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Visitor Agreement
Last Updated: December 7, 2016

Thank you for visiting this website, which is operated by an Affiliate of Cox Media Group, Inc. (“CMG”). This site is one of a network of ad-supported sites operated by Affiliates of CMG each of which also operates a local newspaper, a local television station or a local radio station (each a “CMG Affiliate Site” and, collectively, the “CMG Network of Sites”). Each CMG Affiliate Site has adopted the terms and conditions of this visitor agreement to the extent applicable. “Affiliate” means a company controlling, controlled by or under common control with another company.


This visitor agreement is a binding legal contract between you and the CMG Affiliate that operates this website (“we,” “us” or “our”) and governs your use of such website and any content made available from or through such website, including any subdomains thereof. Please read this visitor agreement carefully. By using our website, application, mobile application, and/or any services offered through our website, application, and/or mobile application (collectively, the “Service”), you accept the terms of this agreement. We may change the terms of this agreement or introduce new terms and conditions from time to time, in which case we will post an updated version of this agreement (“Agreement”) on this Service and will update the “Last Updated” date above to reflect the date the changes take effect. By continuing to use this Service after we post any such changes, you accept this agreement, as modified.


We reserve the right to deny access to this Service or any portion of this Service to anyone who violates this visitor agreement or who, in our judgment, interferes with the ability of others to enjoy this Service or who infringes the rights of others.
We invite you to send in your questions or comments about this Service, or to bring to our attention any material you believe to be inaccurate. To do so, please contact us.


REGISTRATION


To obtain access to certain services on our Service, you may be required to register with us. Children under the age of 13 may not register for the Service. You agree that the information you supply during that registration process will be accurate and complete and that you will not register under the name of, nor attempt to use this Service under the name of, another person. We reserve the right to reject or terminate any user name that, in our judgment, we deem offensive. You will be responsible for preserving the confidentiality of your password and will notify us of any known or suspected unauthorized use of your account.


If you register for our Service, you may be able to use your login credentials for this Service to access certain services on other websites within the CMG Network of Sites or on other applications or mobile applications. In addition, you may also be given an opportunity to register simultaneously with one of our partners, agents or service providers (collectively, our “Service Providers”). Our Service Providers’ websites, applications, or mobile applications may contain terms and conditions that differ from the terms and conditions of this Service.

We encourage you to review those terms and conditions before registering with any applicable website, application, or mobile application. Notwithstanding anything to the contrary in this visitor agreement, we will not be liable for the content of or any services provided by any CMG Affiliate Sites other than this Site or for the content of any site (or application or mobile application) operated by or any services provided by any Service Provider.


PRIVACY


We respect the privacy of the users of our Service. Please take a moment to review our Privacy Statement.


RIGHTS AND LIMITATIONS ON USE OF CONTENT ON THIS SERVICE


Our Limited License to You. The materials available through this Service are the property of us and our Affiliates or licensors, and are protected by copyright, trademark and other intellectual property laws. You are free to display and print for your personal, non-commercial use the content you receive through this Service, provided that you reprint any copyright and other rights notices included in such content. You may not otherwise reproduce any of the materials on this Service, or distribute copies of materials found on this Service in any form (including by email or other electronic means), without prior written permission from the owner. Of course, you're free to encourage others to access the information themselves from our Service and to tell them how to find it. Requests for permission to reproduce or distribute materials found on this Service can be sent to this address.


Links. We welcome links to our Service. You are free to establish a hypertext link to this Service so long as the link does not state or imply any sponsorship of your site, service, application, or mobile application by us.


No Framing. Without our prior written permission, you may not frame, or in-line link, any of the content of this Service, or incorporate into another website, application, mobile application, or other service any of our intellectual property.


Trademarks. We don't want anyone to be confused as to which materials and services are provided by us and which aren't. You may not use any trademark or service mark appearing on this Service without the prior written consent of the owner of the mark. DaytonDailyNews.com is a trademark of Cox Media Group, Inc.


Notice of Copyright Infringement. If you are an owner of intellectual property who believes your intellectual property has been improperly posted or distributed via this Service, please notify us through our feedback procedure or by sending a notice by U.S. Mail to Legal Department, 6205 Peachtree Dunwoody Road, Atlanta, GA 30328, or by email to cmgcopyright@coxinc.com. Your notice to us must include the following information: (1) a physical or electronic signature of a person authorized to act on behalf of the owner of the copyrighted work allegedly infringed; (2) a description of the copyrighted work or works that allegedly have been infringed; (3) a description of where on the Service the allegedly infringing material appears that will allow us to locate the material; (4) a statement by you that you have a good faith belief that the allegedly infringing use has not been authorized by the copyright owner, its agent, or the law; and (5) a statement by you that the information in your notice is accurate, and under penalty of perjury, that you are authorized to act on behalf of the owner of the copyrighted work that has allegedly been infringed.


AP Materials. The materials accessible through this Service may include Associated Press text, photo, graphic, audio, and/or video material (collectively, “AP Material”). Your use of any such AP Material made available by AP is subject to AP’s license terms. The following provision applies to all visitors to this Service (including, without limitation, persons, representatives of legal entities, and digital engines of any kind, including, without limitation, ones that crawl, index, scrape, copy, store, or transmit digital content): By accessing this Service, you specifically acknowledge and agree that (i) AP Material shall not be published, broadcast, rewritten for broadcast or publication, or redistributed directly or indirectly in any medium; (ii) no AP Material nor any portion thereof may be stored in a computer except for personal and non-commercial use; (iii) The Associated Press shall not be held liable for any delays, inaccuracies, errors, or omissions in the AP Material or in the transmission or delivery of any part thereof or for any damages arising therefrom or occasioned thereby; and (iv) The Associated Press is an intended third-party beneficiary of these terms and conditions and may exercise all rights and remedies available to it.


Macrovision Materials. Macrovision Corporation ("Macrovision") holds the exclusive rights to the ALL MUSIC GUIDE and data, as well as the right to distribute certain music related images (collectively, "The Guide"). To the extent The Guide is available through this Service, your use of The Guide shall be subject to the terms of this visitor agreement and all restrictions applicable to and contained in The Guide. You may not modify, copy, scan, or use any other method to reproduce, duplicate, translate, republish, transmit or distribute in any way any portion of The Guide. You agree to indemnify, defend and hold harmless Macrovision, its affiliates, and us and our Affiliates, against any and all claims, damages, costs or other expenses that arise directly or indirectly out of or from (1) your unauthorized use of The Guide, (2) your violation of this provision and/or (3) any unauthorized activities by you in connection with The Guide.


USER-PROVIDED CONTENT


Your License to Us. By submitting material (including, but not limited to, any text, photos, video or other content) to us, you are representing that you are the owner of the material, or are making your submission with the express consent of the owner. By submitting any materials via this Service, you grant us, and anyone authorized by us, including, without limitation, our Affiliates, a perpetual, irrevocable, royalty-free, unlimited, worldwide, transferable, non-exclusive and unrestricted license to use, reproduce, modify, archive, publish, sell, exploit, display, create derivative works from, publicly perform, and otherwise distribute such material in any medium (whether now known or hereafter developed), in any manner we see fit, and for any purpose that we choose. The foregoing grant includes the right to exploit any proprietary rights in materials you submit to this Service, including, but not limited to, rights under copyright, trademark or patent laws that exist throughout the world. Without limiting the generality of the previous sentence, you agree that we may use, distribute, share or otherwise provide such material under any terms we see fit to any third party without the requirement of providing you any form of compensation. You also agree that we, and anyone authorized by us, may identify you as the author of any of your postings by name, email address or screen name, as we or they deem appropriate. We also reserve the right (but assume no obligation) to delete, move, or edit any postings that come to our attention that we consider unacceptable or inappropriate, whether for legal or other reasons. You understand that the technical processing and transmission of the Service, including content submitted by you, may involve transmissions over various networks, and may involve changes to the content to conform and adapt it to technical requirements of connecting networks or devices.


Materials Submitted by Other Users. We cannot and do not review every posting made in any chat rooms, forums, and other areas available for public postings we may provide. You may well read any given posting before anyone on our staff does. Take what you find with a grain of salt. You can expect these areas to include information and opinions from a variety of individuals and organizations other than us. We do not endorse or guarantee the accuracy of any posting, regardless of whether the posting comes from a user, from a celebrity or "expert" guest, or from a member of our staff. There is no substitute for healthy skepticism and your own good judgment.


E-COMMERCE


We may offer certain products and/or services for purchase through this Service that are provided by us or by a third-party merchant. We are not responsible for the quality, accuracy, timeliness, reliability or any other aspect of products and services provided by a third party, and we make no warranties regarding any such products or services. If you make a purchase from a merchant on our Service, or on a third-party website, application, or mobile application that you have accessed through a link on our Service, the information that you provide that merchant on its site, application, or mobile application, or otherwise as part of the transaction, such as your name, address, email, and credit card number may be collected by both the merchant and us. A merchant may have privacy and data collection practices that are different from ours. We have no responsibility or liability for these independent policies. When you purchase products or services on or through this Service, you may be subject to additional terms and conditions that specifically apply to your purchase or use of such products or services. Any such terms that apply to your purchase of products or services from us will be presented to you as part of your transaction. For more information regarding a merchant, its online store, its privacy policies, and/or any additional terms and conditions that may apply, visit that merchant's website, application, or mobile application and click on its information links or contact the merchant directly. You release us and our Affiliates from any damages that you incur, and agree not to assert any claims against us or any of our Affiliates, arising from your purchase or use of any products or services made available by third parties through this Service.


DISCLAIMERS


Use at Your Own Risk. We provide the material available through this Service for informational purposes only. You may only use the material and the services available through this Service for your personal and non-commercial use. We try to ensure that information we post to this Service is both timely and accurate, and that the services offered are reliable. Despite our efforts, however, content or services on this Service may, from time to time, contain errors. In addition, some reports which may appear on this Service, such as stock quotes and related financial news, may be delayed at least 20 minutes due to requirements of the stock exchanges and/or financial information services. Before you act on any information you've found on our Service, you should confirm any facts that are important to your decision. IF YOU RELY ON ANY INFORMATION OR SERVICE AVAILABLE THROUGH THIS SERVICE, YOU DO SO AT YOUR OWN RISK. YOU UNDERSTAND THAT YOU ARE SOLELY RESPONSIBLE FOR ANY DAMAGE OR LOSS YOU MAY INCUR THAT RESULTS FROM YOUR USE OF ANY SERVICE OR ANY MATERIAL AND/OR DATA DOWNLOADED FROM OR OTHERWISE PROVIDED THROUGH THIS SERVICE.


No Endorsements. We are not responsible for, and cannot guarantee the performance of, goods and services provided by our advertisers or others to whose sites, applications, or mobile applications we link. A link to another website, application, or mobile application does not constitute our endorsement of that site, application, or mobile application (nor of any product, service or other material offered on that site, application, or mobile application).


No Warranties.
THIS SERVICE AND ALL MATERIALS, INFORMATION AND SERVICES AVAILABLE THROUGH IT, ARE PROVIDED TO YOU "AS IS," "WITH ALL FAULTS," AND "AS AVAILABLE." WE, OUR AFFILIATES, AGENTS AND LICENSORS CANNOT AND DO NOT WARRANT THE ACCURACY, COMPLETENESS, TIMELINESS, NON-INFRINGEMENT, MERCHANTABILITY OR FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE OF THE MATERIALS, INFORMATION AND SERVICES AVAILABLE THROUGH THIS SERVICE, NOR DO WE GUARANTEE THAT THE MATERIALS, INFORMATION OR SERVICES WILL BE ERROR-FREE, OR CONTINUOUSLY AVAILABLE, OR FREE OF VIRUSES OR OTHER HARMFUL COMPONENTS.


LIMITATIONS OF LIABILITY


UNDER NO CIRCUMSTANCES SHALL WE, OR OUR AFFILIATES SERVICE PROVIDERS OR OUR LICENSORS BE LIABLE TO YOU OR ANYONE ELSE FOR ANY DAMAGES ARISING OUT OF USE OF THIS SERVICE OR ANY PORTION THEREOF, INCLUDING, WITHOUT LIMITATION, LIABILITY FOR CONSEQUENTIAL, SPECIAL, INCIDENTAL, INDIRECT, OR SIMILAR DAMAGES, EVEN IF WE ARE ADVISED BEFOREHAND OF THE POSSIBILITY OF SUCH DAMAGES. (BECAUSE SOME STATES DO NOT ALLOW THE EXCLUSION OR LIMITATION OF CERTAIN CATEGORIES OF DAMAGES, THE ABOVE LIMITATION MAY NOT APPLY TO YOU. IN SUCH STATES, OUR LIABILITY AND THE LIABILITY OF OUR AFFILIATES, AGENTS AND LICENSORS IS LIMITED TO THE FULLEST EXTENT PERMITTED BY SUCH STATE LAW.) YOU AGREE THAT OUR LIABILITY AND THE LIABILITY OF OUR AFFILIATES, AGENTS AND LICENSORS, IF ANY, ARISING OUT OF ANY KIND OF LEGAL CLAIM IN ANY WAY CONNECTED TO THE SERVICE SHALL NOT EXCEED THE AMOUNT YOU PAID FOR THE USE OF THE SERVICE. LIABILITY FOR DAMAGES WILL BE LIMITED AND EXCLUDED IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE PRECEDING SENTENCE EVEN IF ANY REMEDY PROVIDED FOR IN THIS VISITOR AGREEMENT FAILS OF ITS ESSENTIAL PURPOSE.


DISPUTE RESOLUTION

You and the cmg affiliate that operates the Service agree to arbitrate – rather than litigate in court – any and all claims or disputes between the parties (INCLUDING ANY parents, subsidiaries, AFFILIATES, officers, directors, employees, OR agents OF OURS) that arise out of or in any way relate to this SERVICE AND PRODUCTS OR services that we, OUR AFFILIATES AND/oR OUR SERVICE PROVIDER (ON OUR BEHALF) MAY provide to you in connection with YOUR USE OF THIS SERVICE; PROVIDED, HOWEVER, THAT IN NO EVENT SHALL THIS PROVISION PREVENT YOU FROM FILING OR JOINING A COMPLAINT WITH ANY FEDERAL, STATE, OR LOCAL GOVERNMENT AGENCY THAT IS AUTHORIZED BY LAW TO SEEK RELIEF AGAINST us ON YOUR BEHALF. the arbitration between you and the cmg affiliate that operates the Service will be binding AND JUDGMENT ON THE AWARD RENDERED IN THE ARBITRATION MAY BE ENTERED IN ANY COURT HAVING JURISDICTION THEREOF.


In arbitration, there is no judge and no jury, and review of arbitration decisions in the courts is very limited. Instead, disputes will be resolved by an arbitrator, whose authority is governed by the terms of this Agreement. You and the CMG Affiliate that operates the Service agree that an arbitrator may only award such relief as a court of competent jurisdiction could award, limited to the same extent as a court would limit relief pursuant to the terms of this Agreement. An arbitrator may award attorneys’ fees and costs if a court would be authorized to do so, and may issue injunctive or declaratory relief if that relief is required or authorized by the applicable law, but that injunctive or declaratory relief may not extend beyond you and your dealings with us. Discovery may be limited in arbitration, and procedures are more streamlined than in court. Notwithstanding this arbitration agreement, you and the CMG Affiliate that operates the Service may bring appropriate claims against each other in small claims court, if the claims fall within the small claims court’s jurisdiction, or any other federal, state, or local government agency authorized by law to hear your claims.


Class Action Waiver: You and the CMG Affiliate that operates the Service agree that all claims or disputes between you and the CMG Affiliate that operates the Service will be arbitrated individually, and that there will be no class, representative, or consolidated actions in arbitration. If you or we bring a claim in small claims court, the class action waiver will apply, and neither of the parties can bring a claim on a class or representative basis. Furthermore, neither you nor we may participate in a class or representative action as a class member if the class action asserts claims that would fall within the scope of this arbitration agreement if they were directly asserted by you or us. Notwithstanding the foregoing, this arbitration agreement shall not prohibit you or us from participating in any judgment or settlement in any litigation brought by a federal, state, or local government on behalf of you or us, excluding litigation brought by any relator or party in its capacity as a private attorney general. We both agree that this class action waiver is an essential part of our arbitration agreement and that if this class action waiver is found to be unenforceable by any court or arbitrator then the entire arbitration agreement set forth in this section will not apply to any claim or dispute between you and us. This class action waiver may not be severed from our arbitration agreement.


Informal Dispute Resolution: You and the CMG Affiliate that operates the Service agree to try to resolve disputes informally before resorting to arbitration. If the dispute cannot be resolved by telephone, you agree to notify us of the dispute by sending a written description of your claim to [Contact and Address] so that we can attempt to resolve it with you. If we do not satisfactorily resolve your claim within 30 calendar days of receiving notice of it, then you may pursue the claim in arbitration. Neither you nor we may initiate arbitration without first providing the other notice of the claim and following the informal dispute resolution procedure provided in this paragraph.


Arbitration Procedures: You and the CMG Affiliate that operates the Service agree that this Agreement affects interstate commerce and that the Federal Arbitration Act applies. All arbitrations shall be conducted by the American Arbitration Association (“AAA”). The AAA’s rules are available on its website at www.adr.org or by calling 1-800-778-7879. If the claim asserted in arbitration is for less than $75,000, the AAA’s Supplementary Procedures for Consumer-Related Disputes will apply. If the claim asserted is for $75,000 or more, the Commercial Arbitration Rules will apply. If there is a conflict between the AAA’s rules and this dispute resolution agreement, this dispute resolution agreement shall control. To initiate arbitration, you must send a letter requesting arbitration and describing your claims to [Contact and Address]. You must also comply with the AAA’s rules regarding initiation of arbitration. We will pay all filing fees and costs for commencement of an arbitration, but you will be responsible for your own attorneys’ fees and costs unless otherwise determined by the arbitrator pursuant to the terms of this agreement or applicable law. We will not seek to recover our fees and costs from you in the arbitration unless your claim has been determined to be frivolous. If you are successful in the arbitration, we will pay your reasonable attorney’s fees and costs. If you obtain an award from the arbitrator greater than our last written settlement offer, we will pay you $5,000 in addition to what you have been awarded in the arbitration. The arbitration will be held in a mutually convenient location. If you seek less than $10,000, then you may chose to hold the arbitration in person, via phone, or to have it decided based on written submissions.


USE OF COMMUNICATIONS SERVICES


We may provide a variety of services on this Service through which you can directly interact with others, such as email services, chat rooms, communications tools, forums, classifieds and other user-submitted advertising, and other public posting areas ("Communications Services"). For example, you may be able to upload content to participate in a contest or in news gathering on the Service, and you may be able to send a message to another user regarding content on our Service. We want to encourage an open exchange of information and ideas, but at the same time we want everyone to be able to enjoy these Communications Services.


Without limiting the terms of our Privacy Statement, we will not, in the ordinary course of business, review private electronic messages that are not addressed to us or other content or materials submitted through this Service. However, we maintain the right to do so and to use any other forms of information available to us by virtue of your use of our Service (including, for example, reverse IP address inquiry) in order to comply with the law, to enforce this visitor agreement, or to protect the rights, property or safety of visitors to our Service, our customers, the public our employees, Service Providers and Affiliates.


We reserve the right to deny access to any Communications Service to anyone who violates this visitor agreement or who, in our judgment, interferes with the ability of others to enjoy our Service or infringes the rights of others. We will comply with the requirements of the law regarding disclosure of any messages to others, including law enforcement agencies.


Specific Prohibited Uses. Without limiting the foregoing, we may immediately terminate your use of any Communications Service if you engage in any of the following prohibited activities:

  • Uploading, posting, emailing, transmitting or otherwise making available any content that is unlawful, harmful, threatening, abusive, libelous, or obscene;
  • Impersonating any person or entity, or falsely stating or otherwise misrepresenting your affiliation with a person or entity;
  • Forging headers or otherwise manipulating identifiers in a manner that disguises the origin of any content you transmit through any Communications Service;
  • Uploading, posting, emailing, transmitting or otherwise making available any content that you do not have a right to make available under any law or under any contractual or fiduciary relationship (such as inside information, proprietary and confidential information learned or disclosed as part of employment relationships or under nondisclosure agreements);
  • Uploading, posting, emailing, transmitting or otherwise making available any content that infringes any patent, trademark, trade secret, copyright or other proprietary right of any party;
  • Uploading, posting, emailing, transmitting or otherwise making available any unsolicited or unauthorized advertising, promotional materials, or any other form of solicitation, without our express written approval;
  • Gathering for the purpose of "spamming" any email addresses that users post in our chat rooms, forums and other public posting areas;
  • Uploading, posting, emailing, transmitting or otherwise making available any content or material that contains software viruses, worms or any other computer code, files or programs designed to interrupt, destroy or limit the functionality of any computer software or hardware or telecommunications or other equipment, or to cause a security breach of such software, hardware or telecommunications or other equipment;
  • Posting fraudulent classified listings;
  • Uploading or posting any off-topic or irrelevant material to any chat room or forum;
  • Interfering with or disrupting any servers or networks used to provide the Communications Services, or disobeying any requirements, procedures, policies or regulations of the networks we use to provide the Communications Services;
  • Violating any applicable local, state, national or international law, including, but not limited to (1) all applicable laws regarding the transmission of technical data exported from the United States or the country in which you reside, (2) regulations promulgated by the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission, and (3) any rules of any national or other securities exchange, including, without limitation, the New York Stock Exchange, the American Stock Exchange or the NASDAQ;
  • "Stalking" or otherwise harassing another;
  • Instigating or encouraging others to commit illegal activities or cause injury or property damage to any person;
  • Collecting or storing personal data about other users;
  • Gaining unauthorized access to our Service, or any account, computer system, or network connected to this Service, by means such as hacking, password mining or other illicit means; or
  • Obtaining or attempting to obtain any materials or information through any means not intentionally made available through this Service.


Spam. We will immediately terminate any account which we believe is being used to transmit, or is otherwise connected with, any spam or other unsolicited bulk email in connection with any messaging service made available through the Service. In addition, because damages are often difficult to quantify, if actual damages cannot be reasonably calculated, then you agree to pay us liquidated damages of $2 for each item of spam, unsolicited bulk email or private messaging transmitted from, or otherwise connected with, your account. Otherwise you agree to pay our actual damages, to the extent such actual damages can be reasonably calculated.


Viruses. Because of the volume of email messages sent by us, we cannot and do not always monitor such email messages and attachments. You acknowledge and agree that such email messages may contain viruses, worms or other harmful components. You also acknowledge and agree that you are solely responsible for screening the email messages and attachments for viruses, worms and other harmful components.


CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING


Overview. We may allow you to purchase classified advertising for display on the Service. To the extent this Service includes any of the types of classified advertising described below, the terms of this Section will apply to any such classified ads. In addition, if the classified advertising service available through this Service is provided by a third-party Service Provider, your use of that service may also be subject to terms of use adopted by such Service Provider. We reserve the right to reject any ad copy. All orders are subject in all respects to our current rules and regulations and current demands upon advertising space. We reserve the right to edit, reclassify, revise, or cancel any advertisement at any time. Rates and specifications are subject to change. We do not knowingly accept advertising that discriminates or intends to discriminate based on race, color, religion, sex, national origin, handicap or familial status. WE ACCEPT NO LIABILITY FOR ERROR OR OMISSION. YOU MAY NOT RECEIVE A REFUND OF ANY AMOUNTS PAID FOR THE PUBLICATION OF A CLASSIFIED AD ON THIS SERVICE AFTER THE PUBLICATION DEADLINE HAS PASSED.


Personal Advertisements. We are a community, family-oriented Service. Advertisements must be appropriate for all ages. Personal advertising participants must be 18 years or older. All ads must be in good taste and must not solicit for sex or sexual activities. We reserve the right to edit or reject ads that do not meet these standards. You may not use of the personal advertising section for any illegal purpose. We are not liable for the content of the personal advertisements or the responses to such advertisements.


Employment Advertisements. We do not knowingly accept advertisements that discriminate or intend to discriminate on any illegal basis, or that are otherwise illegal. If you think that an advertisement posted on this service discriminates on any illegal basis, or is otherwise illegal, please contact us at [Contact].


Our Service may include advertisements or online services relating to career counseling firms. A career counseling firm does not guarantee actual placement in a job as the result of its services. Understand any agreement that you enter into with a career counseling firm before you pay for the firm's services.


We do not knowingly accept advertisements regarding employment that are not ads for bona fide job opportunities. Regrettably, however, false job postings may appear in listings on our Service from time to time. False job listings are typically used to illegally collect personal information from job seekers or facilitate other forms of illegal activity. Posting false job listings is a violation of this visitor agreement (See: Specific Prohibited Uses) and may be a criminal violation of Federal or state laws. It's important that you to take reasonable precautions when sharing your sensitive information with anyone over the Internet.


Equal Housing Opportunity. Any real estate advertising on this Service is subject to the Fair Housing Act, which makes it illegal to advertise "any preference limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination." Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians; pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. To complain of discrimination call the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development at 800-699-9777.


INDEMNIFICATION


You agree to indemnify and hold us and our Affiliates, Service Providers and our licensors, and all of their respective officers, directors, employees and agents harmless from and against any and all losses, expenses, damages and costs, including reasonable attorneys' fees, that arise out of your use of the Service, violation of this visitor agreement by you or any other person using your account, or your violation of any rights of another. We reserve the right to control defense of any action for which we are entitled to indemnification hereunder. In such event, you agree to cooperate with us, at our expense, as we may reasonably request in connection with our defense of the applicable claim.


GOVERNING LAW; JURISDICTION


This visitor agreement has been made in and shall be construed in accordance with the laws of the State of Georgia, without regard to its conflicts of laws rules. By using this Service, you consent to the exclusive jurisdiction of the state and federal courts in Fulton County, Georgia, for all disputes arising out of or relating to this visitor agreement or this Service.

Local News

  • Kirby Smart’s Georgia Bulldogs maintained their SEC dominance Saturday at Missouri, but a tough road game that the Dawgs couldn’t put away until late in the fourth quarter also revealed some concerns that need fixing if UGA is to live up to expectations. Georgia came into the game knowing that defending against quarterback Drew Lock and his high-powered passing game would be a challenge. Lock completed a lot of passes Saturday, but none of them was for a touchdown, so mark that down as mission accomplished for the Dawgs’ D. Tyson Campbell returns a Missouri fumble for a touchdown during the first half Saturday in Columbia, Mo. (Curtis Compton/AJC) That’s particularly impressive considering that starting cornerback Tyson Campbell, who scooped up a fumble in the first quarter and returned it 64 yards for a score, had to leave the game with a hurt shoulder and dehydration, and was replaced by backup Eric Stokes, who wound up with 3 pass breakups and 4 tackles. (Stokes also was one of the game’s heroes, blocking a second-quarter punt and returning it 8 yards for a touchdown.) However, Mizzou’s resurgent rushing attack proved surprisingly tough to stop (the Tigers scored all four of their touchdowns on runs), with the middle of the Georgia defense looking soft against the ground game, and the continual shuffling of players on the D-line seeming to indicate the coaching staff hasn’t yet solved that puzzle. Mizzou ended up averaging 4.6 yards per run, exactly the same as the acclaimed Georgia rushing attack. The defensive front still doesn’t appear to have gelled; it’s notable that the Dawgs’ leading tacklers on this day were all defensive backs: J.R. Reed (8), Deandre Baker (7) and Richard LeCounte (7). On the other side of the ball, a better-than-expected Tigers defense and an unfocused performance by Jake Fromm and his troops combined to keep the Georgia offense off the scoreboard in the first half. Georgia’s 20-7 halftime lead came courtesy of the defense and special teams. The Dawgs’ explosive offense responded positively to Smart’s “wake up” call at halftime and got back on track. But, even then, Mizzou’s ability to keep chipping away at Georgia’s defense allowed them to hang around as a threat until well into the fourth quarter. As usual with these Dawgs, big plays were the key to the win. Besides the fumble return and the blocked punt that both turned into TDs, Fromm bounced back from going 3-for-9 with an interception in the first half by turning in a second-half performance that included TD passes of 33, 61 and 54 yards. The 61-yarder to J.J. Holloman was a perfect back-shoulder throw by Fromm. On the day, he was 13-of-23 passing for 260 yards, with 3 touchdowns and an interception (which wasn’t his fault; a defender grabbed the ball out of receiver Mecole Hardman’s hands). Eric Stokes celebrates after returning a blocked a punt for a touchdown. (Curtis Compton/AJC) Still, in the end, it was those nonoffensive scores that made the difference for UGA in the 43-29 win. No wonder that Smart sounded as much relieved as he did elated when he spoke with the Bulldogs radio network’s Chuck Dowdle after the game. “We struggled to stop the run and struggled to run the ball,” the Georgia head coach noted. He cited a lack of composure and discipline, adding: “I’m disappointed. We’ve got a lot of things to clean up.” Speaking of things that need cleaning up, besides the troubles stopping the run and too many penalties (7 for 66 yards), Georgia’s offense was poor at third-down conversions, making only 3 of 12. Particularly in need of improvement is the short-yardage game, with the Dawgs having trouble sometimes converting third-and-short and fourth-and-1. Jim Chaney’s play-calling on some drives was ultra conservative, with too many runs up the middle that didn’t get much. Georgia seemed to have more success on the outside, where they could capitalize on their superior team speed. Other times, it wasn’t so much the play-calling as it was Fromm seeming to opt into the wrong play. On one drive in the second quarter, it was third-and-6 and Fromm gave it to Swift, who got very little. With the Tigers in man coverage and the safeties cheating up, a pass likely would have been more successful. Another time, later in the quarter, it was third-and-10, and a run by Swift got about 4 yards. One thing we did find out Saturday was that Georgia does indeed have a red-zone package for Justin Fields. The freshman dual-threat backup QB came in for just one play in the red zone in the second quarter, a short gain on a keeper. The verdict is still out on the effectiveness of that strategy. Otherwise, Fields didn’t play against Mizzou. Besides Fromm in the second half, who looked good for the Dawgs? Riley Ridley, who made 5 catches for 87 yards and one touchdown. One of those catches was a crucial 27-yarder in the fourth quarter that allowed the Dawgs to kill a bunch of clock. Also on offense, the running game may not have been as imposing as most folks expected, but Elijah Holyfield racked up 90 yards on 14 carries while starter D’Andre Swift had 71 yards on 16 runs. It looks like these two really are sort of 1A and 1B (like Nick Chubb and Sony Michel were last year), and, based on the past couple of games, I’d say Holyfield deserves to be considered 1A. As for Swift, who was barely used against Middle Tennessee the previous week amid reports he was having some groin trouble, the Philly flash showed no obvious limitations, but didn’t seem to have quite the burst he had last year, either. D’Andre Swift runs against a better-than-expected Missouri defense. (Curtis Compton/AJC) The offensive line had a rough day, with Andrew Thomas, who had just returned to the starting lineup after missing the MTSU game, apparently reinjuring himself, and right guard  Ben Cleveland also leaving the game with what appeared to be a left leg injury. Still, Georgia ended the day with 445 yards of total offense to Missouri’s 393. On defense, cornerback Deandre Baker smothered highly touted Mizzou receiver Emanuel Hall, who didn’t catch a ball all day (but who just had returned from his own groin injury, and didn’t appear to be at full speed). Also impressive was outside linebacker D’Andre Walker, who was a constant presence in the Tigers’ backfield, forcing fumbles on two sacks of Lock. Georgia scored 10 points off three Missouri turnovers, all in the first half, while the Tigers got no points off their one interception. Special teams play was a mixed bag. The blocked punt was big, Hardman had some nice return yards, and Rodrigo Blankenship made three field goals, but he missed another and had one attempt blocked when someone on the line missed an assignment. A stiff wind also put an end to Blankenship’s nation-leading string of touchbacks on kickoffs. The officiating was inconsistent. Georgia benefited from one video review (after Holloman became the latest Bulldog to drop the ball as he was crossing the goal line!) and lost out on another when a fumble recovery was ruled an incomplete pass. The officials hit Georgia with a couple of ticky-tacky calls on plays that didn’t really merit a flag, but completely missed a cheap-shot roughing of Fromm. Overall, any SEC road win is to be savored, and Georgia showed a resilience and ability to answer scores against Mizzou that was encouraging. Still, there’s no getting around the fact that there were signs aplenty in Saturday’s game that this banged-up Bulldogs team has a way to go before fans can start thinking about a return to the College Football Playoff. The post Tough win shows Georgia’s battered Bulldogs need to improve in key areas appeared first on DawgNation.
  • The Georgia Bulldogs head to Missouri  intent on making quarterback Drew Lock uncomfortable, whether that means recording a sack or not. Bulldogs linebacker Monty Rice made that clear in his media session this week at Butts-Mehre Heritage Hall when asked about the Bulldogs generating just one sack through three games. ADVERTISING “It’s not about getting sacks — sacks don’t win games,” Rice said. “It’s about getting pressure on the quarterback, making sure he’s not comfortable, getting him moving his feet.” The No. 2-ranked Georgia football program (3-0) will be facing arguably the best quarterback in the nation in Lock, who has led the Tigers to a 3-0 start and wins in nine of their past 10 games. “I’ve enjoyed my time so far these first three weeks,” Lock said on the SEC Network’s Paul Finebaum Show on Wednesday. “Getting UGA in here, being a big-time SEC game, it’s something Columbia needs.” The Bulldogs’ defense certainly won’t have stars in its eyes, having seen top quarterbacks the past two seasons. “Last year Baker Mayfield was an NFL quarterback,” Rice said, “so [Lock] is a person just like we are, he makes mistakes just like I do, so it’s not that big of a deal.” The Bulldogs are a two-touchdown favorite in what many believe could turn into a shootout. Georgia quarterback Jake Fromm is completing 80 percent of his passes this season with six touchdowns and one interception. The Bulldogs have been so dominant that Fromm has not played in a fourth quarter in the 2018 season. Lock and the Tigers could change that with their potent offense. While Georgia has allowed just two passes of 20 yards or more this season, Missouri has seven receivers who have caught passes of 20 yards or more in the first three games. Rice, who has played both of the inside linebacker positions in the Bulldogs’ 3-4, said taking away the Tigers’ run game is ultimately the key to getting to Lock. “It’s big because we’ve got some good stuff on third down that we can go to, that people won’t be able to block,” Rice said. “But if it’s third-and-2, we can’t run that.” Smart alluded to the same thing, pointing out that Missouri’s commitment to the run under first-year offensive coordinator Derek Dooley has led to favorable matchups for the receivers. “To have the commitment and play in the SEC, you’ve got to be able to run the ball,” Smart said, “and the last three games, their [Missouri’s] commitment to that has allowed them to get one on one matchups outside.” Smart pointed out that Middle Tennessee geared its scheme to get rid of the ball quickly, erasing opportunities for quarterback sacks. South Carolina and Austin Peay were similar, Jonathan Ledbetter said. “The teams that we’ve been playing, we haven’t been able to get a lot of pass rush, that is true, but we’ve been playing teams that have been doing a lot of quick game, the ball is out of the quarterbacks hands in under two seconds, so it’s hard to get to the quarterback,” Ledbetter said. “You have to find other ways to affect them, like batted balls and trying to break up passes with D-Linemen, just to help out the secondary in coverage.” Ledbetter said the Georgia defensive line will be intent on getting to Lock, but like Rice, he said the ultimate objective is to make Lock uncomfortable. “That’s really you can do, you try to get back there as fast as you can, have good pocket push, and the really the way to affect him is to make him step up and get uncomfortable in the pocket,” Ledbetter said, “that just comes with pass rush and everyone working together.”
  • Officials in Winterville say they are looking for people to serve on the Board of Directors for the Winterville Marigold Festival. Applications are on the Marigold Festival website; the deadline to apply is October 1. From the City of Winterville… The Winterville Marigold Festival, a 501(c)(3) non-profit corporation, is seeking applications for new Board of Directors members. Board members will actively participate in planning for the annual Marigold Festival and will be an integral part in the decisions surrounding annual funding of projects in the City. You do not have to reside in Winterville city limits to serve on this board. Applications are available on our website at: http://marigoldfestival.com/files/documents/BoardApplication_2018.pdf and are due by October 1, 2018. For more information about the Winterville Marigold Festival or this Board opportunity, email admin@marigoldfestival.com, visit our website at www.MarigoldFestival.com, or follow us on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/MarigoldFestival/
  • A man accused of shooting his friend in a Lake Oconee mansion said he was protecting himself at the time. In an exclusive interview at the jail with Channel 2's Mark Winne, Chad Haufler, 45, said he remembers the two had been drinking and had gotten into a fight but doesn't remember pulling the trigger. He called the shooting self-defense. 'I'm not denying that I did not do it,' Haufler told Winne.  Channel 2 Action News first told you about this story when the shooting happened on Aug. 29. NewsChopper 2 was above the scene of the mansion that day as officers scoured the yard of the large home for evidence. Crime scene tape roped off a large part of the home. Police said Haufler called 911 around 6:30 a.m. to report the shooting at his home on Jones Bluff Court in Reynolds at Lake Oconee. In the 911 call, Haufler said he had shot an intruder in his home. When deputies arrived, Marc Dimos, 51, was found dead in the basement. Greene County Sheriff Donnie Harrison Jr. said investigators didn't believe the invasion story and hours later, they charged Haufler with murder. In his interview with Winne, Haufler said Dimos was a friend of his that he met last year in Colorado during a hunting trip. 'We became close. We just clicked together. We became hunting buddies,' Haufler said. Haufler, a retired firefighter from Florida, said he has benefited from good family investments and was recently able to buy the large home on Lake Oconee. Haufler indicated he'd invited Dimos to his family's $1.9 million-plus vacation home. He said they spent time riding in the boat, eating at the Ritz-Carlton and hanging out in the pool, shooting the breeze, until things took a turn. Haufler suggests there is much he does not remember from the night of Aug. 26. Haufler: 'We were drinking.' Winne: 'Were you drunk?' Haufler: 'Yes.' Winne: 'Was Marc Dimos drunk also?' Haufler: 'I would assume so, yes. He was doing shots of tequila. I remember waking up on the floor and Marc has me in a chokehold and I can't breathe. And I remember struggling on the floor with him, fighting and wrestling. I had bruises all over my body and stuff.' Winne: 'You don’t know what caused this?' Haufler: 'I don’t know, I don’t know what caused this. I'd never had any foul words with Marc at all, ever. Winne: 'Where did the gun come from?' Haufler: 'I don’t know where it was.' Winne: 'Would you have been wearing the gun on you in your vacation home?' Haufler: 'No, but I would have a gun in my house.' Winne: 'Would you have had it in the basement?' Haufler: 'Could’ve been.'  When asked if this was a convenient loss of memory, Haufler said, 'Oh, I really wish I could remember. It hurts me every night. I wish I could recall the whole incident.' 
  • The state Board of Regents calls for millions of dollars in state funding for work on new facilities for the University of North Georgia: with the approval of the Georgia legislature, which convenes in January, UNG would get $13.6 million for work on the former campus of Lanier Technical College, which sits next to the main North Georgia campus in Gainesville. 

Bulldog News

  • COLUMBIA, Mo. — Georgia football coach Kirby Smart gave Missouri credit for stepping up and playing a good football game, but the Tigers say the Bulldogs didn’t see their best game. “If we play our A-game, we can compete with anyone in the country, and that’s something I believe in my soul,” Missouri quarterback Drew Lock told the St. Louis Post-Dispatch. “We felt like we beat ourselves.” The No. 2-ranked Georgia football program never trailed, taking a 20-7 lead into the halftime despite not getting an offensive touchdown until the second half. Missouri failed to cut the Bulldogs lead to single digits in the second half, and Lock struggled. Lock, who entered the game leading the SEC in passing, failed to throw a touchdown pass for the first time in a game in more than a year, finishing 23-of-48 for 221 yards with an interception and a lost fumble. Lock’s longest completion went for 25 yards, as Georgia All-American cornerback Deandre Baker erased previous SEC receiving leader Emanuel Hall, holding him without a catch. Still, the Tigers came away convinced they should have beaten Georgia. “It stings because it feels like we gave the game away,” Missouri offensive guard Kevin Pendleton told the St. Louis Post-Dispatch. “All the credit to Georgia. They’re a hell of a team, and they capitalized on a lot of opportunities. But it’s one that’s going to sting and one that we have to carry through the rest of the year so we can’t let this happen again.” Georgia finished with 445 total yards to Missouri’s 393, and quarterback Jake Fromm was 7-of-9 passing for 194 yards and three touchdowns in the second half alone. The Tigers’ defense said much of the Bulldogs’ success had to do with their errors. “We leave the game with a sour taste in our mouth just because of the self-inflicted wounds we put ourselves through,” Missouri linebacker Cale Garrett told the Kansas City Star. “I thought we had a genuine chance to win this game and had them on their heels at times. … “It’s a little bit frustrating to be that close to winning a game and then losing just because of things on our side.” Georgia-Missouri DawgNation coverage 5 things from Georgia win over Missouri: Red flags, orange alert Georgia coach Kirby Smart shares halftime message of 43-29 win Chip Towers Georgia football report card for Missouri Ben Cleveland among 4 Georgia football starters knocked out of Missouri game Jake Fromm happy to get best of Drew Lock in matchup Georgia football stock report for Missouri game Bulldogs freshman Eric Stokes comes through with game ball day Instant analysis: Second-half surge lifts Georgia football Georgia football recap: Real time scoring, breaking news and injuries Bulldogs’ corner Deandre Baker shuts out SEC’s leading receiver The post Missouri QB Drew Lock: ‘We beat ourselves’ in 43-29 loss to Georgia appeared first on DawgNation.
  • Kirby Smart’s Georgia Bulldogs maintained their SEC dominance Saturday at Missouri, but a tough road game that the Dawgs couldn’t put away until late in the fourth quarter also revealed some concerns that need fixing if UGA is to live up to expectations. Georgia came into the game knowing that defending against quarterback Drew Lock and his high-powered passing game would be a challenge. Lock completed a lot of passes Saturday, but none of them was for a touchdown, so mark that down as mission accomplished for the Dawgs’ D. Tyson Campbell returns a Missouri fumble for a touchdown during the first half Saturday in Columbia, Mo. (Curtis Compton/AJC) That’s particularly impressive considering that starting cornerback Tyson Campbell, who scooped up a fumble in the first quarter and returned it 64 yards for a score, had to leave the game with a hurt shoulder and dehydration, and was replaced by backup Eric Stokes, who wound up with 3 pass breakups and 4 tackles. (Stokes also was one of the game’s heroes, blocking a second-quarter punt and returning it 8 yards for a touchdown.) However, Mizzou’s resurgent rushing attack proved surprisingly tough to stop (the Tigers scored all four of their touchdowns on runs), with the middle of the Georgia defense looking soft against the ground game, and the continual shuffling of players on the D-line seeming to indicate the coaching staff hasn’t yet solved that puzzle. Mizzou ended up averaging 4.6 yards per run, exactly the same as the acclaimed Georgia rushing attack. The defensive front still doesn’t appear to have gelled; it’s notable that the Dawgs’ leading tacklers on this day were all defensive backs: J.R. Reed (8), Deandre Baker (7) and Richard LeCounte (7). On the other side of the ball, a better-than-expected Tigers defense and an unfocused performance by Jake Fromm and his troops combined to keep the Georgia offense off the scoreboard in the first half. Georgia’s 20-7 halftime lead came courtesy of the defense and special teams. The Dawgs’ explosive offense responded positively to Smart’s “wake up” call at halftime and got back on track. But, even then, Mizzou’s ability to keep chipping away at Georgia’s defense allowed them to hang around as a threat until well into the fourth quarter. As usual with these Dawgs, big plays were the key to the win. Besides the fumble return and the blocked punt that both turned into TDs, Fromm bounced back from going 3-for-9 with an interception in the first half by turning in a second-half performance that included TD passes of 33, 61 and 54 yards. The 61-yarder to J.J. Holloman was a perfect back-shoulder throw by Fromm. On the day, he was 13-of-23 passing for 260 yards, with 3 touchdowns and an interception (which wasn’t his fault; a defender grabbed the ball out of receiver Mecole Hardman’s hands). Eric Stokes celebrates after returning a blocked a punt for a touchdown. (Curtis Compton/AJC) Still, in the end, it was those nonoffensive scores that made the difference for UGA in the 43-29 win. No wonder that Smart sounded as much relieved as he did elated when he spoke with the Bulldogs radio network’s Chuck Dowdle after the game. “We struggled to stop the run and struggled to run the ball,” the Georgia head coach noted. He cited a lack of composure and discipline, adding: “I’m disappointed. We’ve got a lot of things to clean up.” Speaking of things that need cleaning up, besides the troubles stopping the run and too many penalties (7 for 66 yards), Georgia’s offense was poor at third-down conversions, making only 3 of 12. Particularly in need of improvement is the short-yardage game, with the Dawgs having trouble sometimes converting third-and-short and fourth-and-1. Jim Chaney’s play-calling on some drives was ultra conservative, with too many runs up the middle that didn’t get much. Georgia seemed to have more success on the outside, where they could capitalize on their superior team speed. Other times, it wasn’t so much the play-calling as it was Fromm seeming to opt into the wrong play. On one drive in the second quarter, it was third-and-6 and Fromm gave it to Swift, who got very little. With the Tigers in man coverage and the safeties cheating up, a pass likely would have been more successful. Another time, later in the quarter, it was third-and-10, and a run by Swift got about 4 yards. One thing we did find out Saturday was that Georgia does indeed have a red-zone package for Justin Fields. The freshman dual-threat backup QB came in for just one play in the red zone in the second quarter, a short gain on a keeper. The verdict is still out on the effectiveness of that strategy. Otherwise, Fields didn’t play against Mizzou. Besides Fromm in the second half, who looked good for the Dawgs? Riley Ridley, who made 5 catches for 87 yards and one touchdown. One of those catches was a crucial 27-yarder in the fourth quarter that allowed the Dawgs to kill a bunch of clock. Also on offense, the running game may not have been as imposing as most folks expected, but Elijah Holyfield racked up 90 yards on 14 carries while starter D’Andre Swift had 71 yards on 16 runs. It looks like these two really are sort of 1A and 1B (like Nick Chubb and Sony Michel were last year), and, based on the past couple of games, I’d say Holyfield deserves to be considered 1A. As for Swift, who was barely used against Middle Tennessee the previous week amid reports he was having some groin trouble, the Philly flash showed no obvious limitations, but didn’t seem to have quite the burst he had last year, either. D’Andre Swift runs against a better-than-expected Missouri defense. (Curtis Compton/AJC) The offensive line had a rough day, with Andrew Thomas, who had just returned to the starting lineup after missing the MTSU game, apparently reinjuring himself, and right guard  Ben Cleveland also leaving the game with what appeared to be a left leg injury. Still, Georgia ended the day with 445 yards of total offense to Missouri’s 393. On defense, cornerback Deandre Baker smothered highly touted Mizzou receiver Emanuel Hall, who didn’t catch a ball all day (but who just had returned from his own groin injury, and didn’t appear to be at full speed). Also impressive was outside linebacker D’Andre Walker, who was a constant presence in the Tigers’ backfield, forcing fumbles on two sacks of Lock. Georgia scored 10 points off three Missouri turnovers, all in the first half, while the Tigers got no points off their one interception. Special teams play was a mixed bag. The blocked punt was big, Hardman had some nice return yards, and Rodrigo Blankenship made three field goals, but he missed another and had one attempt blocked when someone on the line missed an assignment. A stiff wind also put an end to Blankenship’s nation-leading string of touchbacks on kickoffs. The officiating was inconsistent. Georgia benefited from one video review (after Holloman became the latest Bulldog to drop the ball as he was crossing the goal line!) and lost out on another when a fumble recovery was ruled an incomplete pass. The officials hit Georgia with a couple of ticky-tacky calls on plays that didn’t really merit a flag, but completely missed a cheap-shot roughing of Fromm. Overall, any SEC road win is to be savored, and Georgia showed a resilience and ability to answer scores against Mizzou that was encouraging. Still, there’s no getting around the fact that there were signs aplenty in Saturday’s game that this banged-up Bulldogs team has a way to go before fans can start thinking about a return to the College Football Playoff. The post Tough win shows Georgia’s battered Bulldogs need to improve in key areas appeared first on DawgNation.
  • COLUMBIA, Mo. — The Georgia football program left Missouri on Saturday afternoon saying it didn’t live up to the team’s self-imposed standard. The No. 2-ranked Bulldogs (4-0, 2-0 SEC) got the win, but it came at the cost of four starters getting knocked out of the game including what could be a season-ending leg injury to right guard Ben Cleveland. Here are 5 takeaways from the 43-29 victory over the Tigers (3-1, 0-1), and what it means moving forward. The Injuries Bettors might disagree, but the most impactful part of Saturday’s outcome was Georgia’s potential loss of starting right guard Ben Cleveland (leg) for the rest of the season. Smart’s report on injuries was preliminary, but he also said receiver Tyler Simmons could be out “two to three weeks” with an undisclosed injury. Starting left tackle Andrew Thomas was a surprise start who didn’t appear completely healthy in practice the week. Thomas appeared to re-injure his ankle and is questionable, at best, for the Tennessee game. Freshman cornerback Tyson Campbell suffered a shoulder subluxation and grew nauseated upon his return to the game. Smart said Campbell would be fine, but shoulder subluxations tend to be recurring, so it’s an injury that bears monitoring. Finally, inside linebacker Monty Rice was a pregame scratch, unable to overcome a knee injury (MCL) that Smart said has been troubling him in practice since the Middle Tennessee win on Sept. 15. The issues T he line play is something Smart is truly concerned about, particularly on defense. “If you asked me what was the one most disappointing thing, they were able to run the ball, especially in the low-red area,” Smart said. “It’s one thing to run it in the field, but they ran it in the low-red area, which is concerning for us, because that’s not who we are. “We had everybody in the box we could have in the box, we just didn’t play through people. They out-manned us down there.” The identity Smart made it clear that, despite some short-yardage struggles in the run game, there’s no plan to modify the base offense. “I thought we could get a yard when we had to and didn’t,” Smart said. “That’s something we’ll continue to do. That’s who we are. We’ve just got to get better at it.” Tailbacks Brian Herrien and Elijah Holyfield were both stopped on down-and-distance situations requiring just one yard, unable to generate anything without the help of Georgia’s suddenly-hobbled offensive line. The Bulldogs’ perimeter speed is what makes the offense elite, even without Cal transfer Demetris Robertson catching a pass or touching the ball since the opening game. The quarterbacks Jake Fromm finished Saturday’s game with great momentum, and Smart and offensive coordinator Jim Chaney showed they’re willing to use Justin Fields situationally. Fromm was 7-of-9 passing for 194 yards with three touchdowns in the second half at Missouri after a slow start, adhering to Smart’s halftime team message to “wake up.” Fields was inserted for one play in the second quarter, a first-down quarterback draw at the Missouri 7 yard line that generated 3 yards. Smart seemed to debunk the notion that Georgia might develop a package for Fields at the start of fall camp, saying he viewed his quarterbacks as similar enough to run the same offense. The future First South Carolina, then Missouri and now Kentucky is deemed the biggest threat to Georgia. But next, Tennessee, a program coming off a self-inflicted, six-turnover 47-21 loss to Florida. Jeremy Pruitt’s history with Georgia is somewhat controversial, most viewing his time with the Bulldogs as beneficial though divisive. It’s a well-time road trip for Pruitt’s Vols, who will arrive at Sanford Stadium with everything to gain and nothing to lose, hoping to recapture the magic that led them to wins over Georgia in 2015 and 2016. Meanwhile it’s a long season for the Bulldogs. With injuries adding up and a front seven that’s failing to measure up, Georgia needs to make good on Smart’s vow to improve each week if they’re to do anything more than win the SEC East Division. Georgia-Missouri DawgNation coverage Georgia coach Kirby Smart shares halftime message of 43-29 win Chip Towers Georgia football report card for Missouri Ben Cleveland among 4 Georgia football starters knocked out of Missouri game Jake Fromm happy to get best of Drew Lock in matchup Georgia football stock report for Missouri game Bulldogs freshman Eric Stokes comes through with game ball day Instant analysis: Second-half surge lifts Georgia football Georgia football recap: Real time scoring, breaking news and injuries Bulldogs’ corner Deandre Baker shuts out SEC’s leading receiver   The post Georgia football: 5 things moving forward, red flags, orange alert appeared first on DawgNation.
  • COLUMBIA, Mo. — Georgia quarterback Jake Fromm said it was a matter of the offense coming together in the second half, but it sure looked like it might have to do with taking deeper shots downfield. 4️⃣ for more ‼️ #GoDawgs #GeorgiaFootball pic.twitter.com/BgxLs1gPis — Georgia Football (@FootballUGA) September 23, 2018 Fromm was 13-of-23 passing for 260 yards with three touchdowns and an interception in the No. 2-ranked Bulldogs’ 43-29 win at Missouri on Saturday. First-half Fromm was 6-of-14 passing for 66 yards and an interception — but second-half Fromm was 7-of-9 passing for 194 yards with three touchdowns. “Coach talked to us and said, ‘Hey we have to get things going,’ and collectively, we got together and got things going,” Fromm said, asked about the second half surge. “We just came together as an offensive unit, really focused, really determined and striving toward that one goal.” The first half, Fromm said, was not up to par. “We left a lot of plays and a lot of points out there,” Fromm said. “So we needed to play better on offense in the first half, and just really execute better.” Fromm said “winning is a blessing,” but also, that he expects improvement moving forward. “We need to play better,” Fromm said. “We have a high standard here at the University of Georgia, so we need to come out and practice better this week, and play at the level we can play at.” Fromm entered the game 0-for-6 on third down conversions of third-and-10 or more. On the first instance of such Saturday, he threw an interception from the Missouri 39 in the first quarter. RELATED: Fuss with Jake Fromm through 3 games on third-and-long On the second circumstance on Saturday, a third-and-11 at the Missouri 42 in the fourth quarter, Fromm went downfield and found Riley Ridley for a 27-yard gain. Fromm was not sacked again Missouri despite the Bulldogs losing two starters to injuries in the game. Left tackle Andrew Thomas limped off in the fist quarter, and right guard Ben Cleveland was helped off the field by teammates after suffering what appeared to be a serious leg injury in the third quarter. “You hate to see any guy go down, but [no sacks] is a testament to our football team, it’s a next man up mentality,” Fromm said. “Coach [Sam] Pittman does a great job of   recruiting and then coaching as well, so we just roll guys in there and continue to play as a unit.” The Bulldogs play host to Tennessee at 3:30 p.m. Saturday at Sanford Stadium. Georgia football QB Jake Fromm   Georgia-Missouri DawgNation coverage Cornerback Deandre Baker shuts down SEC’s top WR at Missouri Georgia coach Kirby Smart shares halftime message of 43-29 win Ben Cleveland among 4 Georgia football starters knocked out of Missouri game Georgia football stock report for Missouri game Bulldogs freshman Eric Stokes comes through with game ball day Instant analysis: Second-half surge lifts Georgia football Georgia football recap: Real time scoring, breaking news and injuries   The post WATCH Georgia QB Jake Fromm: ‘We need to play better’ appeared first on DawgNation.
  • COLUMBIA — Georgia wins by two touchdowns on the road and the primary discussion after the game was what’s wrong with the Bulldogs. This is where Georgia is in year three under Kirby Smart. The No. 2-ranked Bulldogs beat Missouri 43-29 on Saturday at Faurot Field and did so with relative indifference. For sure, there were brief periods of angst and even a moment or two where the outcome was in doubt. But in the grander scheme, the Bulldogs didn’t come close to playing their best football and still won. There were penalties, missed kicks, missed blocks, blocked kick and squandered opportunities. Yet, there Georgia was late in the fourth quarter, running out the clock and taking a knee deep in Missouri territory as the clock expired. “We didn’t play with discipline, composure, really not much physicality when you look at the run game for us and stopping the run defensively,” Georgia coach Kirby Smart said. “But I am proud of the way we competed, proud of the way we were resilient. When they made a play, we came back and made a play. A lot of guys stepped up today.” A lot of guys had to step up because a lot of Bulldogs went down. Four starters left the game with injuries or illness — Andrew Thomas, Ben Cleveland, Tyson Campebell and Tyler Simmons — and yet Georgia never wavered and never trailed. It went ahead 27-7 early in the third quarter and the lead was never seriously threatened again. And this came against a team that may or not be the second-best in the division. Still, the Bulldogs were emphatic in the notion they can play much better. They can, and will need to remain in the playoff discussion. On to the grades: Offense: B It feels too generous to give the offense a good grade based on the team’s comments and remarks after the game. Quarterback Jake Fromm and his cohorts were extremely critical of their own work in the immediate aftermath. There were penalties, an interception, 10 incompletions and the most pedestrian ground game we’ve witnessed since last year’s regular-season game at Auburn. But then there was the good stuff, too. Like the three long scoring plays in the second half and Fromm’s 20-yard average per pass completion. Like Elijah Holyfield’s 90 yards on 14 carries. Like Riley Ridley’s 5 receptions for 87 yards. And most of this came with starting offensive linemen Andrew Thomas (ankle) and Ben Cleveland (lower leg) out of the game with leg injuries. Georgia’s final numbers were where they’ve been at the end of games all season, but just slightly skewed toward the pass: 443 total yards, 185 rushing, 260 passing. But that’s not particularly encouraging seeing what Purdue did against the same defense a week earlier (614 yards, 572 passing). Defense: B Again, 393 yards was a season high allowed by the Bulldogs, as was Missouri’s 26 first downs. But Georgia’s defenders also put another 7 spot on the scoreboard with a fumble-return touchdown by Campbell in the first quarter. And the Bulldogs kept heralded senior quarterback Drew Lock from throwing a touchdown pass for the first time in 13 games. Lock passed for an SEC record 44 touchdown passes last year. As for all those folks wondering aloud a “where’s the pressure,” Georgia’s defense answered emphatically with two sacks, three hurries and two forced fumbles. Senior outside linebacker D’Andre Walker had a hand in most of that, but so did interior linemen Julian Rochester, Jonathan Ledbetter and Tyler Clark. Meanwhile, playing without Campbell (shoulder, dehydration) for much of the game, Georgia’s secondary held its own against the best receiver corps it has seen so far. Redshirt freshman Eric Stokes stepped in for Campbell at corner and had four pass break-ups. Fellow corner Deandre Baker also shut out Missouri big-play wideout Emanuel Hall. Smart was not pleased with the Tigers’ 172 rushing yards and their general success on first down. And Missouri went 4-for-4 with four touchdowns in the red zone. Special teams: C Returner Mecole Hardman got the rare opportunity to bring a few kickoffs out of the end zone. He returned three of for 91 yards and added 23 yards on one punt return. Also, the Bulldogs landed the special teams’ holy grail — a blocked-kick touchdown. Eric Stokes blocked a punt with his facemask and returned the ball eight yards for a score. Meanwhile, place-kicker Rodrigo Blankenship had three more field goals and recorded his resident seven touchbacks on kickoffs. But Blankenship also missed a 49-yard kick wide right and had another field-goal attempt blocked. Blankenship had his consecutive touchback streak of 23 in a row this season end. Jake Camarda averaged 41 yards on two punts, but he got away with one skied shank, which ended on a favorable roll. Overall, not bad, but average for a group that usually dominates the opponent. Coaching: B Georgia seemed to have a good game plan for Missouri. The Bulldogs wanted to be aggressive in every way and were. They won the opening coin toss and elected to receive, which was out of character.  Then they took risks, throwing more deep balls on offense and occasionally blitzing to get pressure on Lock. Georgia did not record a first-half offensive touchdown, however, and was 0-for-3 getting in the end zone from the red zone. On first-and-goal from the 7, the Bulldogs brought in quarterback Justin Fields, who ran a quarterback draw for three yards on first down and then left the game for good. And then Jake Fromm was asked to throw on two straight deep corner patterns, which failed. Once again, halftime adjustments resulted in second-half dividends. The Bulldogs scored touchdowns on their first two possessions of the third quarter and again on the first play of the fourth quarter. But Missouri matched them with two third-quarter scores as well. The Bulldogs were flagged for seven times for 66 yards in penalties. Smart bemoaned Georgia’s  lack of “discipline and composure” Saturday and said, “that’s on me.” Overall: B Again, it’s good any time you can win a divisional conference game by two touchdowns on the road. But with a No. 2 national ranking and early College Football Playoff projections, the Bulldogs are now going to be compared to the best the teams in the country. Right now the No. 1 team is Alabama, and Georgia hasn’t looked like it could compete with the Crimson Tide. The good news is Georgia has yet to play at peak level and the Bulldogs’ coaches will return to Athens with many “teaching moments” to go over. This remains the SEC’s youngest team and the 15th youngest in the country, with 68.2 percent freshmen and sophomores. So there is certainly time and opportunity for continued improvement. DawgNation coverage of Georgia-Missouri: Georgia QB Jake admittedly pleased to get edge on buddy Drew Lock Postgame Injury Report: 4 starters have to leave game with injuries INSTANT ANALYSIS: Another 2nd-half surge for Bulldogs puts away Missouri, 43-29 Bulldogs’ Deandre Baker shuts out SEC’s top receiver Heads-up play by Eric Stokes benefits Georgia on defense, special teams Stock Report: Georgia cashes in on Missouri turnovers Georgia coach Kirby Smart shares halftime message vs. Missouri WATCH: Georgia’s D’Andre Walker doubles down on sacks DawgNation Pregame: Georgia fans turn out big at Missouri’s Memorial Stadium         The post Report card: Along with victory, Georgia returns from Missouri with many ‘teaching moments’ appeared first on DawgNation.