rent to any third party any personally identifying information that we collect from you through your use of this Service.

Advertisers. Without your permission, we will not share the personally-identifying information you provide when registering on our Service with advertisers. We may, however, take the information you provide and aggregate it with data from all the other people that use this Service and associated services. Then we will use that pool of information to inform our advertisers about our audience without identifying you personally.

Service Providers. All or portions of our Service may be provided or supported by our third-party service providers ("Service Providers"), and we may share any of the information that we collect from you through our Service (e.g., anonymous information collected through cookies on your browser, information you submit to us to enter a contest, sweepstakes or promotion offered through the Service, etc.) with such Service Providers. In the event we offer services through this Service such as chat, email newsletters, email services, online classifieds and/or similar services, such services may be made available through cooperative arrangements with providers that specialize in operating such services. In some instances, our Service Providers will have the same access to your information as we do. Their use of the information will be subject to the terms of their respective privacy policies.

Contest Co-Sponsors. If you enter any contest, sweepstakes or other promotion that we make available through this Service, we may share the information you submit to us with the co-sponsor(s) of the contest, sweepstakes, or promotion. We will identify any co-sponsor(s) in the official rules for the promotion.

Our Affiliates. We may share any of the information that we collect from you (including anonymous information and personally identifying information that you may provide) with the other CMG Affiliate Sites within the CMG Network of Sites so that we and they can provide you with products and services that may be of interest to you.

Sites to Which We Link. Our Service includes links to plenty of other websites, and provides access to products and services offered by third parties, whose privacy policies we don't control. When you access another site or purchase products or services or conduct other transactions through their sites, use of any information you provide is governed by the privacy statement of the operator of the site you're visiting or the provider of such products or services.

Other Disclosures. We reserve the right to release information about users of our Service when release is necessary or appropriate to comply with law, to enforce this privacy statement or our visitor agreement, or to protect the rights, property or safety of users of our Service, the public, our customers, or our company and its employees, agents, partners and Affiliates. As our business grows, we may buy or sell various assets. In the unlikely event that we merge with another entity or otherwise transfer substantially all of our assets to another entity (including, without limitation, to one of our Affiliates as part of an internal reorganization), information collected from this Service would be among the transferred assets.

SHOPPING

When you purchase products and/or services through our Service, we may ask you to provide us with certain information, including your contact details (such as your name, address, telephone and email), and your billing information (such as your credit card number and the date that your card expires). We may also ask you to provide additional information such as unique identifiers (such as your date of birth), and registration information (login name and password).

We will use the information you provide us to process your transaction and to contact you regarding your purchase if necessary. We will share this information with our Service Providers to the extent necessary to facilitate your purchase (for purposes such as customer service, verification, fulfillment and billing purposes). We will not sell or rent your personal billing information to any third party. We may share non-financial information with our Service Providers in accordance with this privacy statement.

OPTING IN/OPTING OUT

In certain places on this Service (for example, when registering as a user of this Service, managing your account, shopping, or participating in activities like promotional contests), we may ask you to consent to the sharing of your information with third parties with which we have business relationships. If you provide such consent (for example, by checking a box or by some other means), we will make your information available to such third parties as described in the consent form so that they, we, or both may contact you directly regarding special offers, promotions, products or services that may be of interest to you.

If you register with this Service, you will have the opportunity to review or update the information you have provided us at any time. You also have the option of deleting all information except for your email address. If you would like to completely deactivate your account, please contact us. Please note, however, that if you deactivate your account, you will not receive any newsletters from us and you will not be able to participate in any of our sweepstakes or contests. Also, even if you deactivate your account, you still need to go through a separate process to unsubscribe from any SMS alerts you previously signed up to receive. You can unsubscribe from these alerts by using the “STOP” function within those messages. You agree that, subject to applicable law, we may use your information to contact you for customer service, to inform you of important changes or additions to our Service or the services offered over our Service and to send you administrative notices or any communications relevant to your use of our Service.

If you have subscribed to one of our email newsletters, you will always have the opportunity to unsubscribe from future mailings (for example, by clicking on an unsubscribe link in an email newsletter or by modifying your account settings on our Service).

If you have submitted your information on a page provided in conjunction with one of our Service Providers, the information you submit may be jointly maintained by us and the Service Provider. If you decide to opt out of our Service, you may also need to contact the Service Provider separately to request the Service Provider to remove your information from its database.

DATA SECURITY

All information gathered through our Service is stored within database(s) operated by us or by a Service Provider on our behalf. We and/or our Service Providers secure the personally identifying information you provide on computer servers in a controlled, secure environment, protected from unauthorized access, use or disclosure. For e-commerce transactions where you provide sensitive financial data (e.g., credit card information) to us via this Service, we transmit your billing information using encryption. Encryption scrambles your credit card number and personal information. However, no security system is impenetrable. We cannot guarantee the security of our database, nor can we guarantee that information you supply won't be intercepted while being transmitted to us over the Internet.

A NOTE ABOUT CHILDREN'S PRIVACY

This Service is not directed at children under the age of 13, and we won't knowingly allow anyone under age 13 to register with our Service or to provide any other personally identifying information. If you’re under 13, please do not provide us with any personally identifying information about yourself (such as your name, your email address or your phone number). If we become aware that we have collected any personally identifying information from a user under the age of 13, we will remove such information from our records as soon as possible.

CHANGES TO THIS PRIVACY STATEMENT

We may change the terms of this privacy statement or introduce new terms and conditions from time to time, in which case we will post an updated version of this privacy statement on this Service and will update the “Last Updated” date above to reflect the date the changes take effect. By continuing to use this Service after we post any such changes, you accept this privacy statement, as modified.

Local News

  • Kirby Smart’s Georgia Bulldogs maintained their SEC dominance Saturday at Missouri, but a tough road game that the Dawgs couldn’t put away until late in the fourth quarter also revealed some concerns that need fixing if UGA is to live up to expectations. Georgia came into the game knowing that defending against quarterback Drew Lock and his high-powered passing game would be a challenge. Lock completed a lot of passes Saturday, but none of them was for a touchdown, so mark that down as mission accomplished for the Dawgs’ D. Tyson Campbell returns a Missouri fumble for a touchdown during the first half Saturday in Columbia, Mo. (Curtis Compton/AJC) That’s particularly impressive considering that starting cornerback Tyson Campbell, who scooped up a fumble in the first quarter and returned it 64 yards for a score, had to leave the game with a hurt shoulder and dehydration, and was replaced by backup Eric Stokes, who wound up with 3 pass breakups and 4 tackles. (Stokes also was one of the game’s heroes, blocking a second-quarter punt and returning it 8 yards for a touchdown.) However, Mizzou’s resurgent rushing attack proved surprisingly tough to stop (the Tigers scored all four of their touchdowns on runs), with the middle of the Georgia defense looking soft against the ground game, and the continual shuffling of players on the D-line seeming to indicate the coaching staff hasn’t yet solved that puzzle. Mizzou ended up averaging 4.6 yards per run, exactly the same as the acclaimed Georgia rushing attack. The defensive front still doesn’t appear to have gelled; it’s notable that the Dawgs’ leading tacklers on this day were all defensive backs: J.R. Reed (8), Deandre Baker (7) and Richard LeCounte (7). On the other side of the ball, a better-than-expected Tigers defense and an unfocused performance by Jake Fromm and his troops combined to keep the Georgia offense off the scoreboard in the first half. Georgia’s 20-7 halftime lead came courtesy of the defense and special teams. The Dawgs’ explosive offense responded positively to Smart’s “wake up” call at halftime and got back on track. But, even then, Mizzou’s ability to keep chipping away at Georgia’s defense allowed them to hang around as a threat until well into the fourth quarter. As usual with these Dawgs, big plays were the key to the win. Besides the fumble return and the blocked punt that both turned into TDs, Fromm bounced back from going 3-for-9 with an interception in the first half by turning in a second-half performance that included TD passes of 33, 61 and 54 yards. The 61-yarder to J.J. Holloman was a perfect back-shoulder throw by Fromm. On the day, he was 13-of-23 passing for 260 yards, with 3 touchdowns and an interception (which wasn’t his fault; a defender grabbed the ball out of receiver Mecole Hardman’s hands). Eric Stokes celebrates after returning a blocked a punt for a touchdown. (Curtis Compton/AJC) Still, in the end, it was those nonoffensive scores that made the difference for UGA in the 43-29 win. No wonder that Smart sounded as much relieved as he did elated when he spoke with the Bulldogs radio network’s Chuck Dowdle after the game. “We struggled to stop the run and struggled to run the ball,” the Georgia head coach noted. He cited a lack of composure and discipline, adding: “I’m disappointed. We’ve got a lot of things to clean up.” Speaking of things that need cleaning up, besides the troubles stopping the run and too many penalties (7 for 66 yards), Georgia’s offense was poor at third-down conversions, making only 3 of 12. Particularly in need of improvement is the short-yardage game, with the Dawgs having trouble sometimes converting third-and-short and fourth-and-1. Jim Chaney’s play-calling on some drives was ultra conservative, with too many runs up the middle that didn’t get much. Georgia seemed to have more success on the outside, where they could capitalize on their superior team speed. Other times, it wasn’t so much the play-calling as it was Fromm seeming to opt into the wrong play. On one drive in the second quarter, it was third-and-6 and Fromm gave it to Swift, who got very little. With the Tigers in man coverage and the safeties cheating up, a pass likely would have been more successful. Another time, later in the quarter, it was third-and-10, and a run by Swift got about 4 yards. One thing we did find out Saturday was that Georgia does indeed have a red-zone package for Justin Fields. The freshman dual-threat backup QB came in for just one play in the red zone in the second quarter, a short gain on a keeper. The verdict is still out on the effectiveness of that strategy. Otherwise, Fields didn’t play against Mizzou. Besides Fromm in the second half, who looked good for the Dawgs? Riley Ridley, who made 5 catches for 87 yards and one touchdown. One of those catches was a crucial 27-yarder in the fourth quarter that allowed the Dawgs to kill a bunch of clock. Also on offense, the running game may not have been as imposing as most folks expected, but Elijah Holyfield racked up 90 yards on 14 carries while starter D’Andre Swift had 71 yards on 16 runs. It looks like these two really are sort of 1A and 1B (like Nick Chubb and Sony Michel were last year), and, based on the past couple of games, I’d say Holyfield deserves to be considered 1A. As for Swift, who was barely used against Middle Tennessee the previous week amid reports he was having some groin trouble, the Philly flash showed no obvious limitations, but didn’t seem to have quite the burst he had last year, either. D’Andre Swift runs against a better-than-expected Missouri defense. (Curtis Compton/AJC) The offensive line had a rough day, with Andrew Thomas, who had just returned to the starting lineup after missing the MTSU game, apparently reinjuring himself, and right guard  Ben Cleveland also leaving the game with what appeared to be a left leg injury. Still, Georgia ended the day with 445 yards of total offense to Missouri’s 393. On defense, cornerback Deandre Baker smothered highly touted Mizzou receiver Emanuel Hall, who didn’t catch a ball all day (but who just had returned from his own groin injury, and didn’t appear to be at full speed). Also impressive was outside linebacker D’Andre Walker, who was a constant presence in the Tigers’ backfield, forcing fumbles on two sacks of Lock. Georgia scored 10 points off three Missouri turnovers, all in the first half, while the Tigers got no points off their one interception. Special teams play was a mixed bag. The blocked punt was big, Hardman had some nice return yards, and Rodrigo Blankenship made three field goals, but he missed another and had one attempt blocked when someone on the line missed an assignment. A stiff wind also put an end to Blankenship’s nation-leading string of touchbacks on kickoffs. The officiating was inconsistent. Georgia benefited from one video review (after Holloman became the latest Bulldog to drop the ball as he was crossing the goal line!) and lost out on another when a fumble recovery was ruled an incomplete pass. The officials hit Georgia with a couple of ticky-tacky calls on plays that didn’t really merit a flag, but completely missed a cheap-shot roughing of Fromm. Overall, any SEC road win is to be savored, and Georgia showed a resilience and ability to answer scores against Mizzou that was encouraging. Still, there’s no getting around the fact that there were signs aplenty in Saturday’s game that this banged-up Bulldogs team has a way to go before fans can start thinking about a return to the College Football Playoff. The post Tough win shows Georgia’s battered Bulldogs need to improve in key areas appeared first on DawgNation.
  • The Georgia Bulldogs head to Missouri  intent on making quarterback Drew Lock uncomfortable, whether that means recording a sack or not. Bulldogs linebacker Monty Rice made that clear in his media session this week at Butts-Mehre Heritage Hall when asked about the Bulldogs generating just one sack through three games. ADVERTISING “It’s not about getting sacks — sacks don’t win games,” Rice said. “It’s about getting pressure on the quarterback, making sure he’s not comfortable, getting him moving his feet.” The No. 2-ranked Georgia football program (3-0) will be facing arguably the best quarterback in the nation in Lock, who has led the Tigers to a 3-0 start and wins in nine of their past 10 games. “I’ve enjoyed my time so far these first three weeks,” Lock said on the SEC Network’s Paul Finebaum Show on Wednesday. “Getting UGA in here, being a big-time SEC game, it’s something Columbia needs.” The Bulldogs’ defense certainly won’t have stars in its eyes, having seen top quarterbacks the past two seasons. “Last year Baker Mayfield was an NFL quarterback,” Rice said, “so [Lock] is a person just like we are, he makes mistakes just like I do, so it’s not that big of a deal.” The Bulldogs are a two-touchdown favorite in what many believe could turn into a shootout. Georgia quarterback Jake Fromm is completing 80 percent of his passes this season with six touchdowns and one interception. The Bulldogs have been so dominant that Fromm has not played in a fourth quarter in the 2018 season. Lock and the Tigers could change that with their potent offense. While Georgia has allowed just two passes of 20 yards or more this season, Missouri has seven receivers who have caught passes of 20 yards or more in the first three games. Rice, who has played both of the inside linebacker positions in the Bulldogs’ 3-4, said taking away the Tigers’ run game is ultimately the key to getting to Lock. “It’s big because we’ve got some good stuff on third down that we can go to, that people won’t be able to block,” Rice said. “But if it’s third-and-2, we can’t run that.” Smart alluded to the same thing, pointing out that Missouri’s commitment to the run under first-year offensive coordinator Derek Dooley has led to favorable matchups for the receivers. “To have the commitment and play in the SEC, you’ve got to be able to run the ball,” Smart said, “and the last three games, their [Missouri’s] commitment to that has allowed them to get one on one matchups outside.” Smart pointed out that Middle Tennessee geared its scheme to get rid of the ball quickly, erasing opportunities for quarterback sacks. South Carolina and Austin Peay were similar, Jonathan Ledbetter said. “The teams that we’ve been playing, we haven’t been able to get a lot of pass rush, that is true, but we’ve been playing teams that have been doing a lot of quick game, the ball is out of the quarterbacks hands in under two seconds, so it’s hard to get to the quarterback,” Ledbetter said. “You have to find other ways to affect them, like batted balls and trying to break up passes with D-Linemen, just to help out the secondary in coverage.” Ledbetter said the Georgia defensive line will be intent on getting to Lock, but like Rice, he said the ultimate objective is to make Lock uncomfortable. “That’s really you can do, you try to get back there as fast as you can, have good pocket push, and the really the way to affect him is to make him step up and get uncomfortable in the pocket,” Ledbetter said, “that just comes with pass rush and everyone working together.”
  • Officials in Winterville say they are looking for people to serve on the Board of Directors for the Winterville Marigold Festival. Applications are on the Marigold Festival website; the deadline to apply is October 1. From the City of Winterville… The Winterville Marigold Festival, a 501(c)(3) non-profit corporation, is seeking applications for new Board of Directors members. Board members will actively participate in planning for the annual Marigold Festival and will be an integral part in the decisions surrounding annual funding of projects in the City. You do not have to reside in Winterville city limits to serve on this board. Applications are available on our website at: http://marigoldfestival.com/files/documents/BoardApplication_2018.pdf and are due by October 1, 2018. For more information about the Winterville Marigold Festival or this Board opportunity, email admin@marigoldfestival.com, visit our website at www.MarigoldFestival.com, or follow us on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/MarigoldFestival/
  • A man accused of shooting his friend in a Lake Oconee mansion said he was protecting himself at the time. In an exclusive interview at the jail with Channel 2's Mark Winne, Chad Haufler, 45, said he remembers the two had been drinking and had gotten into a fight but doesn't remember pulling the trigger. He called the shooting self-defense. 'I'm not denying that I did not do it,' Haufler told Winne.  Channel 2 Action News first told you about this story when the shooting happened on Aug. 29. NewsChopper 2 was above the scene of the mansion that day as officers scoured the yard of the large home for evidence. Crime scene tape roped off a large part of the home. Police said Haufler called 911 around 6:30 a.m. to report the shooting at his home on Jones Bluff Court in Reynolds at Lake Oconee. In the 911 call, Haufler said he had shot an intruder in his home. When deputies arrived, Marc Dimos, 51, was found dead in the basement. Greene County Sheriff Donnie Harrison Jr. said investigators didn't believe the invasion story and hours later, they charged Haufler with murder. In his interview with Winne, Haufler said Dimos was a friend of his that he met last year in Colorado during a hunting trip. 'We became close. We just clicked together. We became hunting buddies,' Haufler said. Haufler, a retired firefighter from Florida, said he has benefited from good family investments and was recently able to buy the large home on Lake Oconee. Haufler indicated he'd invited Dimos to his family's $1.9 million-plus vacation home. He said they spent time riding in the boat, eating at the Ritz-Carlton and hanging out in the pool, shooting the breeze, until things took a turn. Haufler suggests there is much he does not remember from the night of Aug. 26. Haufler: 'We were drinking.' Winne: 'Were you drunk?' Haufler: 'Yes.' Winne: 'Was Marc Dimos drunk also?' Haufler: 'I would assume so, yes. He was doing shots of tequila. I remember waking up on the floor and Marc has me in a chokehold and I can't breathe. And I remember struggling on the floor with him, fighting and wrestling. I had bruises all over my body and stuff.' Winne: 'You don’t know what caused this?' Haufler: 'I don’t know, I don’t know what caused this. I'd never had any foul words with Marc at all, ever. Winne: 'Where did the gun come from?' Haufler: 'I don’t know where it was.' Winne: 'Would you have been wearing the gun on you in your vacation home?' Haufler: 'No, but I would have a gun in my house.' Winne: 'Would you have had it in the basement?' Haufler: 'Could’ve been.'  When asked if this was a convenient loss of memory, Haufler said, 'Oh, I really wish I could remember. It hurts me every night. I wish I could recall the whole incident.' 
  • The state Board of Regents calls for millions of dollars in state funding for work on new facilities for the University of North Georgia: with the approval of the Georgia legislature, which convenes in January, UNG would get $13.6 million for work on the former campus of Lanier Technical College, which sits next to the main North Georgia campus in Gainesville. 

Bulldog News

  • COLUMBIA, Mo. — Georgia football coach Kirby Smart gave Missouri credit for stepping up and playing a good football game, but the Tigers say the Bulldogs didn’t see their best game. “If we play our A-game, we can compete with anyone in the country, and that’s something I believe in my soul,” Missouri quarterback Drew Lock told the St. Louis Post-Dispatch. “We felt like we beat ourselves.” The No. 2-ranked Georgia football program never trailed, taking a 20-7 lead into the halftime despite not getting an offensive touchdown until the second half. Missouri failed to cut the Bulldogs lead to single digits in the second half, and Lock struggled. Lock, who entered the game leading the SEC in passing, failed to throw a touchdown pass for the first time in a game in more than a year, finishing 23-of-48 for 221 yards with an interception and a lost fumble. Lock’s longest completion went for 25 yards, as Georgia All-American cornerback Deandre Baker erased previous SEC receiving leader Emanuel Hall, holding him without a catch. Still, the Tigers came away convinced they should have beaten Georgia. “It stings because it feels like we gave the game away,” Missouri offensive guard Kevin Pendleton told the St. Louis Post-Dispatch. “All the credit to Georgia. They’re a hell of a team, and they capitalized on a lot of opportunities. But it’s one that’s going to sting and one that we have to carry through the rest of the year so we can’t let this happen again.” Georgia finished with 445 total yards to Missouri’s 393, and quarterback Jake Fromm was 7-of-9 passing for 194 yards and three touchdowns in the second half alone. The Tigers’ defense said much of the Bulldogs’ success had to do with their errors. “We leave the game with a sour taste in our mouth just because of the self-inflicted wounds we put ourselves through,” Missouri linebacker Cale Garrett told the Kansas City Star. “I thought we had a genuine chance to win this game and had them on their heels at times. … “It’s a little bit frustrating to be that close to winning a game and then losing just because of things on our side.” Georgia-Missouri DawgNation coverage 5 things from Georgia win over Missouri: Red flags, orange alert Georgia coach Kirby Smart shares halftime message of 43-29 win Chip Towers Georgia football report card for Missouri Ben Cleveland among 4 Georgia football starters knocked out of Missouri game Jake Fromm happy to get best of Drew Lock in matchup Georgia football stock report for Missouri game Bulldogs freshman Eric Stokes comes through with game ball day Instant analysis: Second-half surge lifts Georgia football Georgia football recap: Real time scoring, breaking news and injuries Bulldogs’ corner Deandre Baker shuts out SEC’s leading receiver The post Missouri QB Drew Lock: ‘We beat ourselves’ in 43-29 loss to Georgia appeared first on DawgNation.
  • Kirby Smart’s Georgia Bulldogs maintained their SEC dominance Saturday at Missouri, but a tough road game that the Dawgs couldn’t put away until late in the fourth quarter also revealed some concerns that need fixing if UGA is to live up to expectations. Georgia came into the game knowing that defending against quarterback Drew Lock and his high-powered passing game would be a challenge. Lock completed a lot of passes Saturday, but none of them was for a touchdown, so mark that down as mission accomplished for the Dawgs’ D. Tyson Campbell returns a Missouri fumble for a touchdown during the first half Saturday in Columbia, Mo. (Curtis Compton/AJC) That’s particularly impressive considering that starting cornerback Tyson Campbell, who scooped up a fumble in the first quarter and returned it 64 yards for a score, had to leave the game with a hurt shoulder and dehydration, and was replaced by backup Eric Stokes, who wound up with 3 pass breakups and 4 tackles. (Stokes also was one of the game’s heroes, blocking a second-quarter punt and returning it 8 yards for a touchdown.) However, Mizzou’s resurgent rushing attack proved surprisingly tough to stop (the Tigers scored all four of their touchdowns on runs), with the middle of the Georgia defense looking soft against the ground game, and the continual shuffling of players on the D-line seeming to indicate the coaching staff hasn’t yet solved that puzzle. Mizzou ended up averaging 4.6 yards per run, exactly the same as the acclaimed Georgia rushing attack. The defensive front still doesn’t appear to have gelled; it’s notable that the Dawgs’ leading tacklers on this day were all defensive backs: J.R. Reed (8), Deandre Baker (7) and Richard LeCounte (7). On the other side of the ball, a better-than-expected Tigers defense and an unfocused performance by Jake Fromm and his troops combined to keep the Georgia offense off the scoreboard in the first half. Georgia’s 20-7 halftime lead came courtesy of the defense and special teams. The Dawgs’ explosive offense responded positively to Smart’s “wake up” call at halftime and got back on track. But, even then, Mizzou’s ability to keep chipping away at Georgia’s defense allowed them to hang around as a threat until well into the fourth quarter. As usual with these Dawgs, big plays were the key to the win. Besides the fumble return and the blocked punt that both turned into TDs, Fromm bounced back from going 3-for-9 with an interception in the first half by turning in a second-half performance that included TD passes of 33, 61 and 54 yards. The 61-yarder to J.J. Holloman was a perfect back-shoulder throw by Fromm. On the day, he was 13-of-23 passing for 260 yards, with 3 touchdowns and an interception (which wasn’t his fault; a defender grabbed the ball out of receiver Mecole Hardman’s hands). Eric Stokes celebrates after returning a blocked a punt for a touchdown. (Curtis Compton/AJC) Still, in the end, it was those nonoffensive scores that made the difference for UGA in the 43-29 win. No wonder that Smart sounded as much relieved as he did elated when he spoke with the Bulldogs radio network’s Chuck Dowdle after the game. “We struggled to stop the run and struggled to run the ball,” the Georgia head coach noted. He cited a lack of composure and discipline, adding: “I’m disappointed. We’ve got a lot of things to clean up.” Speaking of things that need cleaning up, besides the troubles stopping the run and too many penalties (7 for 66 yards), Georgia’s offense was poor at third-down conversions, making only 3 of 12. Particularly in need of improvement is the short-yardage game, with the Dawgs having trouble sometimes converting third-and-short and fourth-and-1. Jim Chaney’s play-calling on some drives was ultra conservative, with too many runs up the middle that didn’t get much. Georgia seemed to have more success on the outside, where they could capitalize on their superior team speed. Other times, it wasn’t so much the play-calling as it was Fromm seeming to opt into the wrong play. On one drive in the second quarter, it was third-and-6 and Fromm gave it to Swift, who got very little. With the Tigers in man coverage and the safeties cheating up, a pass likely would have been more successful. Another time, later in the quarter, it was third-and-10, and a run by Swift got about 4 yards. One thing we did find out Saturday was that Georgia does indeed have a red-zone package for Justin Fields. The freshman dual-threat backup QB came in for just one play in the red zone in the second quarter, a short gain on a keeper. The verdict is still out on the effectiveness of that strategy. Otherwise, Fields didn’t play against Mizzou. Besides Fromm in the second half, who looked good for the Dawgs? Riley Ridley, who made 5 catches for 87 yards and one touchdown. One of those catches was a crucial 27-yarder in the fourth quarter that allowed the Dawgs to kill a bunch of clock. Also on offense, the running game may not have been as imposing as most folks expected, but Elijah Holyfield racked up 90 yards on 14 carries while starter D’Andre Swift had 71 yards on 16 runs. It looks like these two really are sort of 1A and 1B (like Nick Chubb and Sony Michel were last year), and, based on the past couple of games, I’d say Holyfield deserves to be considered 1A. As for Swift, who was barely used against Middle Tennessee the previous week amid reports he was having some groin trouble, the Philly flash showed no obvious limitations, but didn’t seem to have quite the burst he had last year, either. D’Andre Swift runs against a better-than-expected Missouri defense. (Curtis Compton/AJC) The offensive line had a rough day, with Andrew Thomas, who had just returned to the starting lineup after missing the MTSU game, apparently reinjuring himself, and right guard  Ben Cleveland also leaving the game with what appeared to be a left leg injury. Still, Georgia ended the day with 445 yards of total offense to Missouri’s 393. On defense, cornerback Deandre Baker smothered highly touted Mizzou receiver Emanuel Hall, who didn’t catch a ball all day (but who just had returned from his own groin injury, and didn’t appear to be at full speed). Also impressive was outside linebacker D’Andre Walker, who was a constant presence in the Tigers’ backfield, forcing fumbles on two sacks of Lock. Georgia scored 10 points off three Missouri turnovers, all in the first half, while the Tigers got no points off their one interception. Special teams play was a mixed bag. The blocked punt was big, Hardman had some nice return yards, and Rodrigo Blankenship made three field goals, but he missed another and had one attempt blocked when someone on the line missed an assignment. A stiff wind also put an end to Blankenship’s nation-leading string of touchbacks on kickoffs. The officiating was inconsistent. Georgia benefited from one video review (after Holloman became the latest Bulldog to drop the ball as he was crossing the goal line!) and lost out on another when a fumble recovery was ruled an incomplete pass. The officials hit Georgia with a couple of ticky-tacky calls on plays that didn’t really merit a flag, but completely missed a cheap-shot roughing of Fromm. Overall, any SEC road win is to be savored, and Georgia showed a resilience and ability to answer scores against Mizzou that was encouraging. Still, there’s no getting around the fact that there were signs aplenty in Saturday’s game that this banged-up Bulldogs team has a way to go before fans can start thinking about a return to the College Football Playoff. The post Tough win shows Georgia’s battered Bulldogs need to improve in key areas appeared first on DawgNation.
  • COLUMBIA, Mo. — The Georgia football program left Missouri on Saturday afternoon saying it didn’t live up to the team’s self-imposed standard. The No. 2-ranked Bulldogs (4-0, 2-0 SEC) got the win, but it came at the cost of four starters getting knocked out of the game including what could be a season-ending leg injury to right guard Ben Cleveland. Here are 5 takeaways from the 43-29 victory over the Tigers (3-1, 0-1), and what it means moving forward. The Injuries Bettors might disagree, but the most impactful part of Saturday’s outcome was Georgia’s potential loss of starting right guard Ben Cleveland (leg) for the rest of the season. Smart’s report on injuries was preliminary, but he also said receiver Tyler Simmons could be out “two to three weeks” with an undisclosed injury. Starting left tackle Andrew Thomas was a surprise start who didn’t appear completely healthy in practice the week. Thomas appeared to re-injure his ankle and is questionable, at best, for the Tennessee game. Freshman cornerback Tyson Campbell suffered a shoulder subluxation and grew nauseated upon his return to the game. Smart said Campbell would be fine, but shoulder subluxations tend to be recurring, so it’s an injury that bears monitoring. Finally, inside linebacker Monty Rice was a pregame scratch, unable to overcome a knee injury (MCL) that Smart said has been troubling him in practice since the Middle Tennessee win on Sept. 15. The issues T he line play is something Smart is truly concerned about, particularly on defense. “If you asked me what was the one most disappointing thing, they were able to run the ball, especially in the low-red area,” Smart said. “It’s one thing to run it in the field, but they ran it in the low-red area, which is concerning for us, because that’s not who we are. “We had everybody in the box we could have in the box, we just didn’t play through people. They out-manned us down there.” The identity Smart made it clear that, despite some short-yardage struggles in the run game, there’s no plan to modify the base offense. “I thought we could get a yard when we had to and didn’t,” Smart said. “That’s something we’ll continue to do. That’s who we are. We’ve just got to get better at it.” Tailbacks Brian Herrien and Elijah Holyfield were both stopped on down-and-distance situations requiring just one yard, unable to generate anything without the help of Georgia’s suddenly-hobbled offensive line. The Bulldogs’ perimeter speed is what makes the offense elite, even without Cal transfer Demetris Robertson catching a pass or touching the ball since the opening game. The quarterbacks Jake Fromm finished Saturday’s game with great momentum, and Smart and offensive coordinator Jim Chaney showed they’re willing to use Justin Fields situationally. Fromm was 7-of-9 passing for 194 yards with three touchdowns in the second half at Missouri after a slow start, adhering to Smart’s halftime team message to “wake up.” Fields was inserted for one play in the second quarter, a first-down quarterback draw at the Missouri 7 yard line that generated 3 yards. Smart seemed to debunk the notion that Georgia might develop a package for Fields at the start of fall camp, saying he viewed his quarterbacks as similar enough to run the same offense. The future First South Carolina, then Missouri and now Kentucky is deemed the biggest threat to Georgia. But next, Tennessee, a program coming off a self-inflicted, six-turnover 47-21 loss to Florida. Jeremy Pruitt’s history with Georgia is somewhat controversial, most viewing his time with the Bulldogs as beneficial though divisive. It’s a well-time road trip for Pruitt’s Vols, who will arrive at Sanford Stadium with everything to gain and nothing to lose, hoping to recapture the magic that led them to wins over Georgia in 2015 and 2016. Meanwhile it’s a long season for the Bulldogs. With injuries adding up and a front seven that’s failing to measure up, Georgia needs to make good on Smart’s vow to improve each week if they’re to do anything more than win the SEC East Division. Georgia-Missouri DawgNation coverage Georgia coach Kirby Smart shares halftime message of 43-29 win Chip Towers Georgia football report card for Missouri Ben Cleveland among 4 Georgia football starters knocked out of Missouri game Jake Fromm happy to get best of Drew Lock in matchup Georgia football stock report for Missouri game Bulldogs freshman Eric Stokes comes through with game ball day Instant analysis: Second-half surge lifts Georgia football Georgia football recap: Real time scoring, breaking news and injuries Bulldogs’ corner Deandre Baker shuts out SEC’s leading receiver   The post Georgia football: 5 things moving forward, red flags, orange alert appeared first on DawgNation.
  • COLUMBIA, Mo. — Georgia quarterback Jake Fromm said it was a matter of the offense coming together in the second half, but it sure looked like it might have to do with taking deeper shots downfield. 4️⃣ for more ‼️ #GoDawgs #GeorgiaFootball pic.twitter.com/BgxLs1gPis — Georgia Football (@FootballUGA) September 23, 2018 Fromm was 13-of-23 passing for 260 yards with three touchdowns and an interception in the No. 2-ranked Bulldogs’ 43-29 win at Missouri on Saturday. First-half Fromm was 6-of-14 passing for 66 yards and an interception — but second-half Fromm was 7-of-9 passing for 194 yards with three touchdowns. “Coach talked to us and said, ‘Hey we have to get things going,’ and collectively, we got together and got things going,” Fromm said, asked about the second half surge. “We just came together as an offensive unit, really focused, really determined and striving toward that one goal.” The first half, Fromm said, was not up to par. “We left a lot of plays and a lot of points out there,” Fromm said. “So we needed to play better on offense in the first half, and just really execute better.” Fromm said “winning is a blessing,” but also, that he expects improvement moving forward. “We need to play better,” Fromm said. “We have a high standard here at the University of Georgia, so we need to come out and practice better this week, and play at the level we can play at.” Fromm entered the game 0-for-6 on third down conversions of third-and-10 or more. On the first instance of such Saturday, he threw an interception from the Missouri 39 in the first quarter. RELATED: Fuss with Jake Fromm through 3 games on third-and-long On the second circumstance on Saturday, a third-and-11 at the Missouri 42 in the fourth quarter, Fromm went downfield and found Riley Ridley for a 27-yard gain. Fromm was not sacked again Missouri despite the Bulldogs losing two starters to injuries in the game. Left tackle Andrew Thomas limped off in the fist quarter, and right guard Ben Cleveland was helped off the field by teammates after suffering what appeared to be a serious leg injury in the third quarter. “You hate to see any guy go down, but [no sacks] is a testament to our football team, it’s a next man up mentality,” Fromm said. “Coach [Sam] Pittman does a great job of   recruiting and then coaching as well, so we just roll guys in there and continue to play as a unit.” The Bulldogs play host to Tennessee at 3:30 p.m. Saturday at Sanford Stadium. Georgia football QB Jake Fromm   Georgia-Missouri DawgNation coverage Cornerback Deandre Baker shuts down SEC’s top WR at Missouri Georgia coach Kirby Smart shares halftime message of 43-29 win Ben Cleveland among 4 Georgia football starters knocked out of Missouri game Georgia football stock report for Missouri game Bulldogs freshman Eric Stokes comes through with game ball day Instant analysis: Second-half surge lifts Georgia football Georgia football recap: Real time scoring, breaking news and injuries   The post WATCH Georgia QB Jake Fromm: ‘We need to play better’ appeared first on DawgNation.
  • COLUMBIA — Georgia wins by two touchdowns on the road and the primary discussion after the game was what’s wrong with the Bulldogs. This is where Georgia is in year three under Kirby Smart. The No. 2-ranked Bulldogs beat Missouri 43-29 on Saturday at Faurot Field and did so with relative indifference. For sure, there were brief periods of angst and even a moment or two where the outcome was in doubt. But in the grander scheme, the Bulldogs didn’t come close to playing their best football and still won. There were penalties, missed kicks, missed blocks, blocked kick and squandered opportunities. Yet, there Georgia was late in the fourth quarter, running out the clock and taking a knee deep in Missouri territory as the clock expired. “We didn’t play with discipline, composure, really not much physicality when you look at the run game for us and stopping the run defensively,” Georgia coach Kirby Smart said. “But I am proud of the way we competed, proud of the way we were resilient. When they made a play, we came back and made a play. A lot of guys stepped up today.” A lot of guys had to step up because a lot of Bulldogs went down. Four starters left the game with injuries or illness — Andrew Thomas, Ben Cleveland, Tyson Campebell and Tyler Simmons — and yet Georgia never wavered and never trailed. It went ahead 27-7 early in the third quarter and the lead was never seriously threatened again. And this came against a team that may or not be the second-best in the division. Still, the Bulldogs were emphatic in the notion they can play much better. They can, and will need to remain in the playoff discussion. On to the grades: Offense: B It feels too generous to give the offense a good grade based on the team’s comments and remarks after the game. Quarterback Jake Fromm and his cohorts were extremely critical of their own work in the immediate aftermath. There were penalties, an interception, 10 incompletions and the most pedestrian ground game we’ve witnessed since last year’s regular-season game at Auburn. But then there was the good stuff, too. Like the three long scoring plays in the second half and Fromm’s 20-yard average per pass completion. Like Elijah Holyfield’s 90 yards on 14 carries. Like Riley Ridley’s 5 receptions for 87 yards. And most of this came with starting offensive linemen Andrew Thomas (ankle) and Ben Cleveland (lower leg) out of the game with leg injuries. Georgia’s final numbers were where they’ve been at the end of games all season, but just slightly skewed toward the pass: 443 total yards, 185 rushing, 260 passing. But that’s not particularly encouraging seeing what Purdue did against the same defense a week earlier (614 yards, 572 passing). Defense: B Again, 393 yards was a season high allowed by the Bulldogs, as was Missouri’s 26 first downs. But Georgia’s defenders also put another 7 spot on the scoreboard with a fumble-return touchdown by Campbell in the first quarter. And the Bulldogs kept heralded senior quarterback Drew Lock from throwing a touchdown pass for the first time in 13 games. Lock passed for an SEC record 44 touchdown passes last year. As for all those folks wondering aloud a “where’s the pressure,” Georgia’s defense answered emphatically with two sacks, three hurries and two forced fumbles. Senior outside linebacker D’Andre Walker had a hand in most of that, but so did interior linemen Julian Rochester, Jonathan Ledbetter and Tyler Clark. Meanwhile, playing without Campbell (shoulder, dehydration) for much of the game, Georgia’s secondary held its own against the best receiver corps it has seen so far. Redshirt freshman Eric Stokes stepped in for Campbell at corner and had four pass break-ups. Fellow corner Deandre Baker also shut out Missouri big-play wideout Emanuel Hall. Smart was not pleased with the Tigers’ 172 rushing yards and their general success on first down. And Missouri went 4-for-4 with four touchdowns in the red zone. Special teams: C Returner Mecole Hardman got the rare opportunity to bring a few kickoffs out of the end zone. He returned three of for 91 yards and added 23 yards on one punt return. Also, the Bulldogs landed the special teams’ holy grail — a blocked-kick touchdown. Eric Stokes blocked a punt with his facemask and returned the ball eight yards for a score. Meanwhile, place-kicker Rodrigo Blankenship had three more field goals and recorded his resident seven touchbacks on kickoffs. But Blankenship also missed a 49-yard kick wide right and had another field-goal attempt blocked. Blankenship had his consecutive touchback streak of 23 in a row this season end. Jake Camarda averaged 41 yards on two punts, but he got away with one skied shank, which ended on a favorable roll. Overall, not bad, but average for a group that usually dominates the opponent. Coaching: B Georgia seemed to have a good game plan for Missouri. The Bulldogs wanted to be aggressive in every way and were. They won the opening coin toss and elected to receive, which was out of character.  Then they took risks, throwing more deep balls on offense and occasionally blitzing to get pressure on Lock. Georgia did not record a first-half offensive touchdown, however, and was 0-for-3 getting in the end zone from the red zone. On first-and-goal from the 7, the Bulldogs brought in quarterback Justin Fields, who ran a quarterback draw for three yards on first down and then left the game for good. And then Jake Fromm was asked to throw on two straight deep corner patterns, which failed. Once again, halftime adjustments resulted in second-half dividends. The Bulldogs scored touchdowns on their first two possessions of the third quarter and again on the first play of the fourth quarter. But Missouri matched them with two third-quarter scores as well. The Bulldogs were flagged for seven times for 66 yards in penalties. Smart bemoaned Georgia’s  lack of “discipline and composure” Saturday and said, “that’s on me.” Overall: B Again, it’s good any time you can win a divisional conference game by two touchdowns on the road. But with a No. 2 national ranking and early College Football Playoff projections, the Bulldogs are now going to be compared to the best the teams in the country. Right now the No. 1 team is Alabama, and Georgia hasn’t looked like it could compete with the Crimson Tide. The good news is Georgia has yet to play at peak level and the Bulldogs’ coaches will return to Athens with many “teaching moments” to go over. This remains the SEC’s youngest team and the 15th youngest in the country, with 68.2 percent freshmen and sophomores. So there is certainly time and opportunity for continued improvement. DawgNation coverage of Georgia-Missouri: Georgia QB Jake admittedly pleased to get edge on buddy Drew Lock Postgame Injury Report: 4 starters have to leave game with injuries INSTANT ANALYSIS: Another 2nd-half surge for Bulldogs puts away Missouri, 43-29 Bulldogs’ Deandre Baker shuts out SEC’s top receiver Heads-up play by Eric Stokes benefits Georgia on defense, special teams Stock Report: Georgia cashes in on Missouri turnovers Georgia coach Kirby Smart shares halftime message vs. Missouri WATCH: Georgia’s D’Andre Walker doubles down on sacks DawgNation Pregame: Georgia fans turn out big at Missouri’s Memorial Stadium         The post Report card: Along with victory, Georgia returns from Missouri with many ‘teaching moments’ appeared first on DawgNation.